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Dave_Trabert (Dave Trabert)

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Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

KPI is an independent think-tank that advocates for free market solutions, limited government and the protection of personal freedom. Our work centers on state and local economic policy with primary emphasis on education, tax and fiscal policy and transparency. We empower citizens, legislators, and other government officials with objective research and creative ideas to promote a low-tax, pro-growth environment that preserves the ability of governments to provide high quality services

November 20, 2014 at 12:28 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

These funds operate like a personal checkbook...the balance goes up when more money is deposited than is spent. The increases indicate that universities collected more than was needed to be spent, so we are proposing that some of that money be spent now.

I would be delighted to have a public debate with Jack Martin about cash management practices.

November 20, 2014 at 12:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

Universities would still have a reserve equal to the amount held in 2003 in that account. There is no record of universities claiming they had inadequate reserves. They did just fine with the previous amount and can do so again. Also, the reserves in this particular fund are only a small portion of total reserves.

Our plan shows how to balance the budget based on the new, lower revenue estimates. There is no need for tax increases or service reductions. The State just needs to make better use of existing resources and provide services at a better price.

November 19, 2014 at 8:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents, university officials fear budget cuts ahead

This article doesn't mention it but the source of the recommended reserve reduction is unspent tuition. The Kansas Policy Institute proposal doesn't address any of the other cash reserves held by universities...just their unspent tuition money. http://www.kansaspolicy.org/ResearchC...

Table 8 in the KPI plan shows that universities accumulated $75.6 million in unspent tuition between 2003 and 2014. The KPI Budget Plan recommends requiring the use of half of that money through a one-time reduction in state aid; we also recommend that universities offer a one-time reduction in tuition with the balance of the increase and collectively retain an $11.8 million reserve as existed in 2003.

Each university would have the same resources available to spend next year under our plan...the reduction in aid would be covered by the use of their unnecessary tuition reserves. Full aid would be restored the following year.

November 19, 2014 at 8:06 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas budget gaps have lawmakers mulling taxes

Yes, Morgenthau wanted higher taxes instead of debt. But that doesn't change the fact that dramatic increases in government spending, in his words, didn't work.

November 19, 2014 at 3:21 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas budget gaps have lawmakers mulling taxes

There is nothing in our plan that would eliminate or reduce a service. We're showing ways to provide services at a better price. You seem to equate spending a specific amount of money to achieve a specific level of service.

November 19, 2014 at 3:18 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas budget gaps have lawmakers mulling taxes

not true

November 19, 2014 at 1:19 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas budget gaps have lawmakers mulling taxes

Who said, “We have tried spending money. We are spending more than we have ever spent before and it does not work." Hint: he also said, “I say after eight years of this Administration we have just as much unemployment as when we started. … And an enormous debt to boot!”

None other than FDR's Secretary of the Treasury, Henry Morgenthau, Jr.

November 19, 2014 at 12:26 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas budget gaps have lawmakers mulling taxes

Regardless of one's opinion on tax reform, legislators have a responsibility to balance the budget. Very few were willing to discuss spending adjustments.

November 19, 2014 at 11:52 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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