clawhorn (Chad Lawhorn)

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A Thousand Voices: New poll shows uncertainty about East Ninth Project, Free State Festival

Hi: How are we trying to manipulate public opinion? We don't know the results of the poll before we ask the questions. We ask the questions and report on the results regardless of what they say.

October 18, 2015 at 7:35 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

A Thousand Voices: New poll shows uncertainty about East Ninth Project, Free State Festival

Mary, you are correct. We should have said plurality. We've changed it online.
Thanks,
Chad Lawhorn
Managing Editor

October 18, 2015 at 7:34 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City breaks record for most construction projects in a year; senior living community breaks ground on $12 million campus

Hi David: You did, apparently, miss an article we had on the subject of the $30 million difference regarding the HERE building permit. I wrote about it on May 28, and raised some questions about it. We'll see how those questions play out as the property is placed on the tax rolls. Here's a link to the article: http://www2.ljworld.com/weblogs/town_...

October 7, 2015 at 8:49 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

See who the leaders are in the Journal-World poll of the six finalists for the vacant Lawrence City Commission seat

Thanks for the comments Theodore. I think we just disagree about the breadth of readership that LJWorld.com, KUsports.com and Lawrence.com have. I think we do agree on what it takes to have meaningful results "a sample that touches on many cross sections within that segment." I think the fact that we're a general interest news site, as opposed to a niche site, helps us reach many cross sections. The good news is that more validation work is being done all the time on the effectiveness of this type of polling. As I noted before, Google Consumer Surveys is the platform we use. It conducted polling in the 2012 presidential election. It got its representative sample from users who use general interest news sites. An analysis by The New York Times found Google's polls to be the second most accurate of any polls conducted during the final days of the election. Google was off by an average of 1 percentage point. Gallup, which uses a more traditional method like you have described, was off about 7 points. One analysis, of course, doesn't settle the issue. But it is encouraging. Thanks.

September 30, 2015 at 1:58 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

See who the leaders are in the Journal-World poll of the six finalists for the vacant Lawrence City Commission seat

Hi Bonnie. Thanks for your comments. I would note that not every registered voter has a telephone either, yet that has been the predominant method for polling for decades. I'm struggling to see the difference.

September 30, 2015 at 12:11 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

See who the leaders are in the Journal-World poll of the six finalists for the vacant Lawrence City Commission seat

Thanks for the comments David. I'll add a few of my own because I don't want people to be misinformed about our intentions. 1. We aren't seeking to influence commissioners or anyone else. You are acting like the idea of a poll is a new concept in America. It obviously isn't. 2. You would rather we go ask a dozen or 20 people on the street for their opinion rather than ask 1,000 registered voters — spread across a broad range of demographics — their opinions? That makes no sense to me. The larger the sample size, the more accurate the result. 3. I've commented on this topic more than I do on most topics. I'm not trying to be argumentative, but rather want to be clear in why we're doing this. We do plan to do more polls on more topics in the future. The reason we're interested in doing so is because we believe we have access to technology that can provide meaningful results. Not perfect results, but meaningful. I've heard from both residents and elected officials that they don't feel like the "voice of the people" is being heard very well. These polls won't be the definitive voice of the people. But they can be one more tool to help gauge attitudes and opinions in Lawrence. Thanks, Chad Lawhorn, managing editor.

September 30, 2015 at 8:16 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

See who the leaders are in the Journal-World poll of the six finalists for the vacant Lawrence City Commission seat

Hi Bonnie. Thanks for your comments. I'm confused by some of them though. I'm not sure what you mean by it would be easy for people to stuff the ballot box on this poll. To be clear, the users of our websites had no ability to determine whether they could participate in this poll. The participants were chosen at random, which is one of the key components of a scientific poll. I also believe that our sample is much more representative than you give it credit for. We have approximately 80,000 unique users on our website each day. That produces a very broad sample in a community our size. Website users are more varied than you may think. In rough numbers, here are the age demographics of this poll: 18-24 - 5%; 25-34 - 15%; 35-44 - 20%; 45-54 - 15%; 55-64 - 19%; 65 plus - 11%. I won't say that is a perfect breakdown by age in our community, but it is close. By gender we had 51 percent male, 38 percent female, and the balance was unidentified. As I noted in the article above, the poll was more male skewed than we would have preferred, but I think still very significant. I know there are some concerns that Internet-based polls aren't accurate because there are certain types of people who don't use the Internet. The Internet polling industry is still evolving, but the results thus far are promising. I would note that The New York Times examined which polls ended up being the most accurate in the 2012 presidential election, and Google Consumer Surveys finished second in the rankings. Internet-based polls took four of the top seven spots in the rankings. http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.... Thanks, Chad Lawhorn, Managing Editor

September 29, 2015 at 7:22 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

See who the leaders are in the Journal-World poll of the six finalists for the vacant Lawrence City Commission seat

Hi: We have approximately 80,000 unique users on our websites each day. Obviously, not all of them are from Lawrence, but many of them are. We think that produces a pretty broad representation in a community of about 100,000 people. Thanks.

September 29, 2015 at 6:53 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Fallout from Farmer allegations may create questions at City Hall; process to find City Commission replacement gets going tonight

I agree the wording wasn't the best. I basically wanted to provide some examples of what the city may examine, but I also wanted to be clear that I didn't have any evidence that such activity had taken place. I do think, however, the general premise of the article is fair. Thanks, Chad.

September 17, 2015 at 7:13 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City to consider reducing number of lanes on portion of Kasold Drive; new info on pending appointment of commissioner; report estimates Rock Chalk tourneys add $4.4 million to economy

I think the 651 figure is peak traffic in one direction on the road in one hour. The 15,000 is total traffic, all directions, during the course of the day. I think that is correct, if I'm reading the report correctly. http://www.lawrenceks.org/assets/agen...

August 16, 2015 at 10:44 a.m. ( | suggest removal )