samanthamartin68 (Samantha Martin)

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Update on student apartment project that plans to locate next to day care center

Columbia Mo, saw the problem and stopped issuing permits for student housing within a mile of campus. The proposal cites “unprecedented growth in the construction of off-campus student housing complexes” and MU’s significant enrollment decline for fall 2016 as reasons for the freeze.

City Council freezes downtown development, places tax increases on August ballot
May 16, 2016

https://www.columbiamissourian.com/ne...

Student apartment complex competition is changing Columbia's skyline
Is it too much housing to handle?
November 17, 2016

May 2016, Columbia City Council froze the issuing of construction permits for multi-family housing complexes within one mile of the MU campus until Dec. 1, 2016.
However, Mayor Brian Treece expects the council to extend the moratorium on multi-family construction permits for about six months.

http://www.voxmagazine.com/news/stude...

September 18, 2017 at 1:54 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

HERE apartment complex to pay for Fambrough Drive project, must forgo hundreds of thousands in incentives

David you say you walk by this mess occasionally. I read on the interactive crime map that many serious problems are dealt with by our police department on a regular basis. Why should the city continue to kiss A$s every time somebody from HERE needs to be bailed out for there own mistakes, some of which created on purpose.

Anyway be careful walking by you never know what's about to happen.

August 22, 2017 at 9:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

HERE apartment complex to pay for Fambrough Drive project, must forgo hundreds of thousands in incentives

David you are correct. The county assessor has this monster at less then have of its stated value and won't raise it to fix his own problem. The county has to get the base numbers correct because this property will never pay its full share, with this mistake on the value the taxpayers will never see any meaningful return. The city leader and staff have been taught a lesson by CA Student Venture's and their hired guns.
And the 20 locked off bedrooms out of 628 are meaningless to this owner, it a 3% vacancy rate on beds not units, every rental owner would love for such success. A four bedroom unit could to three tenants leaving the fourth too locked off that is not punishment. Locking off 20 four bedroom units and not allowing then to be leased, that a small penalty but at least it a punishment.

August 22, 2017 at 9:43 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

HERE apartment complex to pay for Fambrough Drive project, must forgo hundreds of thousands in incentives

Rochelle, Thank you.
The city currently owns the right of way where Fambrough Drive is today, what happens to that property when the street is realigned and curves to meet 11th. Is the city ROW following the new alignment of Fambrough Drive or is HERE parking on it.

August 22, 2017 at 10:01 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

HERE apartment complex to pay for Fambrough Drive project, must forgo hundreds of thousands in incentives

Where is the lease between KU and HERE for the parking lot, can the newspaper please supply a link to that document.

August 22, 2017 at 12:31 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

HERE apartment complex to pay for Fambrough Drive project, must forgo hundreds of thousands in incentives

So the new game at city hall is let the HERE Apartment owner do whatever they want if they pretend to pay for it. Remember they already have saved millions of dollars on this project by not building the robotic parking and the taxpayers are subsidizing the rest of the building for years to come.

It's a joke.

August 21, 2017 at 10:33 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Cleanup at former Farmland fertilizer plant may cost city millions more than expected

Trust fund shortfalls hinder progress
October 4, 2009

About a year ago, KDHE revised upward its estimates for cleaning the property by about $7 million. The estimated costs are now $12 million to $15 million over 30 years. Currently, the two trusts have about $10.4 million in them. That’s a shortfall of at least $1.6 million.

But the shortfall may be actually much more than that. The $10.4 million is in two different trust funds. There is only $4.3 million in the remediation fund, which is money set aside to address the most serious environmental issues on the property. The remaining $6.1 million is in an administrative trust fund. Some of that administrative money — but not all — can be used to for cleanup-type purposes at the property.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2009/oct...

August 17, 2017 at 9:30 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Cleanup at former Farmland fertilizer plant may cost city millions more than expected

City leaders to review site plans for former Farmland plant
Funding to convert land to business park on the table
August 15, 2011

Removal of old buildings and equipment at the Farmland site is expected to be completed by late August or early September. But cleanup of the groundwater contamination at the site is expected to take decades — although most of the work is overseeing pumps that remove the nitrogen-laced water, which is later used on farm fields.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/aug...

August 17, 2017 at 9:24 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Cleanup at former Farmland fertilizer plant may cost city millions more than expected

Environmental troubles won’t end even with redevelopment of site
December 8, 2002

In 1995, KDHE ordered Farmland to install a $637,000 system that essentially pumps contaminated water out of the aquifer and into secure, leak-proof, on-site ponds. The pumping activity is designed to ensure the aquifer doesn't become so full that it begins to seep into the Kansas River.

But closure of the plant has created a problem for the plan. Farmland in the past was able to empty the ponds by using the water stored in them as part of its manufacturing process. Now that the plant is no longer producing, the ponds are beginning to fill up.

"The plan is working for now, but if the plant shutdown becomes permanent we may have to evaluate other alternatives," Limesand said.

Limesand said there probably were several feasible alternatives. One is that since the water is essentially diluted fertilizer, the water could be pumped from the ground and sold to farmers who want to use it on their crops.

"It actually may end up having an economic value to someone," Limesand said.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2002/dec...

August 17, 2017 at 9:19 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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