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SamCrow (Sam Crow)

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In new ad, group backing Brownback praises governor for school bill but doesn't mention repeal of teacher tenure

You call me partisan when I note articles and reports from two public education based groups. Education Week is published by the education community for teachers, as is one of their other journals, Teacher.

"The Education Commission of the States was created by states, for states, in 1965. We track state policy trends, translate academic research, provide unbiased advice and create opportunities for state leaders to learn from one another." It is funded by the states. It doesnt make or suggest policy. It simply reports education trends in the states.

You then refer everyone to an obviously left wing web site (alecexposed) to prove your point. It is run by the Center for Media and Democracy which is directed by two people:

First is Executive Director Lisa Graves, who is self described as "a career Democratic Party and left-liberal activist who previously worked for Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)"

The second, Deputy Director Mary Bottari "served as a Press Secretary to Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.) in the late 1990s. She also worked for the Ralph Nader-founded advocacy organization Public Citizen on that group’s anti-free trade projects."

ALEC did not push the decisions to eliminate tenure by Oregon, which is one of the most liberal states in the country.

Once again, public education is not being destroyed by modifying tenure for public school teachers.

April 15, 2014 at 9:13 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

In new ad, group backing Brownback praises governor for school bill but doesn't mention repeal of teacher tenure

You lose all believability in your response when you come with an outlandish statement such as "destroying public education".

Oregon and Florida are but two of many states making changes. If I had noted others, you would have objected with those.

April 14, 2014 at 9:02 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

In new ad, group backing Brownback praises governor for school bill but doesn't mention repeal of teacher tenure

I can assure everyone that kids will continue to be educated in Kansas.

In fact, Kansas is late to the party on the issue of tenure for teachers.

A recent PBS story noted the “war being waged across the country” on tenure.

Education Week noted in an article in 2011, a published report by the Education Commission of the States stating 18 states had recently modified tenure laws. To quote from the ECS study, “…an increasing number of states have begun to more significantly rewrite their laws related to teacher tenure.”

Oregon discontinued tenure many years ago, opting instead for two year contracts. Kids still learn to read and write in that liberal state. In fact, many states do not have tenure laws.

Florida eliminated contracts longer than a year.

According to ECS, while neighboring Nebraska does have a tenure provision, Oklahoma does not. Missouri has a tenure provision, Colorado does not.

The ECS database is split into two sections: 1. Teacher tenure/continuing contract provisions and 2. Reasons for termination/dismissal. It should be read by anyone interested in the subject.

Education will continue in Kansas, despite the “sky is falling” ramblings of some.

April 14, 2014 at 1:01 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Letter: Due process

I remember when the LWV was in education of issues rather than advocacy.

When Furtado took over, it changed. It should be noted the KNEA was the second largest donor to her 2008 campaign.

I wonder what the LWV tax status is?

April 9, 2014 at 4:12 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas teachers vow to fight for rights

Again, untrue.

April 9, 2014 at 12:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas teachers vow to fight for rights

Paul, what you wrote is absolute nonsense.

First of all, vesting is at 4.5 years.

From the KPERS website, under "leaving employment":

If You Are Vested

You are guaranteed a monthly retirement benefit for the rest of your life if you leave your contributions in your account. Often, if you have a significant amount of service, your benefit is more valuable than your actual contributions. If you keep your contributions with the Retirement System, you can apply for retirement benefits when you become eligible. They will continue to earn interest and you can withdraw at any time if you change your mind.

If you do not withdraw, and you return to covered employment, you will immediately become an active member again and keep your service credit.

If You Are Not Vested

You are not guaranteed a retirement benefit. You need to withdraw your account within five years. After five years, your contributions stop earning interest and you forfeit your service credit.

If you do not withdraw or retire and you return to employment within five years, you will immediately become an active member again and keep your service credit.

April 9, 2014 at 11:39 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas teachers to take lessons from Statehouse back to classrooms

You both are referring to leading a discussion. Others on this thread wrote of advocating for unpopular causes. At least you realize the difference.
Of course, it must be age appropriate.

April 8, 2014 at 8:11 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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