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Professor getting death threats over NRA tweet, colleagues support his free-speech rights

I don't know if English is your native language, but that's not what he said. He said that people who value their gun lifestyle or their countrymen's lives might get their priorities straight if the lost lives were actually dear to them, and not just strangers whose deaths they could sweep under the rug. So, the next time someone shoots up a public place (not that anyone hopes it will happen, but let's be realistic), he hopes that the innocent people who die (not that he hopes they die, but he's realistic enough to know that people will) happen to be relatives of people who lobby against common sense safety regulations, so that these blockers can get a true sense of the problem.

The "outrage" from the pro-gun crowd is precisely a reaction to the fact that this tweet reminds them of their backwards priorities. When you point out someone's moral failings, they always react viciously, and interpret what people say in self-serving ways that feed their confirmation bias.

September 24, 2013 at 9:31 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Professor getting death threats over NRA tweet, colleagues support his free-speech rights

Honestly, I bet they put Prof. Guth on leave in the hopes that no one would come to the campus to shoot him.

September 24, 2013 at 9:20 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Retail sales in city starting to slip, latest report finds

For those talking about the killer sales taxes... Lawrence's really isn't that high compared to its neighbors.

Lawrence: 8.75%, only 1.55% of which comes from the city.
Topeka: 8.8%.
Kansas City KS: 9.7% to 10.75%.
Overland Park: 8.5% (Oak Park Mall is 9.0% with its special district).
Lenexa: 8.75%.
Leavenworth: 8.15%.

If you spent $500 in each place, the sales tax would be:

Lawrence: $43.75.
Topeka: $44.00.
K City: $48.50 (at the lower rate, $53.75 at the higher).
O Park: $42.50 (Oak Park Mall: $45.00).
Lenexa: $43.75.
L'worth: $40.75.

Two conclusions:
1) Good luck comparison shopping on that basis! Any tax savings would be more than wiped out by added fuel and time spent.
2) People might shop out of Lawrence for a number of reasons, but sales tax is not one of them. Let's lay the tax bogeyman to rest.

September 2, 2013 at 9:02 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Retail sales in city starting to slip, latest report finds

Really? Can you say more about these? I'm asking as a new resident interested in local history.

September 2, 2013 at 8:42 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Former KU wide receiver Omigie arrested in robbery case that ensnared Chris Martin

All that for some cash and pot? I guess that shows the football team isn't just given these things...

August 13, 2013 at 9:20 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Editorial: Wrong direction

"Something has to be cut!" No, it doesn't. There are two ways to balance your budget--- cut spending, or get a raise and pony up the scratch. Conservatives never mention the second option, because they want to pretend it doesn't exist, because "taxes = bad", or some other empty juvenile catchphrase. But it does.

July 18, 2013 at 9:50 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Editorial: Wrong direction

I think that Brownback's attempt to be more Texas than Texas is doomed to fail. You can't beat Texas at their own game. Because what does Kansas offer that Texas doesn't? Texas has no income tax at all... but even if Kansas doesn't, who would bring their business here instead of there? Texas has six times the population (i.e. a far larger local market and employee pool), two major airports, a world-class port, four of the largest metros in the US, even a liberal tech hub in Austin (which is Texas's 8th largest city, yet twice as large as Wichita). It has 8 major league sports teams to buy corporate suites at, to Kansas's none. It has a large influx of migrants from South and North, and a ton of tourists as well. The free market speaks clearly, and it speaks for Texas.

Oh, and even during the big recession, Texas invested heavily in its state universities to raise more of them to R-1 status. That investment is going to pay them dividends for years to come.

July 18, 2013 at 9:46 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

KU, all regents schools seek tuition, fee increases

The legislature didn't want to cut the budget; the legislature wanted to pass the cost of the state's university from the state to the students, even though it's the entire state that benefits from building and maintaining the institution (it's not the "University of Tuition-paying students", after all).

As for why the university would want to make up for the loss in state funding... well, it's called competition in a free market: If a team doesn't pay for talent, the talent will go to a team that can pay. Read up on the Miami Marlins if you want a more obvious example, since the results there are immediate and published in every day's sports pages. Now that the economy is picking back up in the areas that affect university budgets (tax revenues are up, endowments are growing again), while KU cuts, other schools will grow, and leave Kansas in the dust.

It's the state's university--- your university--- and its quality depends on you. If you're not willing to pony up for the quality, you can't expect to get it.

June 8, 2013 at 11:02 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Would you rather have a lower income tax and higher sales tax, or lower sales tax and higher income tax?

yeah, double taxation is a myth people use as an excuse to get out of doing their duty to their state or country. As has been pointed out, monetary transactions between two parties are taxed. Also, money is completely fungible, so you can't really say that this particular dollar gets taxed multiple times.

May 19, 2013 at 8:44 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Would you rather have a lower income tax and higher sales tax, or lower sales tax and higher income tax?

You can buy things online or in other states. I know you're supposed to pay a use tax on that stuff, but it's purely self-declared so it's even easier to get out of than income tax.

May 19, 2013 at 8:40 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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