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Mexico's Obama Rifles

(continuted)

"On Feb. 4, 2011, the Justice Department sent a letter to Sen. Grassley saying that the allegations of gun walking in Fast and Furious were false and that ATF always tried to interdict weapons. A month later, Grassley countered with what appeared to be slam-dunk proof that ATF had indeed walked guns. "[P]lease explain how the denials in the Justice Department's Feb. 4, 2011 letter to me can be squared with the evidence," Grassley wrote, attaching damning case reports that he contended "proved that ATF allowed guns to 'walk.'" The case and agent names were redacted, but the reports were not from Fast and Furious. They came entirely from Dodson's Fernandez case."

June 27, 2012 at 3:37 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Mexico's Obama Rifles

Not sure why you keep calling this a trash article...it seems pretty informative to me. Here's some good info on this Dodson character:

"...Dodson then proceeded to walk guns intentionally, with Casa and Alt's help. On April 13, 2010, one month after Voth wrote his schism e-mail, Dodson opened a case into a suspected gun trafficker named Isaiah Fernandez. He had gotten Casa to approve the case when Voth was on leave. Dodson had directed a cooperating straw purchaser to give three guns to Fernandez and had taped their conversations without a prosecutor's approval.

Voth first learned these details a month into the case. He demanded that Dodson meet with him and get approval from prosecutors to tape conversations. Five days later, Dodson sent an uncharacteristically diplomatic response. (He and Alt had revised repeated drafts in that time, with Alt pushing to make the reply "less abrasive." Dodson e-mailed back: "Less abrasive? I felt sick from kissing all that ass as it was.") Dodson wrote that he succeeded in posing undercover as a straw purchaser and claimed that prosecutor Hurley—who he had just belatedly contacted—had raised "new concerns." The prosecutor had told Dodson that an assistant U.S. Attorney "won't be able to approve of letting firearms 'walk' in furtherance of your investigation without first briefing the U.S. Attorney and Criminal Chief."

It was the first time Voth learned that Dodson intended to walk guns. Voth says he refused to approve the plan and instead consulted his supervisor, who asked for a proposal from Dodson in writing. Dodson then drafted one, which Voth forwarded to his supervisor, who approved it on May 28.

On June 1, Dodson used $2,500 in ATF funds to purchase six AK Draco pistols from local gun dealers, and gave these to Fernandez, who reimbursed him and gave him $700 for his efforts. Two days later, according to case records, Dodson—who would later testify that in his previous experience, "if even one [gun] got away from us, nobody went home until we found it"—left on a scheduled vacation without interdicting the guns. That day, Voth wrote to remind him that money collected as evidence needed to be vouchered within five days. Dodson e-mailed back, his sarcasm fully restored: "Do the orders define a 'day'? Is it; a calendar day? A business day or work day….? An Earth day (because a day on Venus takes 243 Earth days which would mean that I have plenty of time)?"

The guns were never recovered, the case was later closed, and Fernandez was never charged. By any definition, it was gun walking of the most egregious sort: a government agent using taxpayer money to deliver guns to bad guys and then failing to intercept them."

June 27, 2012 at 3:36 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Mexico's Obama Rifles

You really should read more than just the summary at the beginning of the article.

Also from the article: "Quite simply, there's a fundamental misconception at the heart of the Fast and Furious scandal. Nobody disputes that suspected straw purchasers under surveillance by the ATF repeatedly bought guns that eventually fell into criminal hands. Issa and others charge that the ATF intentionally allowed guns to walk as an operational tactic. But five law-enforcement agents directly involved in Fast and Furious tell Fortune that the ATF had no such tactic. They insist they never purposefully allowed guns to be illegally trafficked. Just the opposite: They say they seized weapons whenever they could but were hamstrung by prosecutors and weak laws, which stymied them at every turn."

June 27, 2012 at 1:22 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Mexico's Obama Rifles

Unfortunately, due to toothless Arizona gun laws, the guns were not illegal according to prosecuters. Here's a great quote from a Fortune investigation:

"Republicans who support the National Rifle Association and its attempts to weaken gun laws are lambasting ATF agents for not seizing enough weapons—ones that, in this case, prosecutors deemed to be legal."

Here's a link to the full article. It's a long one, but very interesting!

http://features.blogs.fortune.cnn.com...

June 27, 2012 at 10:28 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Know the Foe: Yellow Jackets wary of smarting Jayhawks

<crickets chirping>

September 11, 2010 at 2:41 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

McCain, Obama get tough, personal in final debate

Totally possible Tom. Sad, but possible.

October 15, 2008 at 10:10 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

McCain, Obama get tough, personal in final debate

Well, the Ayers and ACORN question was asked and just like the conservatives said, Obama was exposed as a liar and a fraud! LOL *wink* *wink*

October 15, 2008 at 10 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

McCain shies away from recent attacks

funmoney:LOL...that video was hilarious!

October 12, 2008 at 9:45 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Oklahoma State stuns Tigers, 28-23

Aww, what a shame. And to think, if Mizzou would've taken care of business the probably would've been #1!They're gonna loose next week too! And it's gonna be sweet....

October 12, 2008 at 8:05 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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