Advertisement

Archive for Saturday, November 9, 2013

Baldwin City woman collects her father’s Congressional Gold Medal for WWII

November 9, 2013

Advertisement

Gail Reed, of Baldwin City, is heading to Washington, D.C., to pick up a Congressional Gold Medal that is being presented posthumously to her father, a Comanche code talker in World War II.

Gail Reed, of Baldwin City, is heading to Washington, D.C., to pick up a Congressional Gold Medal that is being presented posthumously to her father, a Comanche code talker in World War II.

World War II Comanche code talker Wellington Mihecoby will be awarded a Congressional Gold Medal, presented posthumously to his daughter, Gail Reed, of Baldwin City, in Washington, D.C., later this month.

World War II Comanche code talker Wellington Mihecoby will be awarded a Congressional Gold Medal, presented posthumously to his daughter, Gail Reed, of Baldwin City, in Washington, D.C., later this month.

Comanche code talker Wellington Mihecoby, kneeling in front row, far right and pictured with other Comanche code talkers, will be awarded a Congressional Gold Medal, presented posthumously to his daughter, Gail Reed, of Baldwin City, in Washington, D.C., later this month.

Comanche code talker Wellington Mihecoby, kneeling in front row, far right and pictured with other Comanche code talkers, will be awarded a Congressional Gold Medal, presented posthumously to his daughter, Gail Reed, of Baldwin City, in Washington, D.C., later this month.

Gail Reed remembers her late father, Wellington Mihecoby, as a verbose man with a booming voice.

“Daddy was very vocal,” said Reed, of Baldwin City. “He loved to talk in public, and he never used a microphone.”

But her father could be reticent on some topics. For example, he rarely talked about his service in World War II and never spoke about how he used that distinctive loud voice with the U.S. Army’s 4th Signal Corps.

The reason, Reed said, was that it was a top-secret mission and continued to be so after his discharge in August 1945.

Her father was a Comanche code talker in Europe during World War II. From frontline positions, the code talkers sent radio or field telephone reports that eavesdropping Germans couldn’t understand to fellow Comanches posted in rear headquarters.

The Comanche code talkers, as well as those from 24 other American Indian tribes, will be recognized for their service with a Congressional Gold Medal at a Nov. 20 ceremony in the U.S. Capitol Building. Eight other tribes will receive the medal at a later date.

The presentation of the nation’s highest civilian honor to the tribes will end a nine-year effort to secure the honor. Only one of the code talkers from the tribes to be honored is still alive. Reed’s father, a department head at the Navajo Boarding School in Shiprock, N.M., died in 1975 of complications from diabetes, she said.

Lanny Asepermy, veterans’ historian for the Comanche Nation, said Mihecoby was one of 17 young tribal men fluent in Comanche who answered the U.S. Army’s call in December 1941 for a special assignment. They all knew each other from attending Fort Sill Indian School.

“They dressed in military uniforms there and had drills,” he said. “They all hunted, so they knew how to use a rifle. They would have been familiar with military routine when they joined the Army.”

They weren’t allowed to speak their native language while at the school, Asepermy said.

Her father’s story

Mihecoby was the oldest of the recruits and among the best educated, Asepermy and Reed said. As such, he assumed a leadership position with the code talkers.

Although mostly silent about his wartime experiences, Mihecoby did tell his children he was among those who hit Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. But Reed said she didn’t know what he did after D-Day and the battle for Normandy that followed.

That story is briefly told in the discharge papers her father preserved inside a leather pouch, along with a 1947 newspaper clipping about his wedding.

Issued on Aug. 24, 1945, or one week before his 31st birthday, the discharge papers state that Mihecoby followed the Normandy campaign with participation in the liberation of northern France, took a detour to fight in the Battle of the Bulge and then crossed into Germany for the Rhineland campaign. At the end of the war in May 1945, he was fighting in central Europe.

The duties in forward positions put the Comanche in dangerous positions but all survived the war. His discharge papers reveal Mihecoby was awarded a bronze and a silver star for his actions in combat.

Most Native American code talkers served in the Pacific because the German command was aware Americans used four Comanche and a number of Choctaws in World War I for the same purpose, Asepermy said. In an attempt to reduce their effectiveness in another war, German researchers were sent to the United States in the 1930s to learn Native American languages.

Asepermy said he didn’t know if the Comanche language was one of those the Germans studied. But it would have done the Germans no good because, as part of their training, the Comanche and code talkers from all tribes developed code words that hid the meaning of messages they communicated.

Comanche contributions relatively unknown

The Navajo’s exploits were best known because 420 code talkers, more than from any other tribe, served in with the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater, Asepermy said.

With the recognition that came with those numbers, the Navajo code talkers were recognized with a Congressional Gold Medal in 2000, Asepermy said. The efforts to secure the same honor for those from other tribes began in 2006. As the point person for the Comanche, he traveled from his Lawton, Okla., home to Washington, D.C., annually from 2006 through 2008 to lobby for the measure.

“Congressional Gold Medals have to be approved by two-thirds majorities of both houses,” Asepermy said. “It failed four times before it passed.”

Reed said she would be among the Comanche delegation at the ceremony with her younger sister and brother and two sons, Tony and Scott.

Comanche Nation officials will receive the Congressional Gold Medal, while she will receive a silver replica and grandchildren will receive bronze replicas, she said.

France recognized the Comanche code talkers’ contribution in the fight to liberate that country in 1989 with a Chavalier of the National Order of Merit, Reed said. And the French have invited the descendants of the code talkers on an expenses-paid trip to be part of a ceremony in Normandy, she said.

“I’ll be able to walk where he landed on Utah Beach,” she said. “Daddy would have liked that.”

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.