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Dave_Trabert (Dave Trabert)

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Kansas has lower private-sector job growth than U.S. as a whole

So you cannot dispute the facts. Got it.

November 24, 2014 at 9:38 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas has lower private-sector job growth than U.S. as a whole

It's not access to unusual revenue that allows states to have lower taxes. It's how much they spend. A state could have all the oil revenue in the country and still have high taxes if it spent a lot more. Every state has public education, social services, highways, etc. but the states that tax income spent 49% more per-resident than those without an income tax.

November 24, 2014 at 7:43 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas has lower private-sector job growth than U.S. as a whole

Please let me know if there is anything inaccurate in what I posted. Your unwillingness to examine facts...especially when they are contrary to what you want to believe...does not invalidate the facts as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

November 24, 2014 at 7:38 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas has lower private-sector job growth than U.S. as a whole

As was mentioned here earlier, Kansas has trailed national averages for a long time. What's lacking in this report is any perspective.

Between 1998 and 2012, income-taxing states experienced total private sector job growth of 3.64% over that 14-year period; Kansas' growth rate was 2.31%...or 63.5% of its peers. States that don't tax income grew by 15%. (BLS, average annual employment, seasonally adjusted)

Kansas is still trailing since income taxes were reduced. Comparing October 2014 to December 2012, income-taxing states grew 3.27% while Kansas grew 3.02%. Now Kansas is at 92.4% of its' peers growth. States without an income tax grew 5.78%.

November 24, 2014 at 4:47 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas has lower private-sector job growth than U.S. as a whole

Gina is talking about total population, which has not declined...primarily because the birth rate exceeds the death rate.

Lawrence is referring to Domestic Migration, which is a subset of population change. Kansas has lost population due to domestic migration (US residents moving in and out of states) every year since 1998.

November 24, 2014 at 4:41 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

KPI is an independent think-tank that advocates for free market solutions, limited government and the protection of personal freedom. Our work centers on state and local economic policy with primary emphasis on education, tax and fiscal policy and transparency. We empower citizens, legislators, and other government officials with objective research and creative ideas to promote a low-tax, pro-growth environment that preserves the ability of governments to provide high quality services

November 20, 2014 at 12:28 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

These funds operate like a personal checkbook...the balance goes up when more money is deposited than is spent. The increases indicate that universities collected more than was needed to be spent, so we are proposing that some of that money be spent now.

I would be delighted to have a public debate with Jack Martin about cash management practices.

November 20, 2014 at 12:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

Universities would still have a reserve equal to the amount held in 2003 in that account. There is no record of universities claiming they had inadequate reserves. They did just fine with the previous amount and can do so again. Also, the reserves in this particular fund are only a small portion of total reserves.

Our plan shows how to balance the budget based on the new, lower revenue estimates. There is no need for tax increases or service reductions. The State just needs to make better use of existing resources and provide services at a better price.

November 19, 2014 at 8:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

This article doesn't mention it but the source of the recommended reserve reduction is unspent tuition. The Kansas Policy Institute proposal doesn't address any of the other cash reserves held by universities...just their unspent tuition money. http://www.kansaspolicy.org/ResearchC...

Table 8 in the KPI plan shows that universities accumulated $75.6 million in unspent tuition between 2003 and 2014. The KPI Budget Plan recommends requiring the use of half of that money through a one-time reduction in state aid; we also recommend that universities offer a one-time reduction in tuition with the balance of the increase and collectively retain an $11.8 million reserve as existed in 2003.

Each university would have the same resources available to spend next year under our plan...the reduction in aid would be covered by the use of their unnecessary tuition reserves. Full aid would be restored the following year.

November 19, 2014 at 8:06 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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