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Secretary of State-elect Kris Kobach to jump on election fraud 'mandate'

The man wants to stop people voting who cannot show proper ID. I don't understand the problem. I have no problem showing my ID before walking into a voters booth. If I am a citizen, and lost my ID, I know that have several months to get one before entering the doors at my voting station. If you don't like Kobach', that's fine. But what he is doing in not injustice.

November 5, 2010 at 7:53 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

No official word yet on Aldrich, Henry

With an NBA Lockout on the horizon, X and Cole are gone.
Thanks for a great year and good memories. Best of luck to you in the NBA. It will take time, but eventually you will both play and make us all proud.

March 23, 2010 at 3:46 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

KU football uniforms to change in 2010

Love it coach. Good Job. "Who do you play for?" KANSAS.

February 18, 2010 at 3:39 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

For St. John students, it’s no mystery how Ash Wednesday ashes prepared

Funny. I have never once condemned an atheist, muslim, buddhist, etc. Freedom of religion in America is an amazing thing.

February 17, 2010 at 2:13 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas Senate panel endorses measure to repeal state death penalty

Expensive to administer? Please show us the facts. I would love to know how much it costs to administer! Expensive is housing one prioner for an entire year, let alone a life sentence! Expensive is the cost to tax payers who fit the bill for a legal system that allows these individuals to continue to live for nearly 10 years after being sentenced to death. Expensive is the toll it takes on the people who lost a loved one due to a brutal criminal attack. Funny how people are against the Death Penalty until something happens to a member of their family. It's a sad fact that there are people in this country who hide behind the law in order to prevent justice.

It costs $55.09 on average per day or $20,108 per year to keep an inmate in prison (FY0708)
Most of the daily cost to incarcerate an inmate in a major prison is spent on security and medical services. The remaining 20% or so is spent on feeding, clothing and educating inmates, and some administrative issues.

A total of 8.5% of the state general revenue budget goes to corrections in Florida, which has a budget of more than two billion dollars. $1.47 billion of that goes directly toward security and institutional operations, and another $424 million toward health services for inmates, including mental health and dental care.

The cost of each prison varies, depending on the types of inmates who are housed there. For example, it costs $99.12 a day to house an inmate at a reception center, because the inmates residing there are being evaluated and tested medically, psychologically, academically, vocationally, etc. In contrast, a typical adult male facility costs just $44.96 per day to house an inmate (excluding private prisons). When you average all types of state prison facilities together like those listed in the chart below, the daily cost to house an inmate is $55.09.

January 29, 2010 at 12:40 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas Legislature poised to take up death penalty repeal

Expensive to administer? Please show us the facts. I would love to know how much it costs to administer! Expensive is housing one prioner for an entire year, let alone a life sentence! Expensive is the cost to tax payers who fit the bill for a legal system that allows these individuals to continue to live for nearly 10 years after being sentenced to death. Expensive is the toll it takes on the people who lost a loved one due to a brutal criminal attack. Funny how people are against the Death Penalty until something happens to a member of their family. It's a sad fact that there are people in this country who hide behind the law in order to prevent justice.

It costs $55.09 on average per day or $20,108 per year to keep an inmate in prison (FY0708)
Most of the daily cost to incarcerate an inmate in a major prison is spent on security and medical services. The remaining 20% or so is spent on feeding, clothing and educating inmates, and some administrative issues.

A total of 8.5% of the state general revenue budget goes to corrections in Florida, which has a budget of more than two billion dollars. $1.47 billion of that goes directly toward security and institutional operations, and another $424 million toward health services for inmates, including mental health and dental care.

The cost of each prison varies, depending on the types of inmates who are housed there. For example, it costs $99.12 a day to house an inmate at a reception center, because the inmates residing there are being evaluated and tested medically, psychologically, academically, vocationally, etc. In contrast, a typical adult male facility costs just $44.96 per day to house an inmate (excluding private prisons). When you average all types of state prison facilities together like those listed in the chart below, the daily cost to house an inmate is $55.09.

January 29, 2010 at 9:13 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Is Sherron Collins the best player in college basketball today?

Great player, but I'd like to see his turnovers and sometimes poor shot selection become assists. Than he'd be right at the top with the others people have mentioned.

January 22, 2010 at 11:25 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Many older adults don't get enough protein; Lawrence nutritionist gives facts on how much is enough

Based on the comment I posted above, it seems that it all depends on one's metabolism. We are all unique and some of us or more efficient that others. We must take into consideration exercise intensity and duration, genetics, and vices such as smoking and drinking. One has to really know their body and experiment with detailed record keeping in order to find the perfect amout of protein for one sitting. Consider five meals a day at 30 grams of protein. That's alot of protein for a 170lbs. man who sits around all day. But for the 170lbs. man who is an endurance athlete, he may need more, he may need less. He has to train patiently and diligently to see you his body responds to the sequencing of protein in his meals.

January 6, 2010 at 12:01 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Many older adults don't get enough protein; Lawrence nutritionist gives facts on how much is enough

Read this online (journal):

I wish I had a dime for every time I’ve heard that fitness Urban Legend! Let’s explode this old myth right away. The idea that “the human body can only digest – at most – 30 grams at a time” is ludicrous: it makes no allowances for size differences. So a 300 pound professional football player and a 100 pound female figure skater would have the identical protein assimilation capacities? Bull S—! The big man’s internal digestive plumbing will be 2-3 times larger in diameter than an athletic woman 1/3rdhis size. This 30 grams per feeding myth ignores bodyweight: it also ignores differences in the metabolism. An athletic individual with a raging Basal Metabolic Rate (an elite Parrillo bodybuilder) will have a much higher food assimilation capacity than another individual (the same height and weight) with a sluggish metabolism. Parrillo-style bodybuilders have trained the body to be able to process massive amounts of food, quickly, efficiently and effectively. A person on a multiple-meal eating plan consumes upwards of 50 meals in a single seven day stretch: that’s a lot of digestive practice! A pro bodybuilder living on 5,000 calories per day, eating clean food, taking potent Parrillo supplements, will have a hell-of-a-lot more assimilation ability than a sedentary individual. Obese people have snail-like metabolisms and often live on less than 1,000 calories per day; starvation dieting destroys muscle. These obvious differences between the elite and the obese are ignored by the ‘one-size-fits-all’ crowd of experts. These guys pontificate with the greatest of ease, saying with great authority that “no one” can assimilate more than 30 grams of protein at any one time.” Politely I say – Poppycock!

January 6, 2010 at 11:50 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Pinckney teacher honored for her work with special education students

Congratulations. Special Needs Teachers are a true gift.

December 18, 2009 at 1:47 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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