JasonSprenger

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Opinion: Leaders tout benefits of school plan

Skills gaps are emerging in today's economy, and a solution that’s proven to make a difference in helping the economy thrive is investing in career and technical education (CTE). That's why this program and investment makes sense. CTE programs, whether at the secondary, post-secondary or other educational level, boost student achievement and deliver increased career and earning potential. CTE also produces workers for the open jobs of today, and boosts business productivity and economic status as a result.

The Industry Workforce Needs Council is a new organization of businesses working together to spotlight skills gaps and advocate/kick off CTE programs that work to curb the problem. For more information, or to join the effort, visit the IWNC website.

Jason Sprenger, for the IWNC

March 28, 2013 at 10:43 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence district planning to expand career and tech ed opportunities

Kansas has done a decent job of advancing career and technical education (CTE) policy in the past, and it's essential that he continue. Skills gaps are an emerging topic among economists today, because they exist and are getting worse. It’s wise for business, government, cities, etc. to start brainstorming and implementing solutions before the problem grows to be too severe.

CTE has proven to make a difference. CTE programs, whether at the secondary, post-secondary or other educational level, boost student achievement and deliver increased career and earning potential. CTE also produces workers for the open jobs of today, and boosts business productivity and economic status as a result.

The Industry Workforce Needs Council is a new organization of businesses working together to spotlight skills gaps and advocate/kick off CTE programs that work to curb the problem. For more information, or to join the effort, visit http://www.iwnc.org.

Jason Sprenger, for the IWNC.

January 7, 2013 at 2:55 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence schools planning expanded career and technical education

Skills gaps do exist and are getting worse in the economy today, and it's prudent for communities to invest in solutions. One of them is career and technical education (CTE), which has proven to produce a return in areas like improved student achievement, career prospects, more trained workers for the jobs of today and improved community vitality. Programs like this would make a tremendous difference.

The Industry Workforce Needs Council is a new group of businesses working together to spotlight skills gaps and advocate for CTE as a means of bridging them. For stats and other information, or to join the effort, visit www.iwnc.org.

Jason Sprenger, for the IWNC

December 17, 2012 at 1:18 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

State ed board looks at defining ‘college and career readiness’

It's great to see this discussion take place, because skills gaps are indeed emerging in the economy, and they have a tremendous impact on several levels - businesses, communities, the nation and of course individuals and families. One way that we all can work to bridge these gaps is to invest in education, specifically career and technical education (CTE), and particularly in the ways outlined in this piece. CTE has evolved over the years to cover most career paths out there today, and has proven to deliver many benefits: improved student achievement, more business production, more open jobs being filled, etc. These programs work particularly well when businesses work with educators to devise and implement programs, so that the programs most closely match their skills/needs and can help them today.

The Industry Workforce Needs Council is a new group of businesses working together to advocate for CTE and curb skills gaps nationwide. For more information, or to join the effort, visit www.iwnc.org.

Jason Sprenger, for the IWNC

November 12, 2012 at 10:34 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

First Bell: A peek into next year's legislative agenda for education

Investments in career and technical education (CTE) have proven to pay off in several ways: improved student achievement and career prospects, community vitality, better production in local businesses and the reduction/reversal of emerging skills gaps in the economy. For all of these reasons and more, it's worth continuing to support programs that teach these skills - especially ones that are produced in connection/with input from area businesses.

The Industry Workforce Needs Council is a new group of businesses working together to advocate for CTE, especially as a means of curbing skills gaps across the nation. For more information, or to join the effort, visit www.iwnc.org.

Jason Sprenger, for the IWNC

November 6, 2012 at 2:19 p.m. ( | suggest removal )