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U.S. Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage could affect Kansas

Yeah, the Voting Rights Act - how'd that do in the Supreme Court recently?

July 1, 2013 at 1:49 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Retirement home residents sue Kobach over law requiring photo ID to vote

"Lawing said both Hamner and Spry live in a retirement home and neither had access to birth records necessary to secure a picture ID. He said they also don’t have driver’s licenses, computers or the resources to apply for a free state ID."

There are no computers in the retirement home? And they never go anywhere like the library?

It doesn't matter anyway. When Missouri first passed a voter ID law, they even purchased a number of specialized vans that traveled around the state TO such places as retirement homes so voters could get a state-issued picture ID without going anywhere or paying a dime. That still wasn't enough to make people happy.

July 1, 2013 at 1:44 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Retirement home residents sue Kobach over law requiring photo ID to vote

How good of you to notice (something it appears few others have done). The allegation that the Republican party is trying to suppress the vote of one of their most secure voting blocks doesn't make a lot of sense now, does it?

July 1, 2013 at 1:39 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Advocates for gay rights still face long road to marriage equality in Kansas

"For example, will the IRS for tax purposes recognize same-sex marriages if the couple has moved to a state that doesn't allow same-sex marriage, Witt asked."

Not sure where his confusion is coming from. Two sentences from the ruling:

"DOMA contains two operative sections: Section 2, which has not been challenged here, allows States to refuse to recognize same-sex marriages performed under the laws of other States."

and

"This opinion and its holding are confined to those lawful marriages."

Seems pretty sorted out to me.

July 1, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

New study ranks Lawrence ninth smartest city in the country

Perhaps meant as a joke, but not too far off the mark. There are certain forms of intelligence that don't show up very well on standardized instruments. I know carpenters and contractors that can glance at a blueprint and immediately see how many board-feet of 2x4's they're going to need, but they might not score highly on the math section of an assessment. I also know a mason who can walk through a quarry and know just by sight exactly which stones he needs for a project and where they're going to fit, but he doesn't have any formal education in geometry or engineering.

But gnome is correct - without random selection of participants, the results reported in these rankings are not generalizable at all. It could merely mean that Lawrence's recent college grads have too much time on their hands since they can't get a job, while the so-called 'not as smart' contingent is off working for a living.

June 27, 2013 at 10:55 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

U.S. Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage could affect Kansas

Not being negative, just musing - IMHO, the Court punted this one - they pretty much completely ignored (in both cases) the issue of whether or not there's a constitutional right to marriage. I'm not surprised at all that Kennedy sided with the liberal members, because he didn't really rule along liberal lines - he ruled (correctly) that the states, not the feds, get to decide how to define marriage.

Which brings up an interesting thought: I'm not one of these slippery slope folks who say now people will be marrying dogs or trees - but suppose, just as a purely academic exercise, that the state of Utah passed a law tomorrow recognizing polygamy - according to this ruling, wouldn't the federal government have to recognize those marriages as well? How would that work? Would they be able to file a joint tax return with twelve spouses (and 30 or 40 kids) on it? Would all 5 or 10 wives be entitled to survivor benefits? Again, just musing ...

June 27, 2013 at 1:31 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

U.S. Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage could affect Kansas

CALIFORNIA CONSTITUTION
ARTICLE 3 STATE OF CALIFORNIA

SEC. 3.5. An administrative agency, including an administrative
agency created by the Constitution or an initiative statute, has no
power:
(a) To declare a statute unenforceable, or refuse to enforce a
statute, on the basis of it being unconstitutional unless an
appellate court has made a determination that such statute is
unconstitutional;
(b) To declare a statute unconstitutional;
(c) To declare a statute unenforceable, or to refuse to enforce a
statute on the basis that federal law or federal regulations prohibit
the enforcement of such statute unless an appellate court has made a
determination that the enforcement of such statute is prohibited by
federal law or federal regulations.

http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/.const/.art...

I think both sides have an argument there. In any event, like I said, I agree that they'll most likely go ahead and act as if it's already been declared unconstitutional, even though the 9th Circuit's ruling was vacated.

June 27, 2013 at 1:22 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

U.S. Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage could affect Kansas

Coin toss. Either they stop enforcing it immediately and someone sues saying they can't do that, or else they hold off until someone sues (again) to have it overturned and it reaches the appellate level. Either way the final decision could be years away. My bet is they'll stop enforcing it now, and the 9th Circuit won't issue an injunction while they're waiting for a decision, so for all intent and purposes that one is probably an immediate (or near immediate) win for same sex marriage.

June 27, 2013 at 1:02 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

U.S. Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage could affect Kansas

You may also be prematurely celebrating the change in California. Since the Supreme Court threw out the 9th Circuit's decision, there IS no appellate ruling on Prop 8, and California law requires an appellate ruling before a law is set aside.

June 27, 2013 at 12:44 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

U.S. Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage could affect Kansas

The ruling had nothing to do with marriage "equality". It had to do with the states' right to define marriage, whether "equal" or not. The states where same-sex marriages were already legal gained very little - federal tax and survivor benefits, and not much else. In states where same-sex marriages were illegal (about three quarters of the country), nothing whatsoever has changed - especially as, as you pointed out yourself, the full faith and credit clause does not apply to marriage. You can celebrate if you want - but despite Mr. Rothschild's rather wishful thinking, not a single thing has changed in Kansas.

June 27, 2013 at 12:41 a.m. ( | suggest removal )