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Archive for Wednesday, July 8, 2009

They come, they build, they ride off: Cyclists lend hands to Habitat house

Bike and Build worker Colin King, Richmond, Virginia, measures the framework of the roof Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at the build site of a Habitat for Humanity home at 1612 15th Street, for the Mendoza family of Lawrence. The workers, who are traveling by bicycle across the country to assist with such projects like Habitat for Humanity, spent Monday and Tuesday helping with the home's construction and will begin riding to Manhattan, Kan. on Wednesday to assist with another project. The group began its cross-country tour on June 6 in Providence, Rhode Island and expect to finish on Aug. 13 in San Francisco.

Bike and Build worker Colin King, Richmond, Virginia, measures the framework of the roof Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at the build site of a Habitat for Humanity home at 1612 15th Street, for the Mendoza family of Lawrence. The workers, who are traveling by bicycle across the country to assist with such projects like Habitat for Humanity, spent Monday and Tuesday helping with the home's construction and will begin riding to Manhattan, Kan. on Wednesday to assist with another project. The group began its cross-country tour on June 6 in Providence, Rhode Island and expect to finish on Aug. 13 in San Francisco.

July 8, 2009

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Bike and Build rolls through Lawrence

Habitat's Bike and Build program is halfway through its 2000 mile trek but stopped in Lawrence to construct a new home. Enlarge video

They traveled almost 2,000 miles to get here, but they didn’t rest when they reached Lawrence.

The 32 members of the Bike and Build crew spent Monday and Tuesday working on Habitat for Humanity’s latest project, in east Lawrence.

“Bike and Build is a nonprofit that runs eight routes across the country to fundraise for and spread awareness about affordable housing,” explained trip leader Kate Geronemus.

The Habitat home for the Mendoza family, on East 15th Street, was slated to be finished at the end of June, but monetary difficulties have pushed the deadline to August. Tammy Mendoza said having the cyclists to help move along the construction was very much appreciated.

“They’re doing a great job. They’re all a bunch of hard workers,” Mendoza said.

Habitat construction coordinator Mark Brooks echoed that sentiment about the crew’s work ethic.

“They catch right on to everything, and they rode their bicycles across the country to get here, so learning how to operate small hand tools is pretty small potatoes,” he said.

Brooks thinks the work the cyclists are doing is equal in value to the actual home they are helping build.

“In my opinion, it’s as much benefit to the homeowners — which is truly significant. It benefits the people that work on the thing every bit as much,” Brooks said.

Bike and Build has put in work days with Lawrence’s Habitat for Humanity for the past five years. Their attitude about Lawrence might explain their willingness to return year after year.

“Tremendously generous, very welcoming and kind community. (There) also seems to be a lot of support for this kind of work, so that’s been really inspiring,” Geronemus said.

The team will leave early this morning for Manhattan. Their final destination is San Francisco.

Comments

HootyWho 4 years, 9 months ago

as a future habitat recipient, (my house will probably be built next year, or the next), i'm so grateful to this bunch of people. I'd hoped to be able to meet them, but i had to work

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labmonkey 4 years, 9 months ago

....okay, I channeled my inner waka there.

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labmonkey 4 years, 9 months ago

The cyclists built it. I bet some evil, earth-hating car driver tried to burn it down. Bicycle riders love the earth, and they are humble. They are the humblest most humble people on earth and are more humble than you (especially the spandex-wearing ones), you earth-hating polluting car driver.

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ScottyMac 4 years, 9 months ago

The caption under the photo says the home will be "given" to the Mendoza family. This is not correct. Habitat does not "give" away houses. They sell houses to their partner families who are required to pay a twenty to thirty year mortgage. In addition, each adult member of the household is required to put in hundreds of hours of hard work ("sweat equity") on not only their new home, but also on the homes of at least two other families.

The homes are affordable, but they certainly are not free.

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Leslie Swearingen 4 years, 9 months ago

Waka this is about helping others in way that truly benefits them. This goes way beyond simply mouthing words about the homeless, this is putting up a dwelling that will come a home. The people who live there will have pride in their home and in themselves. They will grow as a family.

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waka1 4 years, 9 months ago

They had better stay on the sidewalks, bicycles do not belong on the roads with cars.

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