OldHomeTown (Sarah St. John)

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100 years ago: Nearly six inches of rain falls on Lawrence overnight

.... which led me to search the Kansas City Times for that day. Here's what they said:

“Yesterday’s trouble was all due to the fact that Brush Creek got all chesty and tried to impersonate the Mississippi River.... It succeeded to the extent that the right field fence paid a visit to the grandstand and half of the regalia belong to the Pax and the Terriers took various water excursions to parts unknown.

“Late last night it was reported that some happy youth had fished Bill Kenworthy’s home run bat out of the creek and a stray hen had made a nest in (catcher) Ted Easterly’s pet mask. But the Terriers were the heavy losers. Half of their uniforms were swept along by the rampant waters and nearly all of their gloves. The big bat bag which holds all the hitting sticks owned by visiting players was found floating peacefully about two blocks from the park and towed back. The Packs did not lose more than one or two uniforms. The traveling uniforms were not disturbed by the flood. Some few gloves, bats and shoes drifted downstream to catch on some forlorn fisherman’s hook, and the clubhouse had a foot of good old Missouri mud in it, but that was the extent of the damage.”

September 7, 2014 at 10:53 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

100 years ago: Nearly six inches of rain falls on Lawrence overnight

Also in the Journal-World that day -- more about that big storm, which had an even larger impact on Kansas City:

"The heaviest rain in the history of Kansas City and suburbs, 6.94 inches, turned Turkey Creek, a placid drainage stream, into a raging torrent a mile wide and sent it plunging over its banks into Rosedale, a suburb, where its boiling waters drove 200 families from their homes and filled the business section of the little town with from four to six feet of water, and crippled the service in the railroad yards on the western limits of the city. None were killed, but there were many narrow escapes and thrilling rescues in the southern section of Kansas City. Brush Creek, a small stream, overswept its banks and submerged the lower residence districts along Forty-eighth street and surrounded 200 residences. The creek also extended its bounds to the Federal league baseball park where the fences were washed away and the club house demolished and all uniforms and other equipment used by the club was lost."

September 7, 2014 at 10:52 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

100 years ago: J-W writer shocked at 'scantily dressed' women in downtown Lawrence

Also, as outraged and shocked as "this writer" appears to have been, he sure does appear to have taken a rather long and thorough look! All in the interests of an accurate story, I'm sure. :-)

June 5, 2014 at 9:38 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

100 years ago: J-W writer shocked at 'scantily dressed' women in downtown Lawrence

I should mention that the afternoon temperature in downtown Lawrence was in the low 90s that week.... but by all means, keep those necks covered up, ladies. :-)

June 5, 2014 at 9:37 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

The Tonganoxie Split: Myth lacks scientific backing but remains intriguing mystery

And let's not forget the Eudora tornado legend!

March 9, 2014 at 9:57 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

The Tonganoxie Split: Myth lacks scientific backing but remains intriguing mystery

If memory serves, it was Kansas City meteorologist Dan Henry who coined the term or at least popularized it.

March 9, 2014 at 9:49 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Improvements planned for North Lawrence grain elevator, but towers aren't coming down; new schedule for city compost and woodchip sales

Yep, I think you and the commenters are correct -- the 100 Years Ago ones must have been the old ones on the City Hall site. It says they were part of the Bowersock property, and I guess it doesn't make sense that Bowersock would build them across the river from his mill! Also, it says they were built along the Santa Fe tracks -- again, this would put them right there "under" current City Hall, wouldn't it?

From the description of their construction, I'm surprised they managed to tear them down -- those things sound like they were pretty solid! Kinda like the old story of the old river bridge that was "too decrepit" to go on using, but when they went to tear it down in the 1970s, it was very stubborn about being demolished! (That was before my time -- I got here in the mid-80s -- but I heard this from long-time residents.)

February 27, 2014 at 2:43 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Improvements planned for North Lawrence grain elevator, but towers aren't coming down; new schedule for city compost and woodchip sales

"Just how long they have been in place was a little tough to determine this morning."

Chad, perhaps I can be of some assistance here:

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2013/aug...

(With pictures, even! And believe me, they weren't common in the 1913 J-W!)

February 26, 2014 at 11:06 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

25 years ago: Developers ready to break ground on Riverfront Plaza

I am not much for recreational shopping, but I did like that mall! I got some excellent deals on kitchen items (of course I can't remember the name of the store) and toys and sometimes books. Also it probably had the best view of any mall I'd ever been in.

Speaking of the flood of '93, I remember going to the mall and standing out on the pedestrian walkway with a lot of other people, all of us stunned speechless at the sight of the raging, roaring Kaw just (seemingly?) a few feet below us!

February 19, 2014 at 1:53 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

100 years ago: Lawrence east-west streets change from names to numbers

Hi Clint! From what I can recall, the change was discussed for quite a long time before it finally happened. Those against it said that they wanted to continue to honor the memory of the men for whom the streets were originally named; those in favor felt that those names had been adequate in the early days when Lawrence was smaller, but now (1913) when Lawrence was larger, busier, and receiving many more visitors, it would make sense to number at least the east-west streets so that newcomers could more easily find their way around.

I suppose it must have helped to some degree. When you're on Eighth Street and you have to go to 14th, at least you know which direction you need to go. I do remember, however, when I first moved to Lawrence, I was a little confused at first that the streets with numbers went east-west except when you crossed the bridge into North Lawrence, and then they ran north-south.

Thanks for reading and commenting!!

December 2, 2013 at 12:33 p.m. ( | suggest removal )