RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth)

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Editorial: Street strategy

From: <br>
http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/intersecti...

Roundabouts:<br>
Improve safety<br>
More than 90% reduction in fatalities*<br>
76% reduction in injuries** <br>
35% reduction in all crashes** <br>
Slower speeds are generally safer for pedestrians<br>

* "Safety Effect of Roundabout Conversions in the United States: Empirical Bayes Observational Before-After Study." Transportation Research Record 1751, Transportation Research Board (TRB), National Academy of Sciences (NAS), Washington, D.C., 2001.

** NCHRP Report 572: Roundabouts in the United States. National Cooperative Highway Research Program, TRB, NAS, Washington, D.C., 2007.

From:<br>
http://www.autoblog.com/2011/02/23/ro...

Data from the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety back up the case for a wider adoption of roundabouts. A 2001 study reported that converting intersections from traffic signals or stop signs to roundabouts reduced injury crashes by 80 percent and all crashes by 40 percent. A similar study found a 75 percent decrease in injury crashes and a 37 percent decrease in total crashes at 35 intersections that were converted from traffic signals to roundabouts.

But, our local resident expert Mr. Fred Whitehead, Jr. knows better. Or does he?

July 6, 2015 at 10:29 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Opinion: U.S. lost in fantasy world on Iran pact

I am reminded of Neville Chamberlain's famous words after the Munich pact with Adolf Hitler, on September 30, 1930. "My good friends, this is the second time there has come back from Germany to Downing Street peace with honour. I believe it is peace for our time. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Now I recommend you go home, and sleep quietly in your beds."

And a few years later, "It is perfectly evident now that force is the only argument Germany understands and that "collective security" cannot offer any prospect of preventing such events until it can show a visible force of overwhelming strength backed by the determination to use it. ... Heaven knows I don't want to get back to alliances but if Germany continues to behave as she has done lately she may drive us to it." <br>
- Neville Chamberlain in 1938, after a change in his attitude

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." <br>
- George Santayana

July 4, 2015 at 12:23 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Illegal firework violations can cost hundreds of dollars, jail time; police planning vigorous enforcement

They already are banned in large sections of California. But not because of fireworks, fire resistant shingles are required due to wildfires.

July 3, 2015 at 4:43 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Brownback ponders religious objections legislation following gay marriage ruling

You can legally change your name for any reason you want. I know that because at one time, I very seriously considered changing my legal name for reasons beyond the scope of this discussion. I had one all picked out too, actually. If you know me personally, you can ask me what my name would have been if I would have followed through with it.

Go to court, talk to the judge, get a court order, and pay about $350 (at that time). That's all it takes.

In Kansas, it's also possible to legally change your name by presenting yourself by your new name to everyone without intent to defraud anyone, but that introduces a large set of problems. It's much better to get a court order that you can present when necessary.

July 3, 2015 at 4:08 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Illegal firework violations can cost hundreds of dollars, jail time; police planning vigorous enforcement

That's all very true.

"Physical or sexual assault in adult or childhood" often results in the procurement of a firearm and training in its proper and safe use to prevent it from happening again, even when the intended act was not completed, and even though it appears that a repeat of the event isn't likely. And - logic has absolutely nothing to do with a flashback.

But, with the passage of a few years, sometimes it does get better. But you're very likely to always be on guard, and never be as trusting again.

July 2, 2015 at 1:10 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Illegal firework violations can cost hundreds of dollars, jail time; police planning vigorous enforcement

Fireworks are not restricted to only Independence Day. Some years ago I was a guest at a rather unusual wedding. I'd never been to a Wiccan wedding before, so the lashing together of the wrists and the oaths to the gods (yes, plural), was all new to me. Did they really believe that? I don't know.

After the wedding, the drunken groom lightly scraped my car and didn't even notice that he had done that to the only car in the whole parking lot, and then a reception of sorts was held at the couple's home. The groom wanted to celebrate by shooting off rather large bottle rockets, which he stuck into flower pots filled with dirt for holders. But he pushed them in way too deeply, so they didn't lift into the air, instead, they shot showers of sparks all over the wooden balcony. They call them bottle rockets for a reason, don't they? So you should use bottles, not potted plants to hold them in place when lighting them.

The groom was lucky, and didn't start a fire. And, the marriage lasted about a month.

The moral of the story is: <br>
Don't go to every single wedding you're invited to, because some of them are bad news.

July 2, 2015 at 12:20 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Opinion: Use common sense on Confederate flag

Collective amnesia is the price of forgetting unpleasant history, <br>
and collective amnesia is the formula for repeating it.

June 30, 2015 at 11:59 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

No one claims Kansas 5-year-old left at Kohl's

His relatives may not know about the situation. The article is rather vague about who all was informed.

Just leave his father out of it? <br>
That hit a nerve with me, and on Father's Day, no less!

June 21, 2015 at 12:36 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Letter: Less safe

You've never encountered a nutcase? You've been much more fortunate than me, it's the luck of the draw. For the first one, I'm sure glad that my grandfather had his rifle handy. But, I still never felt any need for a gun until the most recent time a man tried to kick open my door. I had already had three doors kicked open, so you'd think I would be used to it by now.

But, having your door kicked open is something you never get used to. The most recent time was extremely threatening, to say the least. He was stopped just in the nick of time.

That changed my attitude about gun ownership, as a very last resort. I don't think I'll ever carry concealed, because in my experience, at home is where a gun is needed.

June 20, 2015 at 2:58 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Letter: Less safe

Google this: <br>
crimes stopped by concealed carry statistics

It's obvious that you did not do that before you wrote your comment. And, it's also obvious that you do not do a whole lot of reading on national news sites that carry articles that cover such situations.

The statistics can be skewed by various methodologies, but there is certainly no basis in fact for your claim of "What are the odds of a CC person being present at some incident and having skills and ability to change the outcome? Maybe a billion to one?"

You also stated: "I will never knowing associate with a CC person." You do have the right to refuse to associate with off duty police officers and their wives if you want to. There is no law requiring you to do that.

But, you'll never know if they're carrying or not, unless a situation arises in which you sure do hope they are. Once, when I was young, a horrific crime which very likely would have resulted in my death was stopped by a gun. But the rifle was not concealed, so I guess that does not count.

My personal opinion is that at least some training should be required in order to carry concealed, but that opens a whole new can of worms. There would be no way to get "approved" training without government oversight, and that means there will be lists of names. Lenin, Joseph Stalin, Mao Tse-tung, and Adolf Hitler used lists such as that, which were very valuable in disarming the population, which was required before their tyranny and fascism could be of much use.

June 20, 2015 at 10:41 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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