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State archeologist finds no Civil War graves at Ninth and New Hampshire development site; plans no more testing

Where were your ancestors and what were they doing on August 21, 1863?

November 6, 2012 at 9:28 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

State archeologist finds no Civil War graves at Ninth and New Hampshire development site; plans no more testing

Thinking of 9th & New Hampshire, or really the whole downtown area, as Lawrence's Ground Zero puts things in a different light.

November 6, 2012 at 9:25 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

State archeologist finds no Civil War graves at Ninth and New Hampshire development site; plans no more testing

The contrast behind the expenses people begrudge to investigate the details of Quantrill's Raid vs. those of 9/11 is stark. The contrast between local commemoration of that event and the nation's commemoration of 9/11 even more so.
http://m.washingtontimes.com/news/201...

November 6, 2012 at 9:22 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

State archeologist finds no Civil War graves at Ninth and New Hampshire development site; plans no more testing

An 1897 account of "the Quantrell Massacre" that mentions the names of the young Union recruits, ages 18 to 21, for whose bodies the State Archaeologist was searching yesterday:
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/hns...

The author's comments on why the citizens of Lawrence suffered so in this violent terrorist attack of 150 years ago are worth considering. The contrast between concern for investigation and commemoration of the events and victims of September 11, 2001 and those of August 21, 1863 is sobering.

November 6, 2012 at 9:06 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

State archeologist finds no Civil War graves at Ninth and New Hampshire development site; plans no more testing

I'm grateful to Bob Hoard for doing his job well, to Bob Schumm and the City Commission for taking this research seriously, and to the developers for paying the burdensome expense of seven hours of equipment and operator to undertake such a careful excavation to investigate a century-old mystery in the history of Quantrill's Raid. One only needs to visit the grave of George Burt, a victim of the raid buried in the tiny Davis Cemetery (behind the Pennzoil on 6th St.), to realize how dramatically our landscape has changed in 150 years and how fragile and ephemeral the traces of our nation's violent history actually are. I hope this is just the first of many events to remind the citizens of Lawrence of the lives lost and lessons learned on that fateful day in August 1863. I hope its150th anniversary next year will be commemorated with appropriate solemnity and respect for those who paid for their beliefs with their lives so that others could enjoy freedom.

November 6, 2012 at 8:57 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Test excavation of possible grave site at Ninth and New Hampshire likely to happen in next few days

“The following were ‘Unmustered Recruits’ who were killed in their tents unarmed:

Anderson, C.
Allen, Chas, R.
Cooper, Jas. F.
Green, John R.
Griswold, Walter B. S.
Walderman, Aaron
Markel, David
Markel, Lewis
Markel, Samuel
Parker, Ashbury
Parker, Isaac
Riggs, Chas. F.
Speer, Robt.
Watson, John
Waugh, Wm. A.
Wilson, Jas.
Woods, Andrew

“Of a company of twenty-three recruits, of the ages of from eighteen to twenty years, only five escaped with their lives.”
http://archive.org/stream/gungospelea...

November 2, 2012 at 10:01 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Test excavation of possible grave site at Ninth and New Hampshire likely to happen in next few days

The reference is:

Fisher, H.D. (1897) The Gun and the Gospel: Early Kansas and Chaplain Fisher. New York: Medical Century Company.

A full digitized edition is available online.

It contains detailed, eyewitness accounts of the events of Quantrill's Raid and a full list of the victims. With the 150th anniversary of this event coming up next August, it's a story all Lawrencians should know.

Note that the author makes an impassioned plea for a monument commemorating the people who died that day and the abolitionist cause they represented. Where is that monument?

November 2, 2012 at 12:41 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Test excavation of possible grave site at Ninth and New Hampshire likely to happen in next few days

There is no indication that the dead recruits were black. In fact, it seems probable that they were white. They were reportedly between the ages of eighteen and twenty and were killed, unarmed, in their tents. Their names can be found on p. 194 of this 1897 book, published just six years before the 1903 Master's thesis:
http://archive.org/details/gungospele...

November 2, 2012 at 12:29 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

City likely to require test to answer burial puzzle at Ninth and New Hampshire

From the website of the Kansas Historical Society:

"KSA 75-2741 through 75-2754 protects unmarked burials in Kansas and the human remains and associated objects that come from them. Unmarked burials are those that do not have headstones, are not in demarcated cemeteries, and are not noted in maps, deeds, or other records. The law makes it illegal to disturb unmarked burials and prohibits the possession or display of human remains and associated objects from unmarked burials."
http://www.kshs.org/p/unmarked-burial...

October 26, 2012 at 6:17 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City likely to require test to answer burial puzzle at Ninth and New Hampshire

The point about someone having remembered them and visited the gravesite is problematic. According to Lizzie Goodnight's thesis, "At the time of Quantrill's Raid they had begun to dig the foundation for a church at the corner of New Hampshire and Warren Streets. There was a company of 25 recruits encamped on this site, 20 of them were killed, and thrown in the trenches. The site was abandoned, and a little stone church was built on the corner of New York and Warren" (p. 17). If the recruits (U.S. Army) were not from Lawrence, but somewhere else, their families may well not have known where they were buried and therefore they were not remembered. Other burials of U.S. Army dead are considered hallowed ground. The rude and jeering comments in this discussion are inappropriate given the possible nature of these remains.

October 26, 2012 at 6:08 p.m. ( | suggest removal )