Dave_Trabert (Dave Trabert)

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Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

Schools decide how much has to be allocated to bonds, which comes off the top of available aid. Supreme Court says all funding must be considered, even KPERS. The state is just the transfer agent; all money comes from taxpayers.

You're wrong about aid declining every year since 2008. According to KSDE, state aid increased every year since 2011 and total aid increased every year since 2012. http://www.ksde.org/Portals/0/School%...

March 24, 2016 at 8:58 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

Except his facts are dead wrong. He repeated false information from NY Magazine. Revenue projections were not off by a billion dollars. No one ever predicted that state revenue would increase by $300 million. It was planned for state revenues to decline.

Now if he wanted to poke fun, he could have legitimately done so by noting that the majority of democrats and republicans increased spending to record levels instead of balancing the budget by making government a tad more efficient.

March 23, 2016 at 8:01 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

Amazon decided it didn't need a Kansas location. Schools refuse to operate efficiently and use leftover aid from prior years. A scant 2.4% of teachers left Kansas last year...about the same as in many previous years...KSDE consciously released info that overstated the issue. The Supreme Court did NOT determine that spending (adequacy) is not at a constitutional level; they haven't even heard oral arguments on the appeal of the lower court ruling, which defied the Supreme Court guidance on how to measure adequacy. I don't know why the Court threatened to close schools over about 0.5% of state funding but that isn't going to happen. And the research I'm citing is all school district and government data.

March 23, 2016 at 4:56 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

Each article is sourced to government data...Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic Analysis, IRS data reviewed by Center on the American Experiment. The KPI site isn't the source as you well know...it's the repository of information sourced elsewhere.

March 23, 2016 at 4:51 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

According to KSDE (Open Records request), per pupil funding in 1992 including KPERS was $5,416; without, $5,307. Adjusted for inflation (CPI, Midwest Urban Cities on a fiscal year basis), funding with KPERS would have been $9,067 in 2015; without, $8,884. Actual funding in 2015 was $13,124; without KPERS, $12,445. Actual funding was therefore 45% and 40% above inflation-adjusted levels. Put another way, adjusted for inflation, total funding would have been $1.88 billion less in 2015.

March 23, 2016 at 4:48 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

That's not true, of course, but I would welcome an unbiased analysis of what's actually occurred. First of all, any predictions made in 2012 were predicated on implementing what was passed in 2012...but that bill was never implemented as passed. Instead of reducing the cost of government, the majority of legislators in both parties chose to increase taxes in 2013. And then they chose to increase taxes again in 2015, while approving record-setting spending.

No one will ever know what would have happened if the plan passed in 2012 had been implemented, but the net tax reduction that has been implemented has made Kansas more competitive on job creation and GDP growth as shown by honest analysis of government data.

Here's one example on jobs. Note that Kansas has added private sector jobs at a faster pace than Missouri, Nebraska and Oklahoma between Dec. 2012 and Dec. 2015...that wasn't the case over the long term prior to Dec. 2012. https://kansaspolicy.org/1308-2/

Here's another examination of income migration data from the IRS, showing that Kansas has significantly improved its national ranking on in-migration of HH incomes over $200,000. Net negative migration in 2012 improved in 2013 but was still slightly negative; 2014 turned positive and was 17th best in the nation. https://kansaspolicy.org/kansas-gains...

And here's yet another example, which (again) debunks claims by KCEG on Personal Income growth. https://kansaspolicy.org/1708-2/

March 23, 2016 at 3:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

Per pupil spending is actually 45% above inflation over the life of the old funding system; without KPERS, it's 40% above inflation.

March 23, 2016 at 3:16 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

The Koch brothers wouldn't know what we think because we don't work for them. But I'm not suggesting that you should care. Just pointing out that the story failed to report that 2 school districts support this legislation and that expert testimony was presented that contradicts concerns expressed by the 2 opponents. News is supposed to report the facts; this story left out very important facts and by doing so, regardless of intent, presents a biased slant.

March 23, 2016 at 12:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers hope to send school funding bill to Brownback by Thursday

It's noteworthy that this article lists the two districts that oppose the plan but neglects to mention that Shawnee Mission and Blue Valley testified in support.

Kansas Chamber president and lawyer Mike O'Neal also supported the plan and gave extensive testimony to explain why the bill should fully conform to the Court's ruling on equity.

March 23, 2016 at 11:51 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence school taxes could be lowered under House finance bill

By your definition, no research from KASB, KNEA, KCEG, etc. could ever be considered.

Spending per pupil increased 45% above inflation over the life of the old funding system. If per-pupil spending had increased for inflation since 1992, it would have been $9,067 last year instead of $13,124. Total spending would have been $1.88 billion less.

March 16, 2016 at 8:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )