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Opinion

Opinion

Letter: Dog danger

November 20, 2012

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To the editor:

This is very important information. In reading that xylitol could be used as an alternative to fluoridated water, it seemed a perfect time to warn pet owners about the danger of xylitol to dogs. Unfortunately, we learned about this just days ago when our dog found and ingested a pack of gum (18 sticks) containing this substance. We called our vet and were told to bring her out immediately. We had no clue about this danger and feel so grateful that our dog survived. Although she’s OK at this time, we hope she makes a full recovery and no permanent damage was done.

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener found in some gums, candies, sweets and human toothpastes. Ingestion by dogs and ferrets can be fatal! Xylitol causes a rapid decrease in blood sugar, which can lead to insulin shock/hypoglycemia. It can lead to liver dysfunction and/or failure, seizures, weakness or coma. More information and side effects can be found on the Internet or by calling your veterinarian. Please pass this information on to anyone you know who has dogs.

Comments

oldmomxx 2 years ago

How about putting NOTHING in our water?

gr 2 years ago

Right on!

And let the same thing be said about those wanting to put fluoride, lead, or arsenic in our water supply for any supposed "health benefits" which has nothing to do with making the water supply safe. Next thing you know, someone will be wanting to add cabbage juice for all it's anti-cancer benefits.

Ken Lassman 2 years ago

Albert never suggested putting xylitol in our drinking water like fluoride. Instead he suggested taking fluoride out of the water in order to avoid possible unintended neurotoxic side-effects for children who get too much fluoride, and instead give them xylitol chewing gum or mints in order to get the beneficial effect of greatly reduced tooth decay. Now it seems that such a move would need to be coupled with an education campaign to protect dogs (and kids??) from eating too much gum and suffering the attendant side effects of too much xylitol. I'd like to also see if there might also be vulnerable populations of humans who would be at increased risk of having these side effects, such as the elderly, frail, sick, etc. Does anyone know?

Cant_have_it_both_ways 2 years ago

Thinking outloud.... Wonder if it would work on the neighborhood cat that likes contaminating my flower beds with its awful smell?

kuguardgrl13 2 years ago

A simple Google search shows no examples of cats reacting the same as dogs. Tough luck. Try spraying the flowers with water and lemon juice. Cats hate the smell and taste of citrus. Otherwise take the cat to the shelter to get fixed.

gr 2 years ago

I'm not sure why using Google is necessary. Maybe that's why I got different results using a different search engine?

"There are several different over-the-counter pain medications that have been recommended for use in dogs as well as humans, including acetaminophen, or Tylenol; aspirin; and Ibuprofen, such as Advil or Motrin. Each of these products contains different active ingredients and affects the dog in different ways. According to Caroline Tanaka, DVM, all three are acceptable medications to administer to dogs,"

"Most mammal species can excrete acetaminophen (the ingredient in Tylenol) but cats can’t. In cats, it breaks down blood cells, causing anemia and death."

"While a dog can tolerate a little bit of Tylenol, this is not true of a cat. "

" Acetaminophen should never be given to cats. It can result in fatal blood and liver disorders. Care must be taken when this drug is given to dogs."

"There is no safe dose of acetaminophen for cats."

So wish the best of luck to the one treating the cat for migraines! It should solve them.

Ron Holzwarth 2 years ago

Being an on and off aquarist over many years, I've sure noticed a lot of changes in the city tap water!

I started with goldfish in a goldfish bowl. In the 1960s, you could change the water in your goldfish bowl by putting it in the sink under the tap, and running cold tap water into the bowl. You could leave it running that way as long as you wanted, the goldfish loved swimming in the swift, cold current as the water flowed out over the top.

I got back into the hobby in the 1980s, and things had changed, with chlorine. I didn't want to use the chlorine removing chemicals, so I let the water set for a full week, and that was fine. My fish did wonderfully! The neon tetras proved it by spawning, and the angelfish made that a monthly event.

And now. Forget it! You can't just leave the water out for a week, you need to use the chemicals that are sold at the pet store. I use the chemicals, then let the water sit for at least a couple days before doing water changes. So, I'm doing OK with my aquariums, the fish are doing well, but I miss the old days when all I needed was tap water.

But now I wonder, how did we survive for all those years while we were drinking fresh clean water straight from the tap?

bearded_gnome 2 years ago

^^And now. Forget it! You can't just leave the water out for a week, you need to use the chemicals that are sold at the pet store. I use the chemicals, then let the water sit for at least a couple days before doing water changes. So, I'm doing OK with my aquariums, the fish are doing well, but I miss the old days when all I needed was tap water.

---don't drink the water!

bearded_gnome 2 years ago

Dogs are so very special and deserve every particular concern we can give them.

they also deserve our time. and you know, we sure do benefit from our contact with them. we exercise more with them.
our blood pressures go down. we're not so lonely. they gve us laughter and support.

with training to show them the way, now they're helping PTSD suffering veterans avoid suicide and live better lives. they guide the blind. dogs are great.

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