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Archive for Wednesday, September 18, 2013

100 years ago: Vendors want to sell 2% alcoholic drinks at county fair, but is it legal?

September 18, 2013

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Sept. 18, 1913:

  • "Has a human being the capacity to hold enough alcohol in two per cent solution to cause a physical, mental or spiritual state generally known as the state of intoxication? That is a question that is worrying numerous ambitious ones who would amass a fortune by selling 'two per cent' at the Douglas County Fair next week, to say nothing of County Attorney J. S. Amick, whose duty it is to prosecute any offenders of the state prohibitory law. Even Attorney General John Dawson admits he can't solve the problem.... The Kansas law states that the sale of intoxicating liquors is prohibited within the boundaries of the state except under certain conditions that do not include county fairs. The law makers who passed that law were not inclined to be exact, hence this problem. The law mentions no given per cent of alcohol that shall make the sale of liquor containing it an offense punishable by law."
  • "Score another for milk in the Grand High Cost of Living Contest. The product from the dairy jumped 8 1/3 cents a quart on the local market yesterday. Local dairymen are now selling ten quart tickets for one dollar. This is the highest price at which milk has ever sold in this city. The hike to seven cents a quart was a great shock to the average purse, but the latest raise makes milk more of a luxury now than ever. For years and years the product of the cow was sold at five cents a quart. It was a standard price everywhere. Then came the High Cost of Living and with everything else advancing upward the dairyman did his share of boosting and milk ascended to six cents. This figure prevailed for a short time but there being no apparent cessation of the H. C. of L. the milk figure was hiked again, this time to seven cents. Today the third ascension was announced.... The past dry summer had much to do with the last raise in price. Dairymen must pay more for their feed and pastures are dry and barren. Perhaps a better year in the future will bring the price back down again, but in the meantime 8 1/3 cent milk enters the luxury class. Milk has been regarded as a household necessity for centuries, but at this figure it must pass from its old position into the new one which the H. C. of L. has prepared for it."
  • "A man said to be stealing a ride on a Union Pacific train near Lenape, east of Lawrence, last night, was killed. The body could not be identified. It was taken in charge by Coroner Davis of Leavenworth county. It was rumored in Lawrence this morning that the man was a Union Pacific brakeman but this proved to be untrue."
  • "Classes opened on the hill this morning with over 1,900 students registered and enrolled for the work of the year. At noon today Registrar George O. Foster reported the figure at 1,940. Registrar Foster is immensely pleased with the registration thus far and is more confident than ever that a new record will be established this year.... The formal opening of the year will be held tomorrow morning when former Governor E. W. Hoch delivers the annual opening address.... Mount Oread has assumed its usual appearance again now, the town is alive with students and soon the college year will be well under way."
  • "A test of wheat made by A. H. Greisa proved his wheat to be in excellent condition. Selecting fifty grains of wheat Mr. Greisa applied the test and found that every one of them sprouted. This would disprove the rumor that the wheat raised this year is not good for seed."

Comments

Sarah St. John 1 year, 2 months ago

"A man said to be stealing a ride on a Union Pacific train near Lenape, east of Lawrence, last night, was killed. The body could not be identified. It was taken in charge by Coroner Davis of Leavenworth county. It was rumored in Lawrence this morning that the man was a Union Pacific brakeman but this proved to be untrue."

From skyways.org: "Lenape, a village of Leavenworth county, is situated in the extreme southeastern portion on the Kansas river and the Union Pacific R. R. about 20 miles southwest of Kansas City. It has two general stores, a telegraph station, a money order postoffice, and in 1910 had a population of 85."

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