Advertisement

raerae (Rae Hudspeth)

Follow

Comment history

Report: Murder suspect, 19, had knives, guns, hash, ax in victim's car

Yes, who is to say that she wasn't on the run from some other folks involved in the incident?
I had no idea hashish was back to being a popular drug in Kansas!

Another question is raised; a previous article stated the LPD has the alleged murder weapon, but this one says it was found in the car?

January 30, 2014 at 3:06 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Anti-abortion legislator has ultrasounds performed in her Senate committee

Showing sonograms performed at 12 and 24 weeks and making a spectacle of the miracle of life is totally ignoring the fact that most abortions are performed in the first trimester. I challenge any of those legislators to recognize and identify the parts of a fetus visible in a sonogram of that stage of pregnancy. "Waving its little hand at us"? Oh puhleaze.

January 24, 2014 at 12:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

How do you like your eggs?

Farm Fresh and sunny side up!

Or in a quiche, custard, omelette, fritatta, deviled, boiled, scrambled, poached.....

January 23, 2014 at 3:26 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Abortion opponent will have ultrasound done on pregnant woman during committee meeting

I believe that whenever possible, the girl/woman should have the right to make her own decisions about what she is to do with her own body, without the interference of state/church or well-meaning people with their own agendas.
There is not a woman alive who is not aware of what she is terminating, and even that doesn't make anyone sleep any better with all the people standing ready and willing to pass judgement and shame upon her.
If adoptions were as simple as anti-abortion believers would like to think, there would be no need for so many couples to have to journey overseas to secure a baby. And a great many good people who do want to adopt are more often unwilling to take on a child born to a possibly unhealthy, malnourished (thank you, state legislators, for cutting human services) and addicted and/or alcoholic woman.
But you see, the majority of abortions aren't done on young teens, but are actually chosen by married women with children already who have fallen victim to birth control failure and and well, well aware of their decision being the harder yet the more desirable outcome for themselves and their families.

January 23, 2014 at 3:12 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

What’s the best way to celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day?

I watched The Butler and was glad I did. Great movie with plenty of star action and it didn't flinch from the harsh reality that was the civil rights movement. Some parts were hard to watch, even harder for the many many people who lived it.

January 21, 2014 at 11:10 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Extra steps to eat: Creating oases in Lawrence's 'food desert' an ongoing challenge

Thank you for the great articles, Sara. I wish you could have included the current online petition as well..
http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/l...

It's a "hopeful" cause, anyway. I'm surprised that there aren't more of the usual comment posters weighing in on this subject. Either way... Well Done, Sara!

January 21, 2014 at 10:41 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Extra steps to eat: In Lawrence, nearly 18,000 live in federally designated 'food desert'

Keep in mind that for a senior on SSI, with perhaps only a very small budget for food, medicine and necessities, six dollars a trip twice a week is $48 a month. Quite frankly, some people don't have that much wiggle room in a budget. It could mean less food in the belly.
Independence Inc was a no-fee possibility at one time, I don't know if they still do that?
Of course, they and Senior Ride are subsidized by tax dollars and Kansas has put so many cuts on human services like them that I'm not sure they are still able to offer the service as in the past. :(

January 20, 2014 at 11:39 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Extra steps to eat: Creating oases in Lawrence's 'food desert' an ongoing challenge

Spending a couple of hours riding a bus, carrying bags of groceries to and from bus stops, especially fresh or frozen food in half of the hotter months in Kansas is a distinct hardship, and standing with bags of groceries waiting for the bus in inclement weather during the other half is pretty rough as well.

I'm willing to bet that a great many people don't even think about the time and hurdles of hauling groceries on a bus or a long walk. Probably the same people who park as close as they can to the entrance, use a shopping cart to transfer the bags from the store to the car, and think it's an inconvenience when they have to make more than one trip from the driveway to the kitchen because they can't carry everything at once.

A case of soda or a couple gallons of milk isn't easy to tote on and off buses and carry for half a mile, let alone bags of food. There was a time I considered myself very fortunate to have a motorcycle and a pair of saddlebags to tote my groceries the two miles from the store, because I'd already spent a couple of years lugging them onto and off buses, to and from the bus stop.
Was I being "particular" when I had to forgo bringing home even a cheap pint of ice cream, some margarine, or frozen pizzas or pot pies since they be a melted mess by the time I got there?
I couldn't even consider buying anything in bulk to try and save money.. couldn't carry it.
Poor folks get weary of having to ask others for rides so they can buy the eight pack of toilet paper this time.. a case of cheap soda and some freezer items on sale in summer.

January 20, 2014 at 11:29 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Extra steps to eat: In Lawrence, nearly 18,000 live in federally designated 'food desert'

So that's four blocks of walking, two of them with how many bags of a week's worth of groceries in her arms AND watching a small child at the same time.
Sure, that's easy enough!.. not. I suggest we all get an idea of how that feels by parking at the farthest corner of the parking lot and remember to carry all our bags from the checkout to the car.. no cheating and using the shopping cart, you have to carry them on and off a bus, remember? Let's do that once or twice a week, because remember, it takes three to four times longer to make that trip on a bus or walking than it does to hop into your car and drive to the store, so figure it into your available time each week as well. An extra trip because.. oops, you couldn't carry everything you needed on your weekly trip is going to cost you another hour of time just to make two 20 min bus trips and the four block walks for each time you need to "just run out for some milk or bread". Don't forget to take a small child or two along as well, and remember that they get tired and grumpy.
Now consider that trip with a less-abled body, maybe a cane to walk or see with, and an even slower pace of ambulation, or ability to carry more than a sack or two. Ouch.

January 20, 2014 at 3:54 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Extra steps to eat: In Lawrence, nearly 18,000 live in federally designated 'food desert'

I think it's ridiculous to consider the area from N. Iowa to Kasold, all of which is surrounding the Country Club, as "low-income/low-access", and including it as represented in the article. The low access and most likely majority of the low income households are in the apartments behind Dillon's, with a possibility of including the nursing home on Peterson Road skewing the stats only slightly. The USDA map breakdown shows only 34 of 2142 total households(1.6%, not 35% as stated in the article under the breakdown by neighborhood) without vehicles that are more than one-half mile from a supermarket. I wonder if those 34 households are the assisted living quarters, and a few Section 8 duplexes off Peterson road? I know that when I drove for Independence Inc, I used to pick up and drop off a few residents at the grocery store on a regular basis, so they do have access on demand, even if they don't own a vehicle. Obviously, the USDA is unaware of that.

January 20, 2014 at 3:36 a.m. ( | suggest removal )