Comment history

Letter: Sand pit plan

These are not just opinions of mine. Several professional geologists, including Dr. Wakefield Dort, a professor emeritus at KU who has studied the Kaw River over his fifty-plus year career, and is the undisputed world expert on the Kaw River and its channel changes, has examined the issue and opposes the pit.

October 19, 2012 at 12:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

History draws ‘rut nuts’ to town

I hope I wasn't too pessimistic. With the Freedom's Frontier National Heritage Area and the revitalized Watkins Museum, there is much more support for history in the area.

August 10, 2012 at 12:23 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

History draws ‘rut nuts’ to town

I definitely think that more recognition of all the rich local history we are fortunate enough to have here in Douglas County the better. Having the proposed Rec Center as one place for that recognition would probably be a good idea, but I am concerned that the powers that be would not push very hard for doing so. I was on the School Board when Free State opened, and I tried hard to get it to be a place where local history could be recognized and commemorated. Wayne Wildcat was preparing a three part painting about the Free State history of the area that would have been in the commons area of the high school. As he had with the painting at Central, he was involving students in the research, planning, and execution of the work. Outside sources were going to supply all the funding. All he needed was the school district to agree to accept the work and it would have been done, but internal politics in the district thwarted us at every turn, and after several years of trying, he finally became frustrated by the opposition and dropped the project, much to the detriment of the students at Free State and the recognition of our history in Lawrence. If the Rec Center is built, for it to be a place for recognition of our history, then there will need to be a concerted effort to make sure that internal city politics do not let what happened at Free State repeat itself again.

August 10, 2012 at 12:21 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

History draws ‘rut nuts’ to town

The Ivan Boyd Prairie Preserve and the Black Jack Battlefield and Nature Park both contain ruts from the Santa Fe Trail. They are three miles east of Baldwin City off US Highway 56. The ruts on the Prairie Preserve are accessible through the two-acre "Black Jack Park" along the highway. The Battlefield and Nature Park is a quarter mile south on E 2000 Road. The Prairie Preserve is owned by Douglas County. The Battlefield and Nature Park is owned by the Black Jack Battlefield Trust, and is open to the public for self-guided tours from dawn to dusk year-round.

August 10, 2012 at 11:39 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Events to recall Battle of Black Jack

Good article, except for one correction: The Black Jack Battlefield and Nature Park is open dawn to dusk year-round, not dusk to dawn.

June 1, 2012 at 12:52 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Rally to save SRS office set for Saturday at South Park

The action the Brownback Administration has taken against the SRS Office in Lawrence has nothing to do with the economy or lack of revenue by the state. They are using the current economic problems as an excuse to push through their ideological agenda. Wait for an economic downturn, and then take advantage of it. This is not the first time in history that extreme ideologues have done this. Check out the history of Germany in the 1920s and early 1930s for a frightening example of where this kind of thing can lead.

July 13, 2011 at 4:58 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

History buff wants to recreate cannon called 'Old Sacramento' used in sacking of Lawrence

I did not know that. Thank you very much! The power of the Internet, networking.

January 27, 2011 at 3:28 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

History buff wants to recreate cannon called 'Old Sacramento' used in sacking of Lawrence

It was captured from Mexican forces by United States forces led by Colonel Alexander Doniphan in the Battle of Sacramento near Chihuahua, Mexico, on February 28, 1847, during the Mexican-American War.

January 27, 2011 at 11:21 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

History buff wants to recreate cannon called 'Old Sacramento' used in sacking of Lawrence

And if you want to help us in our efforts, contact us at

January 27, 2011 at 10:50 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

History buff wants to recreate cannon called 'Old Sacramento' used in sacking of Lawrence

Several things are missing from the story in the JW. After the sack of Lawrence, the headquarters of the Free-State movement in the Territory, on May 21, 1856, the proslavery men took "Old Sacramanto" to Franklin, Kansas, near where the Douglas County Jail is now, and put it in a fortified log structure called Fort Franklin. Free-State men attacked the fort on June 4, 1856, and captured the cannon. The Free-State men then used it against proslavery forces in the Battle of Fort Titus south of Lecompton on August 16, 1856, and the Battle of Hickory Point in Jefferson County on September 14, 1856. After it was used to celebrate the admission of Kansas to the Union as a Free State, it remained in Lawrence. In July of 1896, the cannon was overloaded with three pounds of gunpowder, and had gunny sacks, mud, and grass pounded in the muzzle with a sledge hammer. When the cannon was fired, it blew up. My hope is that a New "Old Sacramento" will help to remind the people of Lawrence about its rich and unique history.

January 27, 2011 at 10:35 a.m. ( | suggest removal )