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Archive for Friday, February 10, 2006

Kidnapped American journalist pleads for help on video

February 10, 2006

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— Kidnapped American journalist Jill Carroll appeared in a video aired Thursday on a private Kuwaiti TV station, appealing in a calm, composed voice for her supporters to do whatever it takes to win her release "as quickly as possible."

Carroll, wearing traditional Arab attire, said the date was Feb. 2, nearly a month after she was seized in Baghdad by armed men who killed her Iraqi translator.

She was shown sitting on a chair in front of a wall with a large floral design.

The 28-year-old freelance reporter for The Christian Science Monitor said she had sent one letter and was sending another to "prove I am with the mujahedeen."

"I sent you a letter written by my hand, but you wanted more evidence," she said. "I am here. I am fine. Please just do whatever they want, give them whatever they want as quickly as possible. There is very short time. Please do it fast. That's all."

The 22-second video was carried by Al Rai TV, a private Kuwaiti channel, and included audio, unlike two previous videos of Carroll that were broadcast by Al-Jazeera television.

The tape was delivered earlier Thursday to Al Rai's Baghdad office and was aired in its entirety, Hani al-Srougi, an editor at the station's headquarters in Kuwait, told The Associated Press. It was accompanied by a letter written by Carroll.

The newscaster said on the air that the station would hand the letter over to authorities, but would not disclose the letter's content.

Tania Anderson, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait, said: "I assume that Al Rai has given the material they received to the Kuwaiti authorities, who I am confident will take the appropriate action at the earliest possible time. The embassy customarily works closely with our contacts with the Kuwaiti government and will seek their cooperation on this matter as well."

The Christian Science Monitor said it was seeking more information about the letter.

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