merrill (Richard Heckler)

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Paul Davis launches bid for 2nd District congressional seat in Kansas

Republicans don't have republicans to vote for. The problem for republicans is created by this phoney republican organization.

Pay close attention to this 24/7 organized activity: American Legislative Exchange Council Boot Camp Team http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2...

And to this republican position:Right to Work Law = No worker Rights
http://www.rightwingwatch.org/report/...

August 16, 2017 at 6:49 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to review incentives request for downtown grocery store

Lawrence is a small town yet has 15 grocery stores. 9 of which are like next door to each other. 5 are in the northwest corner and 4 in the southeast corner. Can we say no planning whatsoever? I say contact the owners of Tanger Mall and ask them to use their money to create space for a grocery store. Then provide
a grocery store with owner provided incentives = new concept.

"Bill Fleming, an attorney who represents the development group, told the commission that the loan is needed to make the project work.

“There’s a lot of things that we’re trying to do to make the numbers work too, but at the end of the day the grocery store has to make a reasonable return on their money,” Fleming said. “Otherwise they’re not going to be interested in doing the project.”

When developers say they cannot make money on a project without the reckless spending of our tax dollars to guarantee them a profit the answer to that situation is " hey developer don't build it"

For the past 25 years Lawrence has been over building residential and retail based on what might happen = speculation. Lawrence is not that big. Lawrence has been building and blowing tax dollars as if Lawrence has a tax base of the Kansas City metro.

Excellent paying jobs have taken a back seat to over building residential and retail. This must be supply side wreckanomics.

Want to improve the lifestyles for all of Lawrence in every neighborhood? Dedicate millions of tax dollars annually to the Walkable Community and Compete Streets Project. Yes put the taxpayers tax dollars in the tax payers neighborhoods. Thank you.

August 16, 2017 at 6:33 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission accepts incentives application for downtown grocery and apartments

Lawrence is a small town yet has 15 grocery stores. 9 of which are like next door to each other. 5 are in the northwest corner and 4 in the southeast corner. Can we say no planning whatsoever? I say contact the owners of Tanger Mall and ask them to use their money to create space for a grocery store. Then provide
a grocery store with owner provided incentives = new concept.

"Bill Fleming, an attorney who represents the development group, told the commission that the loan is needed to make the project work.

“There’s a lot of things that we’re trying to do to make the numbers work too, but at the end of the day the grocery store has to make a reasonable return on their money,” Fleming said. “Otherwise they’re not going to be interested in doing the project.”

When developers say they cannot make money on a project without the reckless spending of our tax dollars to guarantee them a profit the answer to that situation is " hey developer don't build it"

For the past 25 years Lawrence has been over building residential and retail based on what might happen = speculation. Lawrence is not that big. Lawrence has been building and blowing tax dollars as if Lawrence has a tax base of the Kansas City metro.

Excellent paying jobs have taken a back seat to over building residential and retail. This must be supply side wreckanomics.

Want to improve the lifestyles for all of Lawrence in every neighborhood? Dedicate millions of tax dollars annually to the Walkable Community and Compete Streets Project. Yes put the taxpayers tax dollars in the tax payers neighborhoods. Thank you.

August 16, 2017 at 6:17 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission accepts incentives application for downtown grocery and apartments

Reckless planning/spending is draining our pocketbooks and raising our taxes.

Why does city government protect the real estate industry executives instead of taxpayers?

There is one consequence that usually goes unmentioned - developers are draining our pocketbooks and raising our taxes.

How can local government increase rates, fees which are essentially taxes in addition to increasing taxes then give away these taxes to a for profit industry?

Reckless spending is the result of over four decades of subsidies paid for by the local taxpayer. The subsidies range from the obvious to the obscure.

Reckless spending definitely wastes our tax money. This project represents economic displacement which prevents solid and consistent economic growth.

Economic displacement prevents economic growth.

Where does the money for all this come from? It is the largest group of stakeholders in the community aka the taxpayers who make up the difference.

The bottom line is that new development is costing the largest group of tax paying stakeholders money.

One more time economic displacement prevents economic growth.

August 16, 2017 at 5:29 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to review incentives request for downtown grocery store

This new grocery store area houses a generous population of students who often eat out in addition to doing some home cooking.

How is the not necessarily convenient intersection of 7th and New Hampshire going to manage traffic with the new apartments and a grocery store? This might become one of those intersections to avoid.

Will this new grocery store actually eliminate the perceived "Food Desert"? NO

Why does planning allow so many grocery stores in some areas kind of like a flood?

Mass Street Dillon's, Checkers, 23rd Street Dillon's and Natural Grocers are grouped together. The 6th and Lawrence Dillon's will also impact a new "downtown" grocery store.

Then comes the group 6th and Lawrence Dillon's, 6th Street Hyvee, 6th and Wakarusa Dillon's, 6th and Wakrusa Wal-mart and 6th and Wakrusa Sprouts.

In essence these two groups in such close proximity to each other not only created food deserts but also economic displacement. Why did this happen?

August 14, 2017 at 2 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to review incentives request for downtown grocery store

The term “food desert” isn’t without its own problems. First, and perhaps most importantly, this neighborhood-based concept doesn’t reflect how people actually live: many shoppers travel beyond the store closest to home, and this includes low-income and limited-mobility households.

By drawing lines around an area (typically using administrative boundaries, like Census tracts), we’re dramatically abstracting the notion of access.

Another issue is that the desert metaphor adopts a deficit orientation. It’s possible that a neighborhood has a thriving urban garden system, or a robust network of curbside produce vendors, but no supermarket. By naming a place a food desert, we might overlook or obscure important community food assets.

Nevertheless, as a planning researcher, I find some utility in the term. Many low-income households want to shop at supermarkets, just as higher-income people.

Alternative models, such as farmers’ markets, cooperative groceries, and urban agriculture may all play a role (or, more likely, many roles) in terms of food access, mental and physical wellness, and community development. Yet they are hardly a replacement for the supermarket model that most American households use without issue.

The food desert concept can focus attention, and more importantly political, social, and economic capital, to one type of community development.

Indeed, supermarkets are major vehicle of the industrial food system; in many cases, they are also what low-income communities ask for. This is worth much further exploration, but I offer it here to suggest that these dynamics aren’t straightforward or simple.

When a new supermarket opens, do smaller stores close? This is often the fear, and sometimes the case. If so, what is the impact of these closures, both in terms of economic and social outcomes?

This isn’t the first time planners have advocated for supermarkets as elements of downtown revitalization. What lessons have we learned (or should we learn) from history?

What are some of the “false positives” that result from the food desert definition? For instance, where are places we call food deserts, but, in fact, are not? Is this because a network of smaller stores effectively fills in?

Alternatively, what about “false negatives?” Are there areas with supermarkets that are still poorly served? Is the quality of a neighborhood supermarket so bad that nobody considers it a viable option?

Or, more provocative: how much does access matter when shoppers are poor (i.e., isn’t this just a poverty issue)?

http://plan4health.us/defining-food-d...

August 14, 2017 at 1:32 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to review incentives request for downtown grocery store

Philadelphia grocer Jeff Brown has opened supermarkets in neighborhoods written off as food deserts. He hires from the neighborhood, adds specialty items the neighbors like and puts health clinics and community meeting rooms inside his stores. His stores make money.

Food Oasis innovators focus on what they can do, not what they can't.

In Chicago, community activists came up with Fresh Moves, a grocery on wheels.

In California, Oakland's People's Grocery created a mobile market and a farm-to-table distribution business serving low-income families. It's now launching a grocery store.

In Maryland, Baltimore's virtual supermarket allows residents to order healthy food and pick up their deliveries at neighborhood libraries, schools and senior housing sites.

August 14, 2017 at 1:17 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to review incentives request for downtown grocery store

1) Low Income Project Team (1996) ‘areas of relative exclusion where people experience physical and economic barriers to accessing healthy food’.

2) The Independent (11 June 1997) ‘food deserts were those areas of inner cities where cheap nutritious food is virtually unobtainable. Car-less residents, unable to reach out-of-town supermarkets, depend on the corner shop where prices are high, products are processed and fresh fruit and vegetables are poor or non-existent’.

3) The Observer (13 September 1998) ‘many poor housing estates were left as food deserts by the closure of local food shops’ and that in the few local food shops left, prices were up to 60% more than in the supermarkets.

4) The Guardian II (17 March 1999) ‘on the poorer estates of Coventry, low cost, good quality, food is not available to the poorest. These people ‘either have to shop at expensive local stores or pay for transport and lug small children for miles and back with shopping’.

August 14, 2017 at 1:08 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Local governments complete 2018 budgets within new tax lid law limits, but officials concerned measure may encourage bad habits

The new state law encourages DEBT instead of pay as you go. This is a form of Supply Side economics = borrow borrow borrow spend spend spend perhaps in hopes some local governments will take on more debt than they can manage thus setting up an opportunity to PRIVATIZE city services.

Kansas State Government is of course fiscally irresponsible and fiscally reckless due to the fact it is being led by the same politics that has the Kansas economy
in turmoil.

TAXPAYERS need to force the take back of their economy because the team of ALEC conservatives and ALEC Fundamentalists have demonstrated time and again they are incompetent. Embezzling tax dollars no matter how many avenues are chosen is a criminal offense.

Voters should realize by now that too many republicans are not republicans and that these people who are misrepresenting the moderate fiscal responsible republican were chosen by : http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2...

Beware:

http://www.rightwingwatch.org/report/...

http://www.pfaw.org/rww-in-focus/alec...

August 13, 2017 at 7:37 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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