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Transportation secretary makes case that cable barriers are no 'silver bullet,' but announces meetings to study their effectiveness on K-10

As an ardent supporter of a cable barrier on K-10, I had never thought of this and support it as a much safer alternative.

I am curious as to if there are any places in the US where these have been implemented?

April 30, 2011 at 9:02 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas Highway Patrol investigates whether drugs contributed to double-fatality Saturday afternoon on K-10

I completely agree with you about what is the real problem behind these K-10 accidents, but you have no idea about risk management and how it works, and how it is implemented in nearly every aspect of our lives.

I work in a field that deals with risks and threats of many types, we have to consider what we can control and what we cannot control.

If we can control something we take measures to do so and alleviate that risk.

If we cannot control something, we find ways to either live with the risk or we take measures to keep that risk from affecting us.

Now, how does one decide whether to live with the risk or to take measures against it? You look at what is at stake. If the risk is "low" we may do nothing at all and just monitor it, especially if it is cost or functionally prohibitive. If the risk is "moderate" we may take greater measures to secure it and protect it, but we keep the cost of protecting it in mind. If the risk is "high", meaning that lives are at stake, then we do what we have to to protect it, regardless of the cost sometimes. We don't do one thing, we do all things necessary. A very simplistic view.

This situation falls in the last category. Lives are at stake. Some of the problems we can control. Increased LE would be nice. Heftier fines for violation would be a good deterrent. I support both of those ideas. But I also support a barrier, because when the first two fail, if you have a reasonable solution that will probably work, you should implement it, when lives are at stake.

April 18, 2011 at 10:53 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas Highway Patrol investigates whether drugs contributed to double-fatality Saturday afternoon on K-10

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

April 18, 2011 at 10:43 p.m. ( )

Kansas Highway Patrol investigates whether drugs contributed to double-fatality Saturday afternoon on K-10

Chances of him hitting a car going the same direction AFTER hitting a cable or concrete barrier on this highway are slim to none.

You don't seem very smart so I will spell it out for you. Car leaves highway, enters grass median. Grass will slow down a vehicle considerably before striking either concrete or cable median. If concrete, yes car could ricochet and reenter similarly oriented traffic, but since you wouldn't put a concrete barrier, we must assume it is a cable barrier. Moving forward with cable barrier. Grass causes deceleration, and depending on the angle at which the car strikes the barrier, the vehicle will slow down even more, not taking into account any damage done to drive train or tires after crossing uneven grass median and striking steel cables and poles.

So lets assume, that physics is wrong and the car somehow "bounces" off of the cable barrier and enters traffic, people behind him would have most likely seen this miracle of physics and moved away. And even if they didn't and the car had enough energy to come to rest in the same road it just left, a car could in theory strike the stationary car and a collision of an effective 70 to 80 MPH would result.

Now, even though the likelihood of this is so slim as to be nearly impossible, we should compare the resulting accident of 70 -80 MPH with the relative speed of a head on collision resulting from a median crossing on K-10 which would be, most likely 110 to 160 MPH. (Hint: Add the possible speeds of the two cars together to get the true speed and force of the collision.)

Again, hopefully you could follow that, though I doubt that you could follow Sesame Street.

April 18, 2011 at 10:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback signs Kris Kobach's bill requiring photo ID at polls

Oh you mean the ACORN scandal? The one that was proven to be a hoax. The scandal based on the highly edited video suited for devouring by the Conservative media frenzy?

The harm is if it turns any legitimate voter away. The harm is if one legitimate vote isn't counted. The harm is the increased spending in a time when we are told to tighten our belts.

April 18, 2011 at 5:44 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback signs Kris Kobach's bill requiring photo ID at polls

Ding ding ding.

The problem is the average Kansas (the people who voted for Brownback and Kobach) have zero idea what you are talking about. They don't know that the real threat to voting is the crappy hardware and software used at polling stations to count votes.

Brownback and Kobach have the idiots fooled. Too bad the idiots outnumber the rest of us.

"How many a$%holes do we have on this ship?"
"YO!"
"I knew it, I'm surrounded by a$%holes....Keep firing a$%holes!"

April 18, 2011 at 5:40 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Two dead, three with serious injuries after accident on Kansas Highway 10 near Eudora

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

April 17, 2011 at 9:08 p.m. ( )

Kansas law change may allow even blind to carry concealed

I would like to see some proof of your first statement. I would wager you have none or you are misunderstanding a source. The ATF is training the Mexicans to identify these weapons so that they can be traced back to sources in the US.

According to a recent report by the Wilson Center, the most common firearm seized in Mexico that has been traced back to the US is the AK-47 and AR-15 semi-automatic clones. The most common of the two rifles are the Romanian AK and the Bushmaster AR-15. Neither used by the ATF.

Of 75,000 firearms seized in Mexico in the last three years, 80% came from the United States, according to the Mexican gov't.

Your statement about the ATF, is just plain ignorant.
http://www.wilsoncenter.org/news/docs...

February 13, 2011 at 4:49 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Jayhawks good, entertaining, too

Lamest comment ever. Pretty much up to par for you though.

February 13, 2011 at 8:33 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigns, hands power to military

rockchalk and snap, you are so stupid there really aren't words to express it.

Why was the Shah overthrown? Who created the conditions for the rise of the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Until you two are able to actually gain the knowledge about events in history perhaps you should keep your fat mouths shut about said events in history.

We created the situation in Iran, everyone knows this. We allowed our Interests to outweigh our Ideals and the result was disastrous. Those times need to come to an end.

Democracy prevailed in what turned out to be a somewhat bloodless revolution, in spite of our government's luke warm support for the democracy loving demonstrators. Shame on our government, and shame on you.

February 11, 2011 at 9:59 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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