oooreally1234 (Katie Dennis)

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Opinion: McBudget is insult to working poor

Some of the "waiters" or "checkers" went to college and have degrees and probably CAN DO what you do, but there aren't jobs in that field anymore, so they take whatever they can get. They have monstrous student loan debt and live way below the poverty line with an education that ten or fifteen years ago would have guaranteed them a job. You work 7 days a week, 2 jobs and you still can't make ends meet. There's something terribly wrong with that. I work with several people with Masters degrees who are "checkers." Check yourself before you talk about an experience that you've clearly never had.

July 29, 2013 at 1 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence ranked sixth best metro area for work-life balance, according to new report

HAHA what the heck? I have a college degree and work 2 jobs and barely squeak by. The median wage in this town compared to the cost of living is ridiculous! Lawrence may have a work life balance because you can hardly find a full time job with benefits!

July 25, 2013 at 10:19 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Plans for new downtown hotel and apartment building shrink

So are you suggesting that because some in the community would like to see a grocery store on this lot but do not have the funds to do it themselves that they can't have an opinion about what should go there? I'm a college graduate with a full time job. I work hard, but I can't 'put my money where my mouth is' because I'm paying student loans. I love this city, it's my home. I'd love to see a grocery store go in there, but I can't just go buy the lot from Doug Compton (or whoever owns it). If everyone that couldn't buy the lot and develop it let everyone that could do whatever they wanted, this whole town would be luxury hotels, restaurants and apartments. So people without money aren't entitled to an opinion about their own community?

December 7, 2011 at 7:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Plans for new downtown hotel and apartment building shrink

what?! First the giant building next to the parking structure and now a luxury hotel/apartment building right across the street?! Who is going to live there?! The Eldridge and The Oread, plus Hobbs Taylor and the 901 apartments, seem like more than enough meet the demand for luxury hotels/apts. Do we really need another one? It's not that big of a town.

December 7, 2011 at 7:32 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence version of Occupy Wall Street protest springs up

Is this a joke? Do you honestly think Wall St. and the banks only affect those with money in stocks? It controls our economy! The government is in bed with Wall St. and the banks. The government took OUR tax dollars, that should go to pay for the government to run, build infrastructure, fund schools and provide services to the public, and instead bailed out these big banks with OUR money! My tax dollars are given to fat cats on Wall Street, while I can't get affordable health care even though I work 40 hours a week! Of course it affects us! You're nuts if you think otherwise.

October 9, 2011 at 9:17 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City adopts tougher penalties for landlords who violate city code for single-family homes

thanks none2. I grew up in small town and when I graduated I decided to stay in Lawrence. KC was too big for me, I didn't want to live in the suburbs and Lawrence fits just right. I work hard and I'd love to invest in my community and I believe I can do that without owning a home. Unfortunately, home ownership for "young children" like me is far away in terms of my financial future. It's disheartening to be stereotyped as a "young child" because I want to rent a home, live with roommates and be responsible and take care of the property. The irresponsible, young college students that do cause problems in your neighborhoods are a gross misrepresentation of most young people living in this city. I don't stereotype "your" generation as a generation of uppity, snobbish, whiners who ruined our economy during a period of rampant deregulation and tax cuts. I understand there are issues with the way housing works in this city, but don't lump all citizens under 35-40 into some troublesome category. I spend my hard earned dollars in this city and I'm doing what I can to give back. Give folks a break.

October 6, 2011 at 6:09 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City adopts tougher penalties for landlords who violate city code for single-family homes

thanks none2. I grew up in small town and when I graduated I decided to stay in Lawrence. KC was too big for me, I didn't want to live in the suburbs and Lawrence fits just right. I work hard and I'd love to invest in my community and I believe I can do that without owning a home. Unfortunately, home ownership for "young children" like me is far away in terms of my financial future. It's disheartening to be stereotyped as a "young child" because I want to rent a home, live with roommates and be responsible and take care of the property. The irresponsible, young college students that do cause problems in your neighborhoods are a gross misrepresentation of most young people living in this city. I don't stereotype "your" generation as a generation of uppity, snobbish, whiners who ruined our economy during a period of rampant deregulation and tax cuts. I understand there are issues with the way housing works in this city, but don't lump all citizens under 35-40 into some troublesome category. I spend my hard earned dollars in this city and I'm doing what I can to give back. Give folks a break.

October 6, 2011 at 6:09 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City adopts tougher penalties for landlords who violate city code for single-family homes

I do believe this has a lot to do with it. As the ordinances were already in place, but now they're just "cracking down?" Seems like a little pressure from said "boyz" is taking effect.

October 5, 2011 at 9:35 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City adopts tougher penalties for landlords who violate city code for single-family homes

1. I lived in the "student ghetto" for two years, as well as East Lawrence and a home on Naismith. I'm not sure if those are zoned for single family homes, but the East Lawrence home was where I had to "hide" my room mate.

2. Too bad us "young children" probably won't be making any large investments in our neighborhoods because even with a college degree and beyond adequate work experience, it's increasingly difficult to find a job that pays enough to afford home ownership along with student loans. Also, you don't know how old I am. Don't assume someone is young because they're just out of college and unmarried. While I have seen some reasonably priced homes and it's possible that a mortgage payment would be less than rent, I'm not buying a home until my job is secure and I know I'll be there for a while and right now I'm not willing to make that large of an investment. That doesn't make me any less "invested" in my neighborhood. Our generation might be a generation of renters for a very long time.

3. I agree with peartree. My father was a contractor for 25 years and was appalled at most places I lived in. The conditions of these homes are absurd and yes it is sad that beautiful neighborhoods, which students and homeowners alike can contribute to, are becoming dilapidated pits. JOY REALTY is one example. I looked at a few of her properties and I was shocked at the state of these places. She rents a property on Ohio street that looks condemned and she charges an ridiculous amount of rent. A few of her properties, from what I can tell, remain unrented and I can only imagine it's because of the terrible condition they are in. Or take Connecticut street for example. Some of the homes on that street are beautiful, while others resemble a haunted house. I agree, stricter rules for actual property owners/slumlords, instead of "punishing" those just trying to work hard and pay affordable rent.

October 5, 2011 at 6:11 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City adopts tougher penalties for landlords who violate city code for single-family homes

thank you! I went to KU and lived in the "student ghetto" with 9 other non-related girls. No crazy parties were thrown, we needed cheap rent, close to campus. We didn't want to take a bus or drive to campus from West Lawrence or out by Walmart. We wanted to walk to school. What's wrong with that? I graduated, but since I'm not married with kids and I still work in Lawrence, I need roommates and (still) cheap rent. I had to hide my last roommate from my landlord because we were violating the rental agreement. Neither one of us could afford rent, even with full time jobs. We needed to share a place. This is the LAST thing the city should be picking on in economic times like these. BOO HOO Lawrence residents, you live in a college town! It was a college town before you moved here/you were born and will be after you die. Get over it. That's what happens. Some of us "non-permanent" residents fall in love with this town and decide they want to stay and make it our home. If we don't get hitched and pop out some kids, I guess we're going to be consigned to big apartment complexes out in West and South Lawrence. I thought Lawrence was supposed to be "progressive" but this is stone aged, come on. If you're not a family, you're not welcome in our neighborhood. Yes, it's hyperbole, but it sure is the vibe I'm feeling from the City.

October 5, 2011 at 12:18 p.m. ( | suggest removal )