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Sound Off

Sound Off: I am a Lawrence property owner, resident and taxpayer. Why are city residents like myself not given priority to purchase the yard compost that we have funded? I observed many nonresidents picking up compost at the city sale recently.

Megan Gilliland, the city’s communications manager, provided this answer: The majority of the participants who purchase compost at the city’s compost sale events are Lawrence residents. The city does not currently require proof of residency at the compost sale, but it may be considered for future events.

Comments

heyitsme 1 year, 6 months ago

I am new to Lawrence (and YES, I am a resident, property owner and pay my taxes). I did not know about purchasing all this. Where is this located and when does it become available? Do they make an announcement in the paper?

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Alfred_W 1 year, 6 months ago

Did you know that 47% of Lawrence residents contribute no yard waste to the city's composting program? Yet these same people are the first to demand their share. We should be providing compost breaks to the biggest grass producers and not to the entitled moochers!

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budwhysir 1 year, 6 months ago

I would suggest being real nice to those 90102 Beverly Hills Jayhawk wanna bees, they are some compost conserving right wing rebels and they will make sure your compst supply runs out quick if they get wind of any plots against them.

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oneeye_wilbur 1 year, 6 months ago

Do not forget that one can own property in the City of Lawrence and pay taxes and city fees, etc but live outside of the city limits and even in another town nearby. So now what?

Exclude the taxpaying property owner because they do not have a 66044 zip code but rather a 90102, Beverly Hills address?

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Katara 1 year, 6 months ago

If there was only some way a homeowner could make their own compost. Perhaps putting it in some sort of bin to keep the critters out?

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budwhysir 1 year, 6 months ago

And just think, those people down here from out of town driving on our streets, eating at our fast food places, drinking our coffee, and all that.

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dwendel 1 year, 6 months ago

I got tired of bagging leaves and hauling them to the curb, then renting a trailer, paying and waiting in line to haul them back again the next year. I bought some stakes and chicken wire, made a bin, and am now composting my own leaves and yard waste (koi poop from the pond filter kicks it up a notch). Sometime I'm just awesome in the garden.

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rodentgirl16 1 year, 6 months ago

Can you say, "first world problems?"

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patkindle 1 year, 6 months ago

Duh, I am dumber than a box of rocks, and cant get out of Bed in the morning. I need to find a socal service group with will get me some mulch for my pot plants,but I don’t have any money to pay them i live in my step brother in laws house trailer cause no one will hire me

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Sarah St. John 1 year, 6 months ago

Did_I_say_that observed:

  1. Megan Gilliland, the city’s communications manager asserts that, "The majority of the participants ... are Lawrence residents."

  2. Does Megan Gilliland know every one of the 88,727 Lawrence residents by sight?

I don't know about previous years, but this year when I pulled up on one of the "freebie" days (for small amounts of compost), I was required to sign in with name and address. Presumably Megan G. was getting her information from those sign-in sheets (assuming everyone was honest with their info).

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patkindle 1 year, 6 months ago

i suspect alot of home owners employ the services of local landscapers to pick up and spread the mulch for them

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HutchSaltHawk 1 year, 6 months ago

I thought the sale was also limited to homeowners, but I usually find about as many professional landscape vehicles there as I do personal vehicles.

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Ceallach 1 year, 6 months ago

So, if I own twice as much property, and contribute twice as much compost material, shouldn't I be given priority over those with lesser land? And, because of my greater contribution, I should be able to purchase twice as much compost for the same price as the above mentioned lesser land owner. Right?

1

peartree 1 year, 6 months ago

I am against voter ID laws, but this is not the same thing. Residents are paying for a product they may choose to take, but that product is being (at times) hoarded by nonresidents and contractors.

Voter ID laws (often) deny the rights of citizens. The goal of verifying where you live, in the case of the compost, is absolutely trying to protect the investments of citizens. It doesn't have to be an ID, just a bill or something easy.

Let's say you are a Native person living on a Reservation that produces oil and shares the profits. Would you by okay with handing out cash to anyone that pulls up and claims to live there? Same idea...

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Matthew Herbert 1 year, 6 months ago

Using the same logic as is routinely applied to voter i.d:

if we require i.d to buy compost, won't that disproportionately affect low-income and minority gardeners?

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RoeDapple 1 year, 6 months ago

What the flip?? Show ID for compost but not to vote? What this town needs is more . . . . cowbell!

2

weiser 1 year, 6 months ago

Vote Obama, no ID required.

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autie 1 year, 6 months ago

I really hate it when they take the compost material from my property and then hoard in some government facility, only to redistribute it to all of those not willing to make their own compost. This is pure socialism and will lead us all to economic disaster and communism. When the means of all compost is in the hands of the government, we are in trouble. Only privatization of composting will save us.

5

peartree 1 year, 6 months ago

I think both the contractor issue and out of town folk coming in are valid concerns. I do think contractors should have to wait until Saturday, if they are allowed at all. This is a service subsidized by taxpayers, and they should benefit. Yes, it is great for the environment, but those paying for it still should benefit. Also, there is an easy way around the residency problem: show an ID or a bill with an address. I can't imagine too many people who would need compost would have trouble coming up with one of those.

4

smitty 1 year, 6 months ago

A past JW editorial thank you from a Tongie resident for the compost answers the question.

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Aimee Polson 1 year, 6 months ago

From what I understand, with the new compost distribution method that was implemented this fall, not as much was taken and the city still has compost available.

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jessie 1 year, 6 months ago

Pretty tough to judge by license plates, as others have indicated, they could have borrowed the truck.

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kernal 1 year, 6 months ago

I think the person who submitted the question is referring to people from out side of Douglas County. He probably noticed some of the out of county license plates.

The spring the city ran out of free compost for the locals, a friend noticed a couple of guys with Missouri plates on their pickups loading up compost.

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fan4kufootball 1 year, 6 months ago

How does person who asked the question know they are non-residents? Vehicle tag? It could be that the resident doesnt have the proper vehicle to pick up compost and had a relative/friend who does pick it up for them.

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gccs14r 1 year, 6 months ago

How about a "no contractors until Sunday" rule? Most homeowners don't have a chance to get over there until Saturday, and these days most of it is gone by then. It's disheartening to see the parade of commercial trucks and trailers leaving the compost area laden with tons of the stuff. I even saw a dumptruck once.

Maybe start the compost sale on Saturday and continue it through Tuesday if there's enough left. That gives homeowners a decent chance of getting what they need, instead of scrambling for scraps.

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Russell Fryberger 1 year, 6 months ago

With the SLT finally going through there should be plenty of swamp compost for all real soon. Lets all just get along.

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budwhysir 1 year, 6 months ago

Could you explain "priority" status??

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Matthew Herbert 1 year, 6 months ago

Who cares? The program is not designed to guarantee a supply of sellable compost, it is designed to keep huge piles of biodegradeable goods out of the landfill and to that end, it's successful.

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Richard Heckler 1 year, 6 months ago

I say the whiner has a legitimate concern if the compost offered up is being sold out.

Then again is the compost material from the city proper or is it county wide?

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Benjamin Roberts 1 year, 6 months ago

Three observations:

1. The Whiner asserts that he/she, "...observed many nonresidents picking up compost..."

2. Megan Gilliland, the city’s communications manager asserts that, "The majority of the participants ... are Lawrence residents."

3. Megan Gilliiland also states that, "The city does not currently require proof of residency..."

Questions:

1. Does the Whiner and Megan Gilliland know every one of the 88,727 Lawrence residents by sight?

2. How can anyone know the residency of participants if no one actually checks?

Conclusion: A picture ID should be required of all participants to determine residency. Non-residents should be provided compost on a contingency basis.

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oneeye_wilbur 1 year, 6 months ago

They must be related to no more than 3 people and live in single family zoning.

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parrothead8 1 year, 6 months ago

What does a Lawrence nonresident look like?

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