Syndicated Columns

Opinion: Conservative victory shocks Britain
May 12, 2015
“Shocked,” “surprised,” “stunned” were some of the words used by broadcasters, columnists, political “experts” and pollsters when a Conservative Party victory was forecast by exit polls on election night.
Opinion: Huckabee an embarrassment to GOP
May 11, 2015
In the 1950s, during one of his two campaigns as the Democrats’ presidential nominee, Adlai Stevenson was invited to address a gathering of Baptists in Houston, where in 1960 John Kennedy would address a group of Protestant ministers to refute charges that his Catholicism rendered him unfit to be president. This was an opinion vociferously promulgated by Norman Vincent Peale, a broadcast preacher and author of “The Power of Positive Thinking.” The man introducing Stevenson said the candidate had been invited only “as a courtesy” because Peale “has instructed us to vote for your opponent.” In response, Stevenson repeated a quip he had made when, in 1952, Peale said Stevenson was unfit to be president because he was divorced. Stevenson said: “I find the Apostle Paul appealing and the Apostle Peale appalling.”
Opinion: GOP takes anti-government turn
May 10, 2015
Some folks thought it was “inflammatory.” Some said it was “irresponsible,” others, “absurd,” still others, “disappointing.”
Opinion: Attitudes on animal treatment evolving
May 9, 2015
We often wonder how people of the past, including the most revered and refined, could have universally engaged in conduct now considered unconscionable. Such as slavery. How could the Founders, so sublimely devoted to human liberty, have lived with — some participating in — human slavery? Or four score years later, how could the saintly Lincoln, an implacable opponent of slavery, have nevertheless spoken of and believed in African inferiority?
Opinion: Netanyahu’s support shaky at home
May 8, 2015
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been a dominating political figure in the U.S. this year, seemingly invincible as he hurled thunderbolts at President Obama and other adversaries. But here in Israel, not so much.
Opinion: Rhode Island has option to Clinton
May 7, 2015
America’s smallest state — one Nevada county is nearly eight times larger — has the longest name: In a 2010 referendum, voters kept the official title, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. The state also has a dark-horse presidential candidate who is the only Democratic candidate so far who can shoe a horse. “Put a blacksmith in the White House” could be Lincoln Chafee’s slogan.
Opinion: Baltimore mother acting on instinct
May 7, 2015
A few thoughts about Toya Graham, just in time for Mother’s Day. You may not know her name, but you probably know what she did. You’ve probably seen the viral video of Graham, during last week’s unrest in Baltimore, using some rather pungent language and some open-handed smacks upside the head to pull her 16-year-old son out of the riot zone. She told CBS News he had gone there in defiance of her orders. When she saw him, dressed for mayhem in a black face mask, rock in hand, “I just lost it.”
Opinion: New files shed light on bin Laden
May 6, 2015
In the months before his death in May 2011, Osama bin Laden was discussing new gambits — from a truce with Pakistan to opportunistic alliances with jihadist groups spawned by the Arab Spring — so that he could focus on tipping what he called “the balance of fear” with his main enemy, the United States.
Opinion: Pacific deal could hurt Latin America
May 5, 2015
When President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met in Washington last week to discuss creating the world’s biggest trade bloc with 10 other Pacific Rim nations, most Latin American countries didn’t pay any attention. But they should have.
Opinion: British campaigns shorter, more prickly
May 5, 2015
They called it “Question Time,” borrowing the term from the prime minister’s weekly appearance in the House of Commons, but this was surprisingly and refreshingly different.
Opinion: Rebels may push Mideast diplomacy
May 4, 2015
U.S. and Iranian officials have been insisting the last several years that they wanted to resolve the nuclear issue before discussing the sectarian wars that are raging across the Middle East. Not anymore. As the battles have escalated in recent months, so has talk about regional diplomacy.