doesnotplaywellwithothers (Don Zimmer)

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New comprehensive plan could change the look of Lawrence

must have posted to wrong article


Don Zimmer 2 minutes ago
Following these three examples to take into consideration that I have observed. Steamboat Springs Colorado adopted a no growth policy that required new developments to set aside affordable units. The housing recession hit and both affordable and market rate housing collapsed leaving the construction industry in shambles. Even the no growthers, I don’t know what they’re called now, agreed with the developers to have the policy rescinded because of the loss of jobs in the construction industry. Santa Fe New Mexico adopted no growth policy. Every 3 units had to provide affordable housing. Again the housing recession hit and the construction industry collapsed. Like above construction workers moved on and no skilled labor took their place. Santa Fe has still not recovered. The city rescinded this requirement without opposition from the no growthers. Construction costs are higher because of the lack of skilled workers that have left the industry. City in western Kansas thought it was growing too fast and introduced a building moratorium and required every new subdivision to donate 10% of the project for parks. Because of budget constraints, highest mill levy in the state, the parks were never developed.

August 28, 2017 at 2:52 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

This file photo from July 2015 shows a westward look across Lawrence, including the University of Ka

Following these three examples to take into consideration that I have observed.
Steamboat Springs Colorado adopted a no growth policy that required new developments to set aside affordable units. The housing recession hit and both affordable and market rate housing collapsed leaving the construction industry in shambles. Even the no growthers, I don’t know what they’re called now, agreed with the developers to have the policy rescinded because of the loss of jobs in the construction industry.
Santa Fe New Mexico adopted no growth policy. Every 3 units had to provide affordable housing. Again the housing recession hit and the construction industry collapsed. Like above construction workers moved on and no skilled labor took their place. Santa Fe has still not recovered. The city rescinded this requirement without opposition from the no growthers. Construction costs are higher because of the lack of skilled workers that have left the industry.
City in western Kansas thought it was growing too fast and introduced a building moratorium and required every new subdivision to donate 10% of the project for parks. Because of budget constraints, highest mill levy in the state, the parks were never developed.

August 28, 2017 at 2:47 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Former Kansas missile silo converted into luxury condo

what science fiction short story involve the same plot where the caretaker shoots the owner and keep the refuge for himself? One small detail the investor forgot and did not factor in.

May 8, 2017 at 3:03 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Has the city just killed the proposal for a downtown grocery store? And other questions about City Hall's new policy on incentives

and planners should determine winners and losers (limit the number of car dealers, dentists, retailers, etc.)

BTW due to their low margins and huge capital requirements grocery chains employ the most significant demographic models of any business class. You should see the market research they do.

December 28, 2016 at 2:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Has the city just killed the proposal for a downtown grocery store? And other questions about City Hall's new policy on incentives

and excess fees and regulation of "affordable housing did not help

December 28, 2016 at 2:21 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Has the city just killed the proposal for a downtown grocery store? And other questions about City Hall's new policy on incentives

Duplicate post from another topic, but I feel relevent

Is this another case of "unintended consequences" and undue government regulations? I am familiar with two different cities that tried to regulate "affordable housing" and it completely backfired and after several years, when even the supporters realized this was creating the opposite of what they were hoping for, was reversed
One the "affordable housing ($95,000 or $850 for a one bedroom here in Lawrence?) was not affordable and the remaaing owners or renters had to pick up the affordable subsidies. This stopped all new projects and resulted in the construction industry to collapse. Neither city has recovered yet and the high skilled workers no longer are available when the market returns.
Two, both cities have extreme building regulations and fees that make even "affordable housing" costs high

December 28, 2016 at 9:34 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

City defines affordable housing as part of new incentives policy

Is this another case of "unintended consequences" and undue government regulations? I am familiar with two different cities that tried to regulate "affordable housing" and it completely backfired and after several years, when even the supporters realized this was creating the opposite of what they were hoping for, was reversed

One the "affordable housing ($95,000 or $850 for a one bedroom here in Lawrence?) was not affordable and the remaaing owners or renters had to pick up the affordable subsidies. This stopped all new projects and resulted in the construction industry to collapse. Neither city has recovered yet and the high skilled workers no longer are available when the market returns.

Two, both cities have extreme building regulations and fees that make even "affordable housing" costs high

December 27, 2016 at 12:14 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Many Kansas lawmakers able to benefit from business tax cuts

As a commercial property owner whose state LLC income is exempt from Kansas income taxes I found that I paid more in property taxes than the reduced exemption under the Brownback fiasco.. One property more than doubled from $11K to over $22K in one year with the excuse of reduced state reimbursements.
And do you think when they restore some sanity that the local governments will reduce their taxes to reflect their new income?

October 11, 2016 at 12:31 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence planning hundreds of large projects in next five years; rate increase proposed for city utility bills

so like Bernie "Free health care and free college". Nothing is free. By the way I like Bernie over the other two candidates.

so new police station, jail, and schools, etc. will not raise taxes

June 1, 2016 at 2:07 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence planning hundreds of large projects in next five years; rate increase proposed for city utility bills

I would like all local governments (City, County, and Schools) to also share their 5 year budgets and priorities. I'm afraid it would shock the heck out of us to see what we are looking at in tax increases. All things begin at the local level..
It would be nice if the State and Fed would do the same but that is unrealistic.. .

June 1, 2016 at 1:19 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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