proforged (brent flanders)

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Comment history

Tom Keegan: Jayhawks fail pivotal test to prove themselves

Tom, although I don't think you mean to disrespect the program, I think this comment is simply not necessary -- "at least there’s basketball” --

Don't be that person at a party that has to use your refrain. The crater this program inherited was immense.

September 9, 2017 at 10:37 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Jayhawks' 2018 recruiting class grows to six late Saturday night

Have been impressed with coach Beaty from the outset. The flaming crater he inherited was a rebuilding project much larger than the casual KU (or other) fan probably recognized. Now, the overall makeup of the entire coaching staff, combined with continued outstanding recruiting, keeps our optimism flowing. We have already re-upped our family's ticket package, I hope more get onboard.

February 5, 2017 at 11:55 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Streak Stopped: Jayhawks slip against Iowa State, suffer first home loss

"So today you had a tie game. At least as far as I feel. This "overtime" to stretch the game past the regulation time (or innings) is a fraud for the players who performed equally well in regulation time."

So, you want a sports events to end in a tie?

Really? I'm pretty sure that the majority of sports fans would prefer an outcome vs. a tie.

Even though I'm a huge english football fan, I'd prefer a PK shootout vs. a tie.

February 4, 2017 at 9:08 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

'It’s the impact you have on people’s lives': Retiring KU professor invented widely used drugs for HIV and other conditions

Mr. Fellows, do not confuse the efforts and brilliance of Dr. Stella with factors that are outside of his or your control. Instead, be proud of a KU professor (one of which I was proud to have been a product of, as a pharmacist) in Dr. Valentino Stella.

Dr. Stella, we are all grateful.

December 27, 2016 at 8:52 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City moves forward with plan to make residents pay for sidewalk repair

First, in many areas of Lawrence only one side of the street has a sidewalk, so they're responsible while the property across the street is not.

So, a sidewalk on a person's property is a public right-of-way...whether or not the property owner wants this pathway on their property...correct?

Yet, if an individual should trip, fall or have an accident...it is the property owner's responsibility...really?

Did the property owner install or ask for a sidewalk to be placed in front of their property?

This a city/zone issue should be their responsibility, not the property owners.

Is that logic too simple to understand?

October 23, 2016 at 10:46 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kobach calls Trump's stance on election results 'reasonable'

?, you're delusional

October 20, 2016 at 9:19 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kobach calls Trump's stance on election results 'reasonable'

I look forward to your proof, using any scientific / objective data...please spell it out

October 20, 2016 at 9:07 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kobach calls Trump's stance on election results 'reasonable'

- Kansas top election official (Kris Kobach) said Thursday that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was justified in refusing to promise now that he’ll accept the election results, even as the state party chief and a GOP senator on the ballot urged candidates to do so -

I'm pretty much at a loss, as usual, when it comes to Kobach.

Saying anything about his statements, would only lessen my credibility, since they would clearly not be positive.

Comment from John Moe, on the book What's the Matter with Kansas?

"The largely blue collar citizens of Kansas can be counted upon to be a "red" state in any election, voting solidly Republican and possessing a deep animosity toward the left. This, according to author Thomas Frank, is a pretty self-defeating phenomenon, given that the policies of the Republican Party benefit the wealthy and powerful at the great expense of the average worker. According to Frank, the conservative establishment has tricked Kansans, playing up the emotional touchstones of conservatism and perpetuating a sense of a vast liberal empire out to crush traditional values while barely ever discussing the Republicans' actual economic policies and what they mean to the working class. Thus the pro-life Kansas factory worker who listens to Rush Limbaugh will repeatedly vote for the party that is less likely to protect his safety, less likely to protect his job, and less likely to benefit him economically. To much of America, Kansas is an abstract, "where Dorothy wants to return. Where Superman grew up." But Frank, a native Kansan, separates reality from myth in What's the Matter with Kansas and tells the state's socio-political history from its early days as a hotbed of leftist activism to a state so entrenched in conservatism that the only political division remaining is between the moderate and more-extreme right wings of the same party. Frank, the founding editor of The Baffler and a contributor to Harper's and The Nation, knows the state and its people. He even includes his own history as a young conservative idealist turned disenchanted college Republican, and his first-hand experience, combined with a sharp wit and thorough reasoning, makes his book more credible than the elites of either the left and right who claim to understand Kansas."

October 20, 2016 at 7:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City to develop its first comprehensive parking plan

No study is needed.

Simply fly to Chicago (or other major city) and visualize/understand how they use technology to handle "real" downtown parking issues.

This is 2016, the technologies available and convenience provided to both the community (parkers) and the city are ridiculously obvious.

September 11, 2016 at 8:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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