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Sports

Jackson deal restructured

March 6, 2013

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— The Kansas City Chiefs have restructured the contract of defensive end Tyson Jackson, freeing up space under the salary cap as free agency approaches.

Jackson has become a valuable part of the defensive line, but not the star the Chiefs hoped when they selected him third overall in the 2009 draft. Partly as a result of that high selection, Jackson would have made $14.72 million and counted $17.5 million toward the cap this season.

The details of his restructured deal were not available, but it should leave more flexibility for new Chiefs general manager John Dorsey and coach Andy Reid to pursue free agents.

Comments

Steve Jacob 1 year, 9 months ago

I have never seen an NFL team spend so much money to keep players from a 2-14 team.

Richard Heckler 1 year, 9 months ago

Taxpayers are forced to spend billions in subsidies annually aka corporate welfare to support professional sports such as football. Taxpayers own the stadiums the teams don't.

Now think of what people pay for tickets,brew and food in stadiums that they own.

jhawkinsf 1 year, 9 months ago

Now think of all the people employed inside that stadium. Hundreds of families dependent upon that job to put food on their table and clothes on their backs. Now think of the hotels filled when teams from distant cities come to town, bringing with them hundreds of their most loyal fans. More jobs as those hotels fill, restaurants serve them, bars serve up a brew or three. Those hundreds employed inside the stadium become thousands when those employed nearby are added to the count.

Yep, the team wins when billionaires have stadiums built for them. But the city wins as well. Thousands of families win. And should the team itself win, going to the playoffs and maybe even winning, the business activity that generates causes more spending and more hiring.

Cities like New Orleans, Miami and Phoenix compete against each other for the rights to host major events like the Super Bowl. The reason they do that is they know that the business activity such events create more than offset their investment. Personally, I see nothing wrong with seeking win/win situations.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 9 months ago

"Personally, I see nothing wrong with seeking win/win situations."

Sports hysteria is not "win-win."

jhawkinsf 1 year, 9 months ago

If it produces jobs in a jobs starved market, then it is. Or would you rather all those working at the stadium be without that job? Would you rather all those hotel workers be without that job? Would you rather all those restaurant workers and tavern workers be without that job? Unless you're willing to hire them, I suggest you step aside and let someone else do it.

Richard Heckler 1 year, 9 months ago

Tell me when do taxpayers see a payback after being forced to shell out billions annually to be sure players are paid enough and to keep the stadiums open?

If these athletic corporations could stand on their own there would be no concerns. They might if the athletes jumbo pay were cut. If large CEO salaries wee cut. If large salaries across the board were cut. If people want monster salaries that's great and wonderful IF the money is being generated within the corporations.

If those same billions upon billions were poured into the public education system and higher education systems we would see a payback in preparing our body and minds to become productive blue and white collar money makers for the USA. Benefitting the many.

Instead of USA students taking on gobs of debt to be successful.

jhawkinsf 1 year, 9 months ago

The taxpayers see the return when thousands of jobs pay billions in wages, which in turn creates millions in sales taxes when those wages are spent. Rents are paid, houses bought, which bolsters the tax base via property taxes.

Business activity creates taxes, plain and simple. If that activity more than compensates for the investment the city makes, then it's a win/win. And it is a win/win when the Super Bowl comes to your city. Ask the mayors of the many cities that compete. Kansas City might not get a Super Bowl, but last year's NAIA basketball tournament was great for them. Lawrence might not get an NAIA basketball tournament, but we can get some AAU tournaments, which would be good for us.

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