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Professor on trial - The murder of Carmen Ross

Police say tapes help cases stick
Juries, public increasingly expect to see video of suspect interviews
August 15, 2005
When Lawrence Police wanted to interview a suspect in a 3-year-old baby’s death in late June, they drove him all the way from Kansas City to Lawrence before starting their questioning.
Court steps in for children whose fathers killed mothers
July 24, 2005
In the past year, Melodie Miller and her younger brother, Matthew, have lost both their parents: one to a murder, the other to prison.
Stories from Murray case hit the air
May 14, 2005
For nearly a year, Detective Doug Woods lost sleep because he felt responsible for not getting a confession out of a professor suspected of killing his ex-wife. Woods said he’d wake up in the night and ask himself, “Could I have asked questions in a different way?”
Murray given life in prison
Defendant won’t be eligible for parole for 25 years
May 7, 2005
A Kansas State University English professor convicted of murdering his ex-wife stood up in court at sentencing Friday afternoon and called the case against him a “fairy tale.”
Murray proclaims innocence, but sentenced to life in prison
May 6, 2005
(Updated Friday at 3:47 p.m.) A Kansas State University English professor convicted of murdering his ex-wife stood up in court today at his sentencing and called the case against him “a fairy tale.”
Murray trial excerpts online
April 3, 2005
The murder trial that led to the conviction of a Kansas State University professor last month involved hundreds of exhibits — most notably, his nearly 10-hour videotaped statement to police.
Friend’s murder led prosecutor to study law
March 19, 2005
A phone call from the father of a murdered schoolmate helped get Angela Wilson on the career path that led to her successful prosecution this week of a Kansas State University professor for the death of his ex-wife.
K-State professor convicted of murder
Verdict elicits little reaction from Murray
March 18, 2005
When he talked to police after his ex-wife’s brutal death, Thomas E. Murray told them: “There’s no such thing as the perfect murder… The bad guy always gets caught.” On Thursday, after more than two full days of deliberation, a Douglas County jury found Murray, a Kansas State University English professor, guilty of stabbing and beating Carmin D. Ross to death in November 2003.
Ross’ family finds relief in conviction
March 18, 2005
The suspicions began almost immediately. The first time Thomas E. Murray saw his former in-laws after the murder of his ex-wife, Carmin D. Ross, it was Nov. 16, 2003, two days after her body was found. The Ross family counted at least 16 odd statements they say he made to them.
Guilty verdict returned in Murray trial
March 17, 2005
(Updated Thursday at 2:24 p.m.) After more than two full days of deliberation, a Douglas County jury this morning found English professor Thomas E. Murray guilty of killing his ex-wife in November 2003.
After 17 hours, no word from jury in Murray murder trial
March 17, 2005
For the past month, the public has been free to discuss developments in the murder trial of Kansas State University professor Thomas E. Murray.
After two days, still no verdict in Murray trial
March 16, 2005
(Updated Thursday at 9:50 a.m.) After two full days of deliberation, a Douglas County jury still did not have a verdict late this afternoon in the murder trial of Kansas State University professor Thomas E. Murray.
Tuesday spent waiting for jury
Full day of deliberation passes without verdict
March 16, 2005
In the nearly empty courtroom Tuesday, a CBS News crew trained a video camera at the clock on the wall. Nearby, bailiff Lewis Roberts sat guarding the door leading from the courtroom to the jury room.
6News: Prosecutor critiques Murray’s statement to police
March 15, 2005
During closing arguments, prosecutor Tom Bath urges jurors to watch Murray’s videotaped statement to police and asks, “Is that how an innocent man would act?”
6News: Defense explains Murray’s Internet searches
March 15, 2005
During closing arguments, defense attorney Pedro Irigonegaray tells jurors Murray could have been searching for murder-related terms on the Internet because he wanted to write TV-drama scripts.