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Task force talks additions, subtractions as it studies future of local elementary schools

Any discussion about the school district's decision making process turns into an adoption of the victimhood mantra. If you don't like the task force, sign up to run for the school board and enjoy the benefits of being derided in this forum for any decision you make.

January 19, 2011 at 8:09 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Journal: Study linking vaccine to autism was fraud

He received nearly 3/4 million dollars from the plaintiff's bar. They used him and his study to sue big Pharma. Lots of similar stuff out there published to enhance settlements.

January 6, 2011 at 9:06 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

No, I am not a doctor but my brother is and he has never been divorced. Your callous disregard of their sacrifices is fairly normal for people who have never experienced what these people go through to get where they are. I have made excellent choices in my life and am very happy. Sounds to me I should be glad you are not my patient. All doctors graduate in the top 10 % of their undergraduate classes or have some other special talent in order to get into medical school. Wake up and smell the coffee.

January 3, 2011 at 12:18 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

I know hundreds of doctors who work 80 hours per week and very few who work 40 hour weeks, nine to five. Doctors are well paid because they are highly trained and it takes years to get there. The divorce rate of doctors is high partially because of the sacrifices they make to serve their patients. I can only assume you have been through college, graduated in the top 10 % of your class, paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for your undergraduate and medical education, gone to med school for four years, followed by a residency/ fellowship of up to 9 years in order to speak so knowledgably of their limited sacrifices.

January 3, 2011 at 11:41 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

Until recently doctors had no mechanism of having the patient's entire chart available to them away from the office. It is always risky to prescribe medicines without a complete medical history available to the doctor. Even now, many doctors do not have access to an electronic medical record on all their or their partner's patients.

January 3, 2011 at 11:35 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

No the point is that Pamela called the office at a time when it was closed. This resulted in a charge (at the doctor's discretion) as it was felt this was not an emergency. He rendered a service and felt it was reasonable to be paid for his time. The pharmacist would do the same if he rendered a service to you when he was not in his office.

January 3, 2011 at 11:32 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

I assume you know for a fact this doctor's office did not send out a notification of their change in policy (with actual costs of phone calls) by mail or on their billing statement or on their web site or in their newsletter?

I can assume the pharmacist you use gets out of bed and fills the $4 prescription for you when you call at 0200 or on Christmas Eve at 8 PM?

January 3, 2011 at 10:27 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

The price you pay for your prescription includes payment to the pharmacist and drug store for their time and their profit margin. A pharmacist seldom takes phone calls at home on holidays for questions or for emergency refills when his business (office) is closed. I am sure he would charge you for his time if he went in and opened up his pharmacy.

I am not sure the doctor's office had to quote the cost of the phone call on the answering machine. (They probably do not charge for what they feel was appropriate use of their emergency phone service). I suspect the office had sent out the change in policy to their patients on their bills or newsletters or by mail prior to the change in policy.

January 3, 2011 at 10:10 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

A lot of these old and spoiled doctors work 80 hour weeks. A lot of them have family obligations and business expenses just like you. All of them have taken thousands of phone calls from their patients without compensation. Most of these doctors have made tremendous sacrifices to work in a profession which used to be admired but is now looked upon as just another service (like your plumber, your street department, etc.). If you do not want to be charged $70 for a phone call, go to urgent care or the ER where the charges will certainly he higher.

January 3, 2011 at 9:44 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Bitter pill

She was notified of the change in practice by the message on the machine before she left the request for phone call from the doctor.

The doctor is taking on liability when he calls in a prescription for you with actually examining you or your children. There have been many lawsuits against doctors for calling in prescriptions in this manner.

Not sure how urgent cares are a "farce" since they are staffed with licensed providers.

It is not part of anyone's job to be available to you at any time day or night without some means of reimbursement for their time. Even the pharmacist will charge you for his time.

January 3, 2011 at 9:30 a.m. ( | suggest removal )