Archive for Sunday, August 27, 2017

World War I in Lawrence: 10 Journal-World employees report for duty

August 27, 2017

Editor’s note: As the U.S. marks the 100th anniversary of its entry into World War I this year, local writer Sarah St. John will compile reports of what it was like to be in Lawrence at that time.

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The Lawrence Journal-World was to face challenges in the coming year, as several of its staff had enlisted in the military. Even considering the inconvenience that this would entail, the company appeared proud that so many of its men were to serve, either as volunteers or after having been called in the initial draft:

“It is doubtful if any publication in the United States will be represented in the army by as large a percentage of present and former employes as the Journal-World. It will be remembered by some that the call to the Mexican border last year, took six men from the Journal-World office, but that number has now increased to ten. Even with this big list the paper is not to escape, for the thirtieth number reported this morning calls for Cargill Sproull, who is to be city editor in the place of Capt. Murray. This means that with the next call for men Mr. Sproull will have to leave his post on the paper to join the men in the field. Among those actively in the service of the Journal-World who are either serving under a former enlistment, or have recently enlisted, are:

Capt. J. W. Murray, Managing Editor.

2nd Lieut. Clinton Kanaga, Advertising Manager.

George W. Smith, Reporter.

Earl A. Farris, Advertising compositor.

Sam Harvey, Pressman.

R. B. Church, Pressman.

A. G. Hill, University reporter.

Ormond Hill, University reporter.

Lawrence Bowersock, carrier.

E. W. Thomasson, Compositor.

“… There were still others who offered their services, but who were unable to pass the examination owing to minor disqualifications. It is certainly a list of which to be proud, not only as to numbers, but as to men.”

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