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Dave_Trabert (Dave Trabert)

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Report: Kansas economy picked up steam in late 2013

One quarter certainly does not make a trend, although it should be noted that private sector GDP growth exceeded the national average for all of 2013. Actual GDP growth is higher; the 3% growth for the 4th quarter is Real GDP...meaning that GDP grew 3% in addition to any amount attributed to inflation.

August 22, 2014 at 10:57 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Report: Kansas economy picked up steam in late 2013

Not true. Nothing specific was identified. You merely made a broad generalization. I am asking you to substantiate your allegation.

August 22, 2014 at 9:41 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Report: Kansas economy picked up steam in late 2013

I can only speak for KPI; you should address that question to the Governor.

August 22, 2014 at 9:19 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Report: Kansas economy picked up steam in late 2013

Please explain why you believe government data is not accurate.

August 22, 2014 at 7:44 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Report: Kansas economy picked up steam in late 2013

If you read the post, you see that BLS is the source of GDP data and that The Tax Foundation is the source for the ten states with the highest and lowest state and local tax burden. ALEC does not produce that information.

August 22, 2014 at 7:42 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Report: Kansas economy picked up steam in late 2013

It should be noted that the reported data is Real GDP, which means it is adjusted for inflation. This data also includes government. Private sector GDP growth is more important in gauging economic growth.

Kansas' private sector Real GDP for all of 2013 exceeded the fifty-state average, which is encouraging since Kansas trails historically. http://www.kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/1...

August 21, 2014 at 5:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas teachers union to efficiency panel: 'Stop cutting'

Devin offers much in the way of rhetoric but is light on facts, including some very pertinent ones that he ignores. Such as...Montoy no longer applies because the Supreme Court said that made their decision in Montoy based on how the facts were presented at the time. They now see things differently (perhaps because it is now understood that the cost study used in Montoy was deliberately skewed to provide inflated numbers) and neither Base State Aid nor 'actual cost' is the touchstone for determining adequacy.

The Supreme Court says all funding, including KPERS, must count. But Devin and others refuse to acknowledge the court ruling. They also neglect to mention that no funding decisions have ever been based on efficient use of taxpayer money or that every Legislative Post Audit study has found school districts to be operating inefficiently. They neglect to mention that Base State Aid is only part of the unrestricted money flowing to districts. And they neglect to mention that schools haven't even spent all of the money provided by taxpayers.

The number of teacher aides are being reduced in Shawnee Mission because the district is converting part time people to full time. Same coverage but at a better price.

Now lets look at class sizes. The pupil / classroom teacher ratio was 16.4 to 1 in 1993. It was 15.5 to 1 in 2005 and fell again to 15.4 to 1 in 2014. Teacher employment is growing faster than enrollment. If class sizes are increasing under such circumstance, it's a result of many different management decisions and some union agreements.

In the case of Shawnee Mission, your pupil / classroom teacher ratio fell from 18.4 to 1 to 17.9 to 1. But while enrollment fell 6.2% since 2005, the number of non-teaching positions increased by 10.7%. Regardless of the reasons, those are management decisions.

By the way, I have given Devin's group an open offer to come speak to them about these issues. They have thus far not been interested.

August 21, 2014 at 3:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas teachers union to efficiency panel: 'Stop cutting'

No, it does not list that as a long-term goal of KPI. As I remind you every time you attempt to imply otherwise, that paper is academic review of multiple options that are considered by a wide range of people. Our recommendations for school choice are very clear. Tax credit scholarships for low income students, a system of allowing special education funding to follow the child and public charter schools that can authorized independent of the local school district.

August 21, 2014 at 2 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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