dklamet (David Klamet)

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Letter to the editor: College worth

It is becoming increasingly obvious that our educational system is a poor value for the dollars we spend. When students graduate from high school, they are voting on the value of a college education.

In every announcement from KU, I look through to see if there is any mention of how it will control the unsustainable increases in tuition. Perhaps I've missed them, but I have never seen anything.

Instead, KU (and surely most other universities), announce new buildings and facilities and the exorbitant salaries of its administration.

There are many ways to receive an education. Unfortunately, the university system is becoming an expensive and antiquated path that becomes less attractive each year.

Like any bubble, when it starts to pop it will be rapid and painful. University administrators must believe that such a thing can never happen... just like the most of us during internet bubble of the 90's, and the housing bubble in 2008.

The requirement for a college degree is primarily a means for an employer to have some certainty that an applicant is qualified. What happens when there are other, better, ways to do that?

The tradition of "going away to college" is one for which I have fond memories. Our university system, and the universities themselves, are not bad.... they are just very broken. It will be a shame if it cannot adapt to the times and disappears.

July 20, 2017 at 5:09 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Internet and cable outages reported as WOW services convert to new company

Sunflower was ahead of the curve. Lawrence had high speed (for the day) internet before most other cities. We could use the same leadership that the Simons family showed when they expanded into cable and then internet services.

June 28, 2017 at 4:52 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Name changes, flooding, trees have shaped Linwood over past 150 years

I grew up going to school in Linwood. I wish my kids could have had that experience. I played basketball in a lot of schools built by the WPA. Many of the locations in the movie "Hoosiers" reminded me of the high school I visited.

The trophy for Track and Field League championship in 1971 is probably hidden away in storage somewhere now. The HS was absorbed into the Basehor-Linwood shool district a few years after I graduated.

It was a 1A school; I see there are still a few left.

Bigger is not always better. No shortage of memories, many of them happy ones.

June 23, 2017 at 2:24 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

As City Commission candidates get ready to talk about adding jobs, here's a look at how Lawrence is actually doing

Indeed, there are many situations where the H1B program is abused. I've seen numerous news items where companies, and even government funded organizations (UCSF for example), laid off people and replaced them with cheaper H1B people (see below), but there is a shortage of people who are willing to invest the effort to acquire the knowledge and skills to learn sometimes difficult and complex technology.

I am one of those people in a field where that happens. I keep my skills as sharp as I can.

https://ww2.kqed.org/news/2016/12/14/...

June 6, 2017 at 10:10 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

As City Commission candidates get ready to talk about adding jobs, here's a look at how Lawrence is actually doing

Lawrence seems to have little interest in promotiing businesses that employ highly skilled workers.

Case in point:
A former employer, RELM wireless, designs APCO 25 radios at a lab here in town. These are compatible with the city/county communications system. Did Lawrence buy any of these radios and support a valuable local employer? Compatibility between manufacturer's equipment is the primary reason for APCO 25. So there is no technical reason, and Motorola's radios are significantly more expensive. So what is the reason?

Whatever the reason is, clearly attracting and retaining tech companies is not one of local government's priorities.

Technology will have an ever-growing role in our lives and in the employment market. The H1B program seeks to bring in foreign workers because they can't fill positions here. Although that is only partly true, there is, indeed, a shortage because we do not emphasize these careers and these skills. Nor do we seek to attract companies that will bring these workers to our area.

Technology is only one of many important careers and businesses, but as someone who has worked in the field for my entire life, likes this area and has struggled to find employment here--Lawrence is a technological wasteland.

June 6, 2017 at 7:18 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence school board discusses outgoing superintendent's proposed salary of $150,000, but delays vote until next meeting

I neglected to mention that the comments by board members are a step in the right direction. I hope transparency will be the norm and not require an outcry from the public.

May 18, 2017 at 8:06 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence school board discusses outgoing superintendent's proposed salary of $150,000, but delays vote until next meeting

I don't know if reorgs are common at this level in a school district. They are common in the private sector.

We should respect Mr. Hayden's privacy, however some explanation as to why he is willing to leave a position and accept a twenty-five percent pay cut is appropriate. "Pressing personal reasons" would, if it were the case, be an adequate explanation.

The citizens of Lawrence are clearly willing to spend money. I would hope they insist it is spent wisely.

It is also a shame that so much attention is given to administrators, buildings, and the like. Teachers are the core of our educational system. Giving a few recognition and money is nice, but there are so many that struggle with many obstacles. Ask a few. Ask several.

We should not hide our heads and pretend our educational system is working. It is not. This should be one of our highest priorities.

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/1...

May 18, 2017 at 6:55 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

School district won't say what it plans to pay Hayden in new COO position; new questions about timing of superintendent's resignation

These are good and reasonable questions Chad. I'm glad to see that the LJW is asking them. Personnel matters do, often, require some degree of secrecy. In this situation, though, for the reasons you describe, this secrecy is troubling.

We have to have faith in those chosen to lead. At a national, state, and now local level, that faith is being tested. This is not Watergate, but it is a bad precedent.

May 16, 2017 at 11:46 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Hayden to resign as Lawrence superintendent, will stay with district in new role, pending board approval

We should not need to guess. There should not be a curtain that hides mysterious actions. Even if we do live on Oz.

May 14, 2017 at 6:05 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Hayden to resign as Lawrence superintendent, will stay with district in new role, pending board approval

It is difficult to argue with the facts. However, it is not about liberalism or conservatism--it is about accountability.
I'm willing to support more school funding if I know that the district is spending wisely and effectively. Actions like this should provoke outrage, or at least concern.
The public is either apathetic or foolish.
It is not unreasonable to expect prudent spending and transparent budgets. I see little chance that will occur. Not enough of us insist on it.

May 12, 2017 at 8:48 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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