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Sound Off: Where can I take corroded ammunition for disposal?

City spokeswoman Megan Gilliland said the Lawrence Police Department will take old ammunition for disposal. Anyone needing this service can contact the department by calling Douglas County dispatch at 785-832-7509 or taking it to the law enforcement center at 111 E. 11th St.

Comments

oldvet 2 years, 5 months ago

Who in their right mind lets ammo get corroded? Shoot it up and replace it with new ammo before it gets to that point. And take care of what you have. I'm still shooting military '68 headstamps in my M-1.

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LadyJ 2 years, 5 months ago

Never know what you will find in a deceased relative's closet. Some things you can't talk even about. :0)

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Fossick 2 years, 5 months ago

Once cleaning out a closet with a relative and she held something up and said, "Look, it's Grandma's old douchebag." I looked at her across the room, horrified. Cousin said, "No, no, she only used it for enemas." Like that was any better.

Promise not to talk about that again.

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RoeDapple 2 years, 5 months ago

A friend was showing me his German Luger his father brought home as a war trophy. He said his dad only shot it twice when he got back to the states. The clip was still loaded, less 2 rounds. I will let him know.

Also, due to my interest in all things "projectile", for years people have given me bullets that were just "laying around", thinking I would know what to do with them. This seems a much better alternative to throwing them in the burn barrel. (Forget I said that. And don't try this at home. I'm a professional.)

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Liberty275 2 years, 5 months ago

While stationed in Germany, we could go to certain spots in the surrounding woods and find ammo the Germans had abandoned while running from The Third Army. we found lots of rifle bullets and a few AA rounds, like 30MM. The area is pockmarked still with 20 foot deep bomb craters as well. On one hunt, my roommate brought back a 30 pound bomb that had failed to detonate. Upon finding out, the barracks were evacuated EOD was called in to dispose of the bomb.

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Flap Doodle 2 years, 5 months ago

Drive it to the KC airport & leave it sitting in a parking lot. (I didn't say that)

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Fossick 2 years, 5 months ago

Colonel, I knew I liked you for some reason.

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RoeDapple 2 years, 5 months ago

Yup. I have one of those green plastic "inertia" bullet extractors. Every time I hammer a round apart I wonder if it will be the last . . .

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Flap Doodle 2 years, 5 months ago

Yeah, it just seems wrong to go whacky-whack on something with a cartridge in it.

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Sharfire 2 years, 5 months ago

Take it to the local police station?

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otto 2 years, 5 months ago

They do what autie said, burn some stuff, go fishing and recycle the brass to buy beer, it's a win win.

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RoeDapple 2 years, 5 months ago

autie (anonymous) says… "pull the bullets and melt them down for sinkers."

Or pull the bullets and melt them down for . . . new bullets!

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headdoctor 2 years, 5 months ago

One does wonder where they were keeping this stuff. There is WW2, Korean, and Vietnam era rounds that still work fine. There were tons of the large sardine cans 2 to a case of 7.62x39 Vietnam era rounds stored out in the jungle that still work great. You just have to make sure you clean the bore often because they are made with corrosive powder which is also why it is still good as well as being sealed in the cans.

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RoeDapple 2 years, 5 months ago

I have fired 1907 manufactured .30-40 Krag that looked good and still went through the chronograph at 1950fps. I have seen .38 special stored in an unheated garage less than five years old that was nothing but junk, brass and lead showing major corrosion. When they say "Store in a cool, dry place" that says it all.

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