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Exonerated, but still not free Joe Jones was the first person in the state to be exonerated of a crime by DNA evidence, but life after prison has been difficult. Now authorities have identified the man they say is responsible.

How witnesses can misidentify a suspect

Lawrence Wrightsman, a KU psychology professor, talks about the problems with eyewitness misidentification, particularly in cases where a victim and an offender are of different races. Wrightsman submitted a report to the court in at Jones’ 1986 trial, highlighting the issue.

Eyewitness Identification

Lawrence Wrightsman, a KU psychology professor, talks about the problems with eyewitness misidentification, particularly in cases where a victim and an offender are of different races. Wrightsman submitted a report to the court in at Jones' 1986 trial, highlighting the issue.

Eyewitnesses not always reliable

Psychology of racial preconceptions, trauma can influence statements

Lawrence Wrightsman, a Kansas University psychology professor who submitted a report in Joe Jones’ 1986 trial, points to many misconceptions when it comes to eyewitness identifications in criminal cases.

After trend of wrongful convictions nationwide, Topeka police change witness identification methods

With mounting evidence that eyewitness misidentifications have led to scores of wrongful convictions over the years, police are changing practices.

Eyewitness I.D. process changes

The Topeka Police Department, like many across the country, has updated their policy for eyewitness photo identifications. In the past, police often used a single sheet with six photos, known as a "six-pack." But research has found witness accuracy improves when shown photos one at a time. Det. Larry Falley of the Topeka Police explains the advantages of the new policy.

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