Archive for Sunday, January 15, 2017

Lawrence escapes overnight ice storm but Sunday morning accumulations possible

Icicles form Sunday on the bottom of holiday lights that still decorate trees in downtown Lawrence. Although Douglas County escaped a predicted overnight ice storm, rains Sunday morning coupled with temperatures below freezing allowed icy conditions.

Icicles form Sunday on the bottom of holiday lights that still decorate trees in downtown Lawrence. Although Douglas County escaped a predicted overnight ice storm, rains Sunday morning coupled with temperatures below freezing allowed icy conditions.

January 15, 2017

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Lawrence and Douglas County dodged the ice storm predicted for Saturday and this morning but are not quite out of the woods.

Audra Hennecke, meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Topeka, said rain was moving into the county at about 9:30 a.m. With reported temperatures in Lawrence ranging from 30 to 33 degrees, the city could see about a tenth of inch of ice before it warms above freezing at about noon, she said.

“It’s now a race between temperature and the rain,” Hennecke said.

Lawrence was spared a predicted quarter-inch of ice accumulation when moisture was slow to lift northward, Hennecke said. The Topeka NWS office was receiving reports from Anderson County of quarter to half inch of ice on trees and some tree damage, she said.

Weather will moderate starting Monday, Hennecke said. Temperaturers should be near 50 degrees tomorrow, fall a bit Tuesday and then be back in the 50s through Friday, she said.

Comments

Fred Whitehead Jr. 3 months, 1 week ago

"Lawrence and Douglas County dodged the ice storm predicted for Saturday" Yeah, I sort of imagined this. The channel 9 news had predicted the end of the world in their coverage a week ahead of the "great storm"

Weather reporting and prediction is a dicy undertaking at best, but the habit of making such overriding predictions a week out are really poor reporting. The weather reporting needs to take a chill pill and hold off on the predictions of doom.

Mike Gant 3 months, 1 week ago

It's almost impossible to make an accurate weather forecast more than three days out. Even then it's a crapshoot. Meteorologists all know and understand that but none of them will come out and admit it to the public. Anytime a weather person claims the end is near, you can bet that nine times out of ten it's more about ratings (and perhaps stock in a local grocery chain) than any true foresight or knowledge. There are some cities where the weathermen make a season long forecast or even an annual (!) forecast that they present in an hour long special. It may as well be weather-based fan fiction.

Joe Blackford II 3 months, 1 week ago

I would appreciate a "following day" analysis anytime the forecasted high/low is off by more than X degrees (10 deg F, say).

I have long compared meteorologists' forecasts to a pizza joint's estimate of when your pizza will be ready, & whether it will arrive "hot" or "cold."

Paul Beyer 3 months, 1 week ago

It's2 PM. Just drove across town,no ice in sight. The weather forecasters much all be Republicans, have a deep seated need to scare people.

Charles L. Bloss, Jr. 3 months, 1 week ago

Being a weather forecaster is the only job I know of that you can be consistently wrong, and still keep your job. I am not saying the job is easy, but I take their dire predictions of ice storms, snow accumulation and tornadoes with a grain of salt. They very rarely ever affect us in the manner they are predicted.

Terry Sexton 3 months, 1 week ago

You should use more than one grain of salt to help with the icing.

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