Dave_Trabert (Dave Trabert)

Follow

Comment history

State agencies face large rent increase from their landlord — the state

This is just the tip of the iceberg we've been talking about for years. Agencies are charged above-market prices for rent, telephone costs and other items. KPI gets a better price on copies from Office Depot than agencies are charged and we have very little volume.

Outsourcing these functions is just one example of how the State can operate more efficiently to avoid tax increases or service cuts.

August 21, 2016 at 1:35 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City manager: Positions on chopping block are 'nontraditional'

FYI, City of Lawrence property taxes increased 197% between 1997 and 2015, while inflation and population combined increased 82%. http://www.kansasopengov.org/kog/data...

July 12, 2016 at 6:01 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City manager recommends staff cuts, no property tax rate increase for 2017

Yes, you are reading it accurately. Most often, a 'cut' to government is merely a smaller than desired increase. Basic operating costs are increasing far more than inflation.

Go to PDF page 27 of the linked budget document to see these General Fund changes:

Personnel services +6%
Contractual services +6%
Total General Fund spending net of transfers (sending money to other funds for spending) +8.9%

Property Taxes +3.6%
Franchise Fees +15.2%
Charges for Services 11.7%

July 9, 2016 at 10:47 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City manager recommends staff cuts, no property tax rate increase for 2017

It isn't a spending reduction. Budget shows General Fund spending UP by $3 million. Just cutting the desire to spend even more.

July 9, 2016 at 3 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City manager recommends staff cuts, no property tax rate increase for 2017

The budget shows that General Fund spending is going UP by $3 million. What is being cut is just the desire to spend even more. Property taxes are also increasing by 3.6%. Mill rate might be flat but tax dollars are increasing.

July 9, 2016 at 2:58 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers mull plans to keep schools open

Not at all. Privatizing Medicaid is a good concept. I only said that the cuts to Medicaid came about because Democrats and some Republicans refuse to impose basic efficiency measures.

June 17, 2016 at 2 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers mull plans to keep schools open

What can be done and what government chooses to do are two distinctly different issues. Medicaid cuts, for example, were implemented because Democrats and some Republicans refuse to entertain basic efficiency measures. Across the boards cuts are bad because that leaves the bureaucracy to decide upon implementation, and the bureaucracy protects itself.

June 17, 2016 at 7:57 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers mull plans to keep schools open

No, that's not the point. We propose a clearly defined math formula to determine whether minimum funding is being provided; if that number is not provided, the Legislature can be compelled to do so...although it would never come to that because legislators couldn't argue the point and wouldn't want that on their record. But just to be sure, maybe include a provision removing those from office who voted not to meet the number. The same must apply to schools; the point is to ensure that they meet their minimum requirements, so they lose accreditation otherwise.

June 16, 2016 at 11:22 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas lawmakers mull plans to keep schools open

Peter Hancock forgot to mention that our constitutional amendment proposal had a second part. We proposed two amendments be offered, with the one getting the most votes being implemented. One option (as he wrote) would remove the word 'suitable.' The other option retains 'suitable' but clearly defines it in a formula and also place minimum district-level achievement requirements, which must be met to retain accreditation; students in unaccredited districts automatically become eligible for Education Savings Accounts to attend the public or private school of their choice.

This way, citizens get to decide whether the Legislature AND schools should be accountable...or no one should be accountable.

June 16, 2016 at 8:47 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lawrence City Commission faced with dilemma: raise taxes or cut city staff

Yes, we have to work together, which, to me, means government should do a top to bottom assessment to reduce the cost of services while maintaining quality. That includes combining services with city and county governments to eliminate overlapping costs. Then they can reduce mill rates to produce the necessary revenue. Government's role is to provide necessary good quality services at the best possible price and citizens' role is to provide the revenue.

June 16, 2016 at 1:21 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Previous