Advertisement

Archive for Monday, November 23, 2009

Thousands of strange creatures found deep in ocean

November 23, 2009

Advertisement

a transparent sea cucumber, creeping forward on its many tentacles while sweeping detritus-rich sediment into its mouth, is one of thousands of new deep-sea creatures recently discovered.

a transparent sea cucumber, creeping forward on its many tentacles while sweeping detritus-rich sediment into its mouth, is one of thousands of new deep-sea creatures recently discovered.

— The creatures living in the depths of the ocean are as weird and outlandish as the creations in a Dr. Seuss book: tentacled transparent sea cucumbers, primitive “dumbos” that flap ear-like fins, and tubeworms that feed on oil deposits.

A report released Sunday recorded 17,650 species living below 656 feet, the point where sunlight ceases. The findings were the latest update on a 10-year census of marine life.

“Parts of the deep sea that we assumed were homogenous are actually quite complex,” said Robert S. Carney, an oceanographer at Louisiana State University and a lead researcher on the deep seas.

Thousands of marine species eke out an existence in the ocean’s pitch-black depths by feeding on the snowlike decaying matter that cascades down — even sunken whale bones. Oil and methane also are an energy source for the bottom-dwellers, the report said.

The researchers have found about 5,600 new species on top of the 230,000 known. They hope to add several thousand more by October 2010, when the census will be done.

The scientists say they could announce that a million or more species remain unknown. On land, biologists have catalogued about 1.5 million plants and animals.

They say they’ve found 5,722 species living in the extreme ocean depths, waters deeper than 3,280 feet.

“The deep sea was considered a desert until not so long ago; it’s quite amazing to have documented close to 20,000 forms of life in a zone that was thought to be barren,” said Jesse Ausubel with the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, a sponsor of the census.

More than 40 new species of coral were documented on deep-sea mountains, along with cities of brittlestars and anemone gardens. Nearly 500 new species ranging from single-celled creatures to large squid were charted in the abyssal plains and basins.

Also of importance were the 170 new species that get their energy from chemicals spewing from ocean-bottom vents and seeps. Among them was a family of “yeti crabs,” which have silky, hairlike filaments on the legs.

More than 2,000 scientists from 80 countries are working to catalog the oceans’ species.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.