proforged (brent flanders)

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City moves forward with plan to make residents pay for sidewalk repair

First, in many areas of Lawrence only one side of the street has a sidewalk, so they're responsible while the property across the street is not.

So, a sidewalk on a person's property is a public right-of-way...whether or not the property owner wants this pathway on their property...correct?

Yet, if an individual should trip, fall or have an accident...it is the property owner's responsibility...really?

Did the property owner install or ask for a sidewalk to be placed in front of their property?

This a city/zone issue should be their responsibility, not the property owners.

Is that logic too simple to understand?

October 23, 2016 at 10:46 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kobach calls Trump's stance on election results 'reasonable'

?, you're delusional

October 20, 2016 at 9:19 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kobach calls Trump's stance on election results 'reasonable'

I look forward to your proof, using any scientific / objective data...please spell it out

October 20, 2016 at 9:07 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kobach calls Trump's stance on election results 'reasonable'

- Kansas top election official (Kris Kobach) said Thursday that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was justified in refusing to promise now that he’ll accept the election results, even as the state party chief and a GOP senator on the ballot urged candidates to do so -

I'm pretty much at a loss, as usual, when it comes to Kobach.

Saying anything about his statements, would only lessen my credibility, since they would clearly not be positive.

Comment from John Moe, on the book What's the Matter with Kansas?

"The largely blue collar citizens of Kansas can be counted upon to be a "red" state in any election, voting solidly Republican and possessing a deep animosity toward the left. This, according to author Thomas Frank, is a pretty self-defeating phenomenon, given that the policies of the Republican Party benefit the wealthy and powerful at the great expense of the average worker. According to Frank, the conservative establishment has tricked Kansans, playing up the emotional touchstones of conservatism and perpetuating a sense of a vast liberal empire out to crush traditional values while barely ever discussing the Republicans' actual economic policies and what they mean to the working class. Thus the pro-life Kansas factory worker who listens to Rush Limbaugh will repeatedly vote for the party that is less likely to protect his safety, less likely to protect his job, and less likely to benefit him economically. To much of America, Kansas is an abstract, "where Dorothy wants to return. Where Superman grew up." But Frank, a native Kansan, separates reality from myth in What's the Matter with Kansas and tells the state's socio-political history from its early days as a hotbed of leftist activism to a state so entrenched in conservatism that the only political division remaining is between the moderate and more-extreme right wings of the same party. Frank, the founding editor of The Baffler and a contributor to Harper's and The Nation, knows the state and its people. He even includes his own history as a young conservative idealist turned disenchanted college Republican, and his first-hand experience, combined with a sharp wit and thorough reasoning, makes his book more credible than the elites of either the left and right who claim to understand Kansas."

October 20, 2016 at 7:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City to develop its first comprehensive parking plan

No study is needed.

Simply fly to Chicago (or other major city) and visualize/understand how they use technology to handle "real" downtown parking issues.

This is 2016, the technologies available and convenience provided to both the community (parkers) and the city are ridiculously obvious.

September 11, 2016 at 8:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

The ins and outs of a proposed increase in parking fines for downtown Lawrence

How about an upgraded parking meter system? A parking meter that accepts credit cards or change. I believe that Lawrence parking is a bargain vs. most cities, already. But, if the city offered a new digital/credit card option, they could charge a $1 per hour vs. 25 cents for 30 minutes (I think that is the current rate) and most people wouldn't blink because they always carry plastic but not always change. Additionally they could accept a late fee at the meter with plastic, and recognize the revenue immediately.

February 4, 2016 at 9:54 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

DREAM ON! KU volleyball reaches Final Four

Fantastic. The early accolades surrounding this team were apparently - spot on. A Final Four berth in any sport is an extremely difficult dream to fulfill, these Jayhawks have done it. Thanks for allowing us to be along on this incredible ride.

December 13, 2015 at 11:09 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Fans stand by Kansas State marching band after controversial halftime show, donate thousands of dollars

Come on, it's a college rivalry prank. Despite being a diehard Jayhawk (1984), is this not what collegiate life is supposed to be?

September 11, 2015 at 11:39 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Doug Compton's latest project and the debate over downtown parking; high tech traffic solutions presented to City Hall

Michelle, I certainly respect your response...it's one of the things that makes a forum of this nature so valuable - getting to express one's opinions. I understand your comments regarding the original design and placement of our building, of which I was not aware...nevertheless valid (although we do have private underground parking for all residents). The one comment that is incorrect is the allowance of a grocery store in the former Border's building, I know for a fact that a minimum of 3 potential buyers for the building were all grocery businesses prior to Compton's purchase (currently a gourmet grocery store is allowed in the OEA). All that needs changed to allow any grocery store is one clause in the original OEA approved by the Hobbs Taylor HOA, which would occur.

May 21, 2015 at 12:07 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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