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Opinion

Opinion

Letter: Dog danger

November 20, 2012

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To the editor:

This is very important information. In reading that xylitol could be used as an alternative to fluoridated water, it seemed a perfect time to warn pet owners about the danger of xylitol to dogs. Unfortunately, we learned about this just days ago when our dog found and ingested a pack of gum (18 sticks) containing this substance. We called our vet and were told to bring her out immediately. We had no clue about this danger and feel so grateful that our dog survived. Although she’s OK at this time, we hope she makes a full recovery and no permanent damage was done.

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener found in some gums, candies, sweets and human toothpastes. Ingestion by dogs and ferrets can be fatal! Xylitol causes a rapid decrease in blood sugar, which can lead to insulin shock/hypoglycemia. It can lead to liver dysfunction and/or failure, seizures, weakness or coma. More information and side effects can be found on the Internet or by calling your veterinarian. Please pass this information on to anyone you know who has dogs.

Comments

bearded_gnome 1 year, 4 months ago

Dogs are so very special and deserve every particular concern we can give them.

they also deserve our time. and you know, we sure do benefit from our contact with them. we exercise more with them.
our blood pressures go down. we're not so lonely. they gve us laughter and support.

with training to show them the way, now they're helping PTSD suffering veterans avoid suicide and live better lives. they guide the blind. dogs are great.

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bearded_gnome 1 year, 4 months ago

^^And now. Forget it! You can't just leave the water out for a week, you need to use the chemicals that are sold at the pet store. I use the chemicals, then let the water sit for at least a couple days before doing water changes. So, I'm doing OK with my aquariums, the fish are doing well, but I miss the old days when all I needed was tap water.

---don't drink the water!

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Ron Holzwarth 1 year, 5 months ago

Being an on and off aquarist over many years, I've sure noticed a lot of changes in the city tap water!

I started with goldfish in a goldfish bowl. In the 1960s, you could change the water in your goldfish bowl by putting it in the sink under the tap, and running cold tap water into the bowl. You could leave it running that way as long as you wanted, the goldfish loved swimming in the swift, cold current as the water flowed out over the top.

I got back into the hobby in the 1980s, and things had changed, with chlorine. I didn't want to use the chlorine removing chemicals, so I let the water set for a full week, and that was fine. My fish did wonderfully! The neon tetras proved it by spawning, and the angelfish made that a monthly event.

And now. Forget it! You can't just leave the water out for a week, you need to use the chemicals that are sold at the pet store. I use the chemicals, then let the water sit for at least a couple days before doing water changes. So, I'm doing OK with my aquariums, the fish are doing well, but I miss the old days when all I needed was tap water.

But now I wonder, how did we survive for all those years while we were drinking fresh clean water straight from the tap?

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Cant_have_it_both_ways 1 year, 5 months ago

Thinking outloud.... Wonder if it would work on the neighborhood cat that likes contaminating my flower beds with its awful smell?

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none2 1 year, 5 months ago

I think this LTE from Karen Wiley is a great public service letter as many of us might not have known about this side effect to dogs otherwise.

I hope that Albert W. Burgstahler who wrote the LTE for 16-Nov will reconsider his proposal to put this chemical in our drinking water. Even if I were a parent, I could not in good conscience ever support such an additive in water that killed dogs just so children could avoid cavities. If it can be that toxic to dogs, I wonder if they have done an exhaustive study on other animal species. If anybody has ever dealt with a human or animal with severe insulin shock/hypoglycemia, it is not a pleasant experience.

This wiki on this chemical has a section on the affect on dogs near the bottom:

While it is obvious that there are many beneficial properties from this chemical for individuals under the right circumstances, it should never be put in our public drinking water. Rather, let the individuals who want or need it, use it in their own households.

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oldmomxx 1 year, 5 months ago

How about putting NOTHING in our water?

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