Richardson_Snyder (Deborah Snyder)

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Stepfather of infant found in trash faces attempted murder, abuse charges

Yes, he had priors to this arrest, which wasn't included the person who is supposed to be the source reporter, since this crime is local.

My concern is... is this man's behavior part of a larger *national* story of the harm being caused by untreated vets?

July 28, 2016 at 10:54 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Stepfather of infant found in trash faces attempted murder, abuse charges

Actually, I am also interested in the back story of this man, particularly as it relates to his court-mandated treatment for PTSD by the V.A. ... is this part of a larger story of veterans going from honorable discharge to criminal courts for their uncontrolled and/or untreated mental/physical/drug-addicted behavior? Please don't assume this means I'm in any way sympathetic to his criminal acts ... I' worried about a larger symptom.

Wasn't the rampage in Baton Rouge caused by a military bet who *also* was denied treatment by V.A. officials? Is there a larger problem w/untreated vets causing (criminal) harm to their families and communities?

July 27, 2016 at 1:22 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Stepfather of infant found in trash faces attempted murder, abuse charges

I am so grateful to police staff for their hard work on behalf of this little baby. This incident has been weighing on my mind, and I am really glad you guys did such a great job... Thank-you.

July 26, 2016 at 4:40 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence fireworks stories from police and bystanders last Fourth of July

Thank-you, Cille, for reminding fireworks revelers about the factual historical record behind the local ban on explosives. It was amusing to me that not. one. response. following your post argued on the facts... let alone the accumulated anecdotes of the damage caused by revelers locally over the years... it's *always* and forever about them, their discomfort, their inconvenience, blah, blah-blah, and blah. It's *so* pre-dick-table.

July 4, 2016 at 1:18 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

After asking for them years ago, Lawrence neighborhood now unsure whether it still wants traffic calming circles

Staci- I'm not aware that the UPNA failed to capitalize on anything re: the traffic plan. As I said earlier, city street maintenance department officials did not actively work with the neighborhood in their *numerous* efforts year after year to get those intersections resolved.

And if you are genuinely interested in researching the data on accidents in the neighborhood, I'm sure Steve Evans would be happy to assign that project to you.

You'll most certainly need to contact the LPD librarian, the local insurance companies, the university's Watkins Health Center, the LMH records office and also the school district for help in going through archives, and, of course, the LJW archives for accident reports. This is something only the UPNA could pursue, and it would take awhile, if it's not been done at all.

I'm still confused about the heavy industrial traffic that you didn't appear to know about. For the last two years? Both Illinois and Missouri were extensively used by contractors for KU on south campus projects. I have personally seen 14-, 16- and 18-wheelers on Indiana as well on occasion, where the driver was clearly unhappy to be caught in a neighborhood he couldn't maneuver in.

I hope this information helps.

June 9, 2016 at 7:26 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

After asking for them years ago, Lawrence neighborhood now unsure whether it still wants traffic calming circles

Staci, I welcome an updated, intermodal yearlong traffic study in UPNA. I'm confused, however, regarding your other.comments. Heavyweight trucks used Illinois for virtually the last two years, along Missouri as well. How did you not see this? Also, while there have been no deaths on the record, there have been injuries between pedestrians and cars on a regular basis in UPNA since we moved in nearby only 25 years ago, as compared to your multi-generations long residency.

While we were busy helping to set up the Centennial Neighborhood Association, I was aware of the near hits of my children's friends on their daily trek to and from Cordley or Central Junior High. Unlike you, they quickly learned to walk 19th with their friends rather than risk getting run over.

I object to an unthorough examination of the issues surrounding why these flimsy *temporary* devices were installed, in the first place. Doesn't the city traffic department owe a better explanation for why they couldn't come up with a permanent solution year after year? I bristle at the portrayal of the UPNA as wishy washy when I know folks like Niva Entriken and Betty Alderson worked so hard to fix these problems, with little cooperation from the city street maintenance department. Traffic Calming, in whatever form it takes, should *never* have been ignored by city officials for so long. I am dissatisfied with the article as written, which avoided the political maneuvering and bare-bones assistance of city officials to resolve it.

June 9, 2016 at 2:52 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

After asking for them years ago, Lawrence neighborhood now unsure whether it still wants traffic calming circles

O.k., woah horsies! First, those four temporary devices have more than paid off their installation costs in making drivers aware of the pedestrians in that area. Second, the article does *not* lay out the chronology of attempts by the UPNA over, lo, these many years to get the city street maintenance department to replace those devices with better, permanent substitutions.

Third, 18th street cut-through traffic was bad enough during the day, and exacerbated by b-ball crowds using the neighborhood as a shortcut for 19th at night!! You betcha there are differences between a minor arterial intersection (19th & Barker) and 18th and Indiana/Illinois or 17th and Indiana/Illinois! There were. no. safe. streets. for families and children in that neighborhood *prior* to the changes made to "temporarily" calm speeding drivers.

Fourth, the article didn't examine the lack of complete sidewalks on either 18th or 17th, let alone Illinois Streets, which puts children On. The. Streets, walking to Cordley, or Central, or LHS. It didn't examine the number of LHS student parking *south* if 18th as well as the number of KU students parking *north* of it. And with no east side sidewalk on Illinois south of 17th, guess where pedestrians go??!

During the period UPNA sought permanent solutions for those intersections, the city was slapping down speed curbs in west Lawrence intersections like hotcakes, whilst *not* suggesting the same solution on streets identified as *Major* entryways to KU, or known pedestrian walkways to K-12 schools in the area??!

The *only* speedbump in that neighborhood is on Louisiana adjacent to a city park. Meanwhile, take a look at 18th and Ohio. Go. Look. Would you want your elementary or junior high child crossing Ohio there? What about 17th and Louisiana, hmmm? Think that's safe?

Think about this: the daily amount of passenger and commercial auto traffic on Illinois, Indiana and Louisiana most certainly match what occurs at Barker and 19th, *not including* the one-way volumes on Tennessee or Ohio.

The city and the UPNA need to work in a forthright manner, in earnest, to solve the lack of a complete pedestrian walkway (on one side OR the other) on 18th between Tennessee and Maine, and on a permanent substitution for the *temporary* calming devices in that neighborhood. And the newspaper should have investigated *why* these are the only such devices in use outside of construction zones in Lawrence today.

June 9, 2016 at 10:36 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to consider tax breaks for downtown development

Geez-oh-Peets, I need more coffee, Mr. Herynk.

June 7, 2016 at 10:50 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to consider tax breaks for downtown development

Sorry, that should have been Mr. Harynk, and Mr. Schumm.

June 7, 2016 at 10:45 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission to consider tax breaks for downtown development

Thank-you Mr. Henryk for listing reasonable objections for a high tax abatement on this proposal. I am disappointed that Mr. Schum isn't pursuing this project under a more fiscally progressive and friendlier tax rebate plan, setting a "gold standard" for local developers to follow.

June 7, 2016 at 10:42 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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