Advertisement

Archive for Thursday, October 31, 2013

Schodorf files to run for Kansas secretary of state

October 31, 2013

Advertisement

— Former state Sen. Jean Schodorf today filed to run for Kansas secretary of state against incumbent Republican Kris Kobach in 2014.

Schodorf, who served in the Legislature as a Republican from Wichita but switched to the Democratic Party, was introduced by former Senate President Steve Morris, a Republican from Hugoton.

"We absolutely need someone with the integrity that Jean Schodorf has. She will put her heart and soul into being secretary of state to do an outstanding job for the citizens of Kansas," Morris said.

Former state Sen. Jean Schodorf, a Republican-turned-Democrat, is running against Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

Former state Sen. Jean Schodorf, a Republican-turned-Democrat, is running against Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

Both Schodorf and Morris were among a group of moderate Republicans who were defeated in the GOP primary in 2012 by those who supported Gov. Sam Brownback. Schodorf has since become a Democrat, while Morris remains a Republican.

Schodorf blamed Kobach for the current "voter registration mess" in which approximately 17,200 Kansans' registrations are in limbo because of the new law that requires proof of citizenship.

Kobach has said the law is needed to prevent undocumented immigrants from voting, but critics say it will suppress voting. In response to Schodorf's criticism, he said the law is "working exactly as the Legislature and I expected. Some people take their time completing their voting registrations and some don't."

Schodorf said Kobach had two years lead time to make sure voter registration ran smoothly and he "failed."

Schodorf said Kobach's attention to his job had been diverted by his work in other states pushing for stringent anti-illegal immigration laws. Kobach said he works on laws in other states on his own time, filing legal briefs from his home.

Asked if she thought her changing parties would be a negative, Schodorf said, "This year more than ever, we have seen what the far right extreme has done to the country. There is a group of people from both sides, Democrats and Republicans and independents who are in the middle, who want good government."

Earlier, Randy Rolston, a Johnson County businessman, dropped out of the Democratic race for secretary of state, citing health issues in his family, and he threw his support behind Schodorf.

Comments

Kevin Groenhagen 1 year, 1 month ago

"This year more than ever, we have seen what the far right extreme has done to the country."

Quite an ironic statement when you consider that Schodorf has switched to a party that, at the national level, is dominated by the Congressional Progressive Caucus, which is aligned with Democratic Socialists of America. DSA is part of the Socialist International, which, according to Michael Harrington, the late chairman of the DSA, claims "direct descent from Marx's International Workingmen's Association."

"Extreme” is derived from "exterus," meaning “foreign.” Marxism has always been considered a foreign ideology in this country. That is where the term "American exceptionalism" originally came from.

Frank McGuinness 1 year, 1 month ago

Republicans are typically associated with trickle down economics which according to a recent NONPARTISAN Congressional Research Report "that lowering marginal tax rates for the wealthiest Americans had no effect on economic growth or job creation" "The results of the analysis suggest that changes over the past 65 years in the top marginal tax rate and the top capital gains tax rate do not appear correlated with economic growth. The reduction in the top tax rates appears to be uncorrelated with saving, investment, and productivity growth. The top tax rates appear to have little or no relation to the size of the economic pie.

However, the top tax rate reductions appear to be associated with the increasing concentration of income at the top of the income distribution. As measured by IRS data, the share of income accruing to the top 0.1% of U.S. families increased from 4.2% in 1945 to 12.3% by 2007 before falling to 9.2% due to the 2007-2009 recession. At the same time, the average tax rate paid by the top 0.1% fell from over 50% in 1945 to about 25% in 2009. Tax policy could have a relation to how the economic pie is sliced—lower top tax rates may be associated with greater income disparities. "

1 year, 1 month ago

"Republicans are typically associated with trickle down economics which according to a recent NONPARTISAN Congressional Research Report..."

Let's accept this as true for the moment. Isn't it also true that "trickle down economics" is exactly the same as "the wealth effect" that the current administration is using to jump start the economy?

Under Trickle-down, the rich got tax cuts which was supposed to spur growth thru investment and spending. Under the present administration, the Fed buys $85b a month in bonds, which money flows into financial markets and housing, making people feel richer, causing them to spur growth thru investment and spending.

The funny thing is, they are the same people in each case. Who has high incomes and benefited from the GOP tax cuts? The same people that have fat stock portfolios and benefit from QE. In each case, the idea is to enrich the rich so that money will flow thru the economy.

I find it absolutely amazing that the people who complain that the rich keep getting richer are the same people who point to a record high stock market as proof that certain policies are working. Of course they are working. It is precisely those policies that are causing the rich to get richer.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.