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Archive for Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Brownback rings Kansas bell to mark King speech

The Rev. Gordon Glenn, left, and Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback ring a bell during a commemoration of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, Wednesday, August 28, 2013, in Topeka, Kansas. Brownback led a ceremony at the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site to commemorate the 50th anniversary of King's speech during the 1963 March on Washington. (AP Photo/John Milburn)

The Rev. Gordon Glenn, left, and Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback ring a bell during a commemoration of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, Wednesday, August 28, 2013, in Topeka, Kansas. Brownback led a ceremony at the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site to commemorate the 50th anniversary of King's speech during the 1963 March on Washington. (AP Photo/John Milburn)

August 28, 2013

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TOPEKA — Gov. Sam Brownback joined hands Wednesday with a Topeka pastor to ring a silver bell to mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Brownback and the Rev. Gordon Glenn of Topeka's St. John AME Church closed a ceremony on the steps of the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site. It was one of more than 300 locations around the country where bells were rung to commemorate the August 1963 march in the nation's capital.

The Republican governor said King was a prophet but didn't live to see his dream or words come true. King was assassinated in April 1968, five years after the historic speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

"They will come true," Brownback said. "We are on the path for them to come true."

Dele Adegbore, a sophomore at Topeka High School, delivered King's speech in near 100-degree heat to a crowd of about 75 that included a drum line and choir. The 15-year-old said he practiced giving the speech for three weeks.

"It was an extraordinary experience," Adegbore said. "The most important part of the speech is the message."

Brownback said the Brown v. Board site was fitting because it represented the start of where segregation ended and civil rights began. The historic site is dedicated to the landmark 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling declaring segregated schools unconstitutional.

"This place is sacred," the governor said.

Comments

Randall Uhrich 1 year, 3 months ago

The height of hypocrisy. The man truly has no shame.

Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

do something on the 50th anniversary like stop suppressing minority to win elections.... did someone channel George Wallace?

smileydog 1 year, 3 months ago

On a national level, it was nice how the democrats didn't invite the nation's only black senator to the MLK rally in D.C. especially since he is from South 'Jim Crow' Carolina just because he is a Republican. Segregation at its finest.

tomatogrower 1 year, 3 months ago

Last I heard is that anyone could attend. Why didn't he go?

smileydog 1 year, 3 months ago

Too many celebrities giving speeches was more important? You tell me. He wasn't invited to speak. Segregation. Hypocrisy.

gatekeeper 1 year, 3 months ago

I would say he probably wasn't invited to speak (he was more than welcome to attend, as was EVERYONE in the country), because he and his party are doing their best to reverse the gains made by the civil rights movement. Do you know what that march was about 50 years ago and the voting rights gained because of it? Now the repubs are trying to take away so many of these rights.

Also, he is unknown, just appointed and has no record of achievement. You want to talk about racist - having to invite someone to speak just because they're black?

Scott is doing nothing to further MLK's dream.

Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

history lesson......prior to 1948 the Democratic Party had the racists.....President Truman's Executive Order #9938 integrated the US Military and created the Dixiecrats....Jess Helms, Orville Faubus, Strom Thurmond, George Wallace, and on and on. This split the Democratic Party. At this time the GOP was the wealthy fatcat party. The US Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Acts finished the deal of kicking out the racist element of the Democratic Party. Alabama Governor George Wallace went Third Party courting the Archie Bunker vote and after his assassination attempt Richard M Nixon courted this voting block along with the evangelicals by the mid 1970's and voila, the Tea Party States Rights Southern Strategy GOP forgetting what it was like to be tarred and feathered in the 1870's in the Reconstruction Era South which is what happened to the Non Racist GOP after the US Civil War there. I love the amnesia I see exhibited in numerous blog sites about when we kicked the racists out and the gop took them in. Please know your history. My historical source is my ex grandfather who was a Dixiecrat on the Mississippi Gulf Coast who couldn't stop himself from saying racist things in my childhood. The truth hurts. stop ignoring it.

Lefty54 1 year, 3 months ago

Anyway, back to Governor Brownback. I sincerely hope he listened to every word of Dr. King's speech and will have a change of heart about some of his policies.

Frederic Gutknecht IV 1 year, 3 months ago

Brownie does not ring the bell. He only holds onto the string. LOOK at his inaction. It's disgusting.

Chris Golledge 1 year, 3 months ago

Since Brownback represents a party currently working to suppress the rights of a minority, homosexuals to be specific, I find it inappropriate that he pretends to support the idealogy of a man whose greatest wish was that people be judged by their character, not by the characteristics they were born with.

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