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City Commission, East Lawrence neighborhood go back and forth on Ninth Street proposal

Asking for two paid staff members to serve as consultants is not a negotiating tactic, it's the East Lawrence Obstruction Association's way to tell the world that they are special and that they want a slice of the pie that they didn't help bake.

Lawrence must continue to support change through new investment into the core of the community. Changing the "character" of east Lawrence might be better than the status quo, right? Just because something might slightly alter the landscape doesn't make it bad, does it?

A city must constantly reinvest in itself in order to maintain a vibrant core. Incentivizing reinvestment would be a great outcome for this project. Reducing sprawl in the city, creating vibrant walkable neighborhoods and new housing options can all be very, very good things.

This idea has tremendous, powerful potential for the community. I'm excited to see the next steps.

December 21, 2014 at 9:06 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Pair of restaurants proposed for location near Sixth Street Wal-Mart; City Hall tensions rise over East Lawrence proposal

So much wrong with East Lawrence's proposals, not sure where to start. If the Association can bring themselves to actively oppose so many projects, they can certainly find a way to volunteer for for duty on this project. Working class neighborhood or not, civic duty is civic duty. It doesn't pay.

The arrogance to ask for final design approval almost escapes description. Certainly, the neighborhood should be consulted as this project moves forward, but it is not their role to make decisions for a community that did not elect them.

Finally, the dirty little secret for most neighborhood associations is that they are usually begging people to serve, they have very few people who are actively involved and most never leave and, they simply don't represent the popular opinions of the neighborhoods they serve. While it's always important to get feedback from citizens and, where possible, involvement, you would get a much better idea of what East Lawrencians think by walking down the sidewalk on a weekend afternoon and speaking to exactly 5 people.

December 17, 2014 at 1:35 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Jenkins says conservatives won in $1.1 trillion spending bill

How on earth does someone as stupid as Lynn Jenkins end up in Congress?

Also, I didn't realize budgets were win-lose propositions. Wouldn't a leader, representing a wide variety of citizens, consider trying to develop a win-win solution?

December 12, 2014 at 6:55 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Pachamamas restaurant up for sale, may close after Valentine's Day; Rock Chalk gets set for big basketball tourney

Tons of respect for people who put so much into their passion. My best to the owner and employees of Pachamama's. Thanks for your efforts to make Lawrence a more interesting place.

December 12, 2014 at 6:52 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City manager offers apology on Rock Chalk matter; commissioners suggest audit

The number one reason people leave their jobs is because they work for bad bosses. Since public employees work for you, are you a bad boss? Are your expectations realistic? Are you compassionate? Or are you one of those people who simply throw those who work for you under the bus, each and every opportunity?

December 12, 2014 at 6:49 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Neighborhood group asking city to slow down on downtown grocery store project; update on city's quest to get Google Fiber-like Internet service

This building would replace what is, essentially, an empty building. It's been an eyesore for 20 years or more and Allen Press has done nothing about it. Where was your campaign to force them to do something with this prime piece of visible real estate?

December 10, 2014 at 10:23 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Neighborhood group asking city to slow down on downtown grocery store project; update on city's quest to get Google Fiber-like Internet service

No law should be written that permanently controls the landscape. Times change, tastes change, let the landscape reflect these changes. Reinvestment in the core of the community is what will continue to make it strong over the long term.

December 10, 2014 at 10:21 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Neighborhood group asking city to slow down on downtown grocery store project; update on city's quest to get Google Fiber-like Internet service

Richard, I'm sincerely confused. Are you suggesting that the Riverfront Plaza, Tanger Mall or a hypothetical development are all architecturally interesting?

If Riverfront Plaza had been developed into a downtown convention hotel or apartment building, it would have been a huge success.

And what, on earth, does Tanger have to do with anything? A cheesey strip mall out by the highway?

December 10, 2014 at 10:19 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Neighborhood group asking city to slow down on downtown grocery store project; update on city's quest to get Google Fiber-like Internet service

Antique architecture has exactly zero impact on visitors to this town. And who is to say that the "character" of downtown can't evolve over time? Perhaps into something even better than what we have now.

Vibrancy is what brings people to downtown. Period.

December 10, 2014 at 10:17 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Neighborhood group asking city to slow down on downtown grocery store project; update on city's quest to get Google Fiber-like Internet service

Have never understood the argument that a not-very-tall building that sits across the street from another building somehow detracts from that building. Somewhere, we've adopted this insane idea that historical buildings require large buffers (100 feet each direction apparently isn't enough) and that only buildings that purely pay homage can be allowed in the vicinity.

Although some due respect should be paid to historical buildings, history is also being made today, tomorrow and the day after that. A seven-story building fits the downtown imprint just fine. The building will have three lanes of traffic, set-back and other space between it and the historic structures. That's more than ample.

How about, instead of constantly looking backward, let's create something new and interesting downtown? How about a stunning piece of architecture?

One of my favorite old things about the KU campus was the juxtaposition of architectural styles, colors, etc. I loved the bit of mis-mash feel of things - it was interesting. That was, until someone decided that everything has to be limestone with a red roof. I've been to the Purdue campus and to the UVA campus and couldn't have yawned more. KU is quickly adopting this garanimals approach to its own campus architecture. It doesn't need to spill off the hill into downtown.

Let's show some respect to old things without sapping out the energy, creativity and vibrancy of the new. Downtown and the core of the city needs more density, more reinvestment and constant creativity to keep it growing, alive and vibrant.

December 9, 2014 at 5:41 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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