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Archive for Sunday, March 28, 2004

All stories

Poet’s showcase
March 28, 2004
Briefly
March 28, 2004
¢ Police capture suspect in family’s deaths ¢ U.N. officials return for inspections ¢ Gunfire kills 7-year-old ¢ Earthquake hits Tibet; no injuries reported
Book briefs
March 28, 2004
¢ Author’s club launches 2004 literary contest ¢ Baldwin poet to sign books, discuss hospice and dying
In Wichita, edginess sets in
News of infamous BTK strangler’s resurgence causing worries
March 28, 2004
For some, the memories had only recently faded, the gnawing dread that made them check behind their doors when they came home at night, or look for broken windows before they entered.
Finger-pointing marks 9-11 hearings
March 28, 2004
Al-Qaida’s attack on America on Sept. 11, 2001, will forever be a national tragedy and a moment of history shifting its gears irrevocably. But 9-11 is becoming something else as well: a consumable product to be packaged and merchandised for use by American politicians, bureaucrats, celebrity-mongers, journalists and others.
The good old days when we all ate carbs
March 28, 2004
I probably shouldn’t admit this to you younger readers, but when my generation was your age, we did some pretty stupid things. I’m talking about taking CRAZY risks. We drank water right from the tap. We used aspirin bottles that you could actually open with your bare hands.
Principled stand
Being willing to stand up for what you believe is a laudable quality for a public official.
March 28, 2004
Whether or not you agree with his stand, there is reason to admire a state legislator willing to stand on principle. That’s what state Sen. David Adkins, R-Leawood, did Thursday when he held the Senate floor for more than four hours to argue against a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage in Kansas.
Visitor vexed
March 28, 2004
Lifetime gift
March 28, 2004
Gun sanity
March 28, 2004
Facts back ban
March 28, 2004
Former KU player to lead eco-devo team
Maddox seeks debate on creation of jobs
March 28, 2004
The game has changed for Mike Maddox. Maddox, a member of Kansas University’s 1988 national championship basketball team, is no longer a player. But he still talks about game plans and the competition.
K.C. company joins low-carb craze
Pasta maker hoping to stir up sales
March 28, 2004
Reverse mortgages can be saving grace for seniors
March 28, 2004
I’ve always loved the quote from British novelist Angela Carter, who wrote: “Home is where your heart is.” But I have another twist on that sentiment. Today, our homes aren’t just where our hearts are. Our homes are where our money is.
Briefcase
March 28, 2004
¢ Steps that hurt credit ¢ Technology can identify ‘friendly’ ground targets ¢ Motley Fool: Name that company
Business briefs
March 28, 2004
The Motley Fool
March 28, 2004
¢ Last week’s answer ¢ When to sell ¢ A slick profit ¢ Bankruptcy 101
Recognizing pain proves challenging for veterinarians
March 28, 2004
Nothing seems to embrace the philosophy and core values of veterinary medicine more than this prayer from Albert Schweitzer: “Hear our humble prayer, O God, for our friends the animals who are suffering … and for those who deal with them we ask a heart of compassion and gentle hands and kindly words. Make ourselves to be true friends to animals and so to share the blessings of the Merciful.” Yet, we might ask ourselves, “Do animals suffer? Do they feel pain like we humans do?”
Pet owners should try natural remedies to cure common ills
March 28, 2004
If you’ve been following along for the past few weeks, you know we are halfway in our eight-week plan for a healthy pet. We’ve discussed getting an initial evaluation to determine your pet’s health status, the importance of choosing the proper diet, diagnosing and treating parasites, and the importance of nutritional supplements.
Cabin fervor
Mountain residents fall in love with log retreat
March 28, 2004
High above Nederland, Colo., on Hurricane Hill, furious winds bend branches of trees and send tumbleweeds rolling across fields. Snow and ice blanket every surface. But inside a 3,600-square-foot log home, all is calm. The huge amber-colored logs are tightly braided; nothing groans under the stress. No windows rattle. No cold air sneaks through.
Lawn-care program outlined
March 28, 2004
Spring bulbs are blooming, trees are budding and the grass has started to turn green. With everything returning to life, it’s time to “do” gardening instead of “think” gardening. The longer days and mild temperatures mean cool-season lawn grasses (Kentucky bluegrass, fescue and ryegrass) need attention. With proper timing and technique, your lawn could become the envy of the neighborhood.
World briefs
March 28, 2004
¢ Arab leaders delay start of summit ¢ Jehovah’s Witnesses banned from capital ¢ Police link fingerprints to train bomb suspects ¢ Nobel peace laureate survives party’s ballot
Finding a routine
Ramping can help the out-of-shape beginner move into exercising
March 28, 2004
A problem out-of-shape beginners discover when they start exercising is that many programs are too complicated or intense. They often give up before they get a good start.
Horoscope
March 28, 2004
Rhythms of change
African dance troupe sees itself as model for peace
March 28, 2004
In the year since Kansas University’s inaugural World Music and Cultural Diversity Concert, more than 580 U.S. service members and untold numbers of Iraqi civilians have died in the war with Iraq. Palestinians and Israelis continue to aim rockets at one another. And just weeks ago, 192 people perished when bombs ripped through a commuter train in Madrid, Spain. To put it mildly, peace is not at work in the world.
Ceramics show proves good things fit in small packages
March 28, 2004
To ceramic artists the world over, the term “cone box” means something. So when you mention the “Orton International Cone Box Show,” they’re either familiar with the well-known biennial exhibition at Baker University or they understand it probably has something to do with size.
Folklorist Alan Lomax’s trove goes to library
Life’s work includes 5,000 hours of sound recordings and 400,000 feet of movie film
March 28, 2004
The lifework of the late legendary American folklorist Alan Lomax has been acquired by the American Folklife Center in the Library of Congress.
Jayhawks hoping to shed Jackets
KU’s goal: take Self to Final Four
March 28, 2004
Bill Self’s first two trips to the Elite Eight ended in heartbreak. “As a young guy, I was absolutely crushed when it didn’t happen,” said Self, Kansas University’s first-year head coach, whose Tulsa team lost to North Carolina, 59-55, in 2000 in Austin, Texas, and whose Illinois squad fell to Arizona, 87-81, in 2001 in San Antonio.
Woodling: Kansas closing in on title destiny
March 28, 2004
Down by the Mississippi River under the Gateway Arch sits the Jefferson Expansion National Memorial — arguably the most insipidly named national monument in the nation. The site should be called the How the West Was Won National Monument. That’s what it’s all about. The museum depicts, through an assortment of exhibits, how manifest destiny forged the United States into the greatest nation in the world.
KU drops twinbill to Baylor
March 28, 2004
Kansas University’s softball squad dropped its Big 12 Conference-opening series against No. 21 Baylor, falling 2-0 and 2-0 to the Bears on Saturday at Getterman Stadium.
Lions pound Pembroke
March 28, 2004
Lawrence High built a big early lead and cruised to a 17-5 victory over Kansas City Pembroke Hill on Saturday in its baseball season-opener.
Canadians common at KU race
March 28, 2004
Kansas University rowers Kristy Hainer and Alexis Boston looked out of place in blue Jayhawk garb Saturday morning, surrounded by a herd of burnt-orange-wearing Longhorns.
Jayhawk briefs
March 28, 2004
¢ KU baseball at NU postponed until today ¢ KU golf fifth
Baylor coach to face mentor in Summitt
March 28, 2004
Kim Mulkey-Robertson remembers when she was a player and Pat Summitt stood by her and comforted her when she was about to become a mother.
Tech discovers ways to survive
Elder won’t start, but expected to play against KU
March 28, 2004
Perhaps nothing says more about Georgia Tech than the fact the Yellow Jackets survived the NCAA Sweet 16 without their leading scorer. B.J. Elder, a 6-foot-4 junior guard averaging 15.8 points a game, logged a mere three minutes on the floor after rolling an ankle Friday night, yet Tech clipped Nevada, 72-67, in the Edward Jones Dome.
Techsters have tough task in top-ranked Blue Devils
March 28, 2004
Duke brings impressive credentials into the Mideast Regional. Louisiana Tech has some impressive ones, too.
Cowboys marching on
Lucas drains three in closing seconds of 64-62 win
March 28, 2004
The kid with the famous NBA name showed college basketball’s player of the year how to do it. John Lucas hit a three-pointer with 6.9 seconds left, Jameer Nelson missed right before the buzzer and Oklahoma State held off Saint Joseph’s 64-62 in a thriller Saturday night for a trip to the Final Four.
UConn clubs Alabama, 87-71
Gordon pours in 36 points as Huskies roll
March 28, 2004
The NCAA Tournament is bringing out the best in Connecticut, and the Huskies at their best are breathtaking. Ben Gordon scored 36 points — one shy of his career high — and Rashad Anderson added a career-best 28 in the Huskies’ 87-71 romp over Alabama on Saturday in the Phoenix Regional final.
Tigers topple Longhorns
No. 1 seed Texas trounced by LSU, 71-55; UConn to face Penn St.
March 28, 2004
Seimone Augustus played so hard, she worked up a cramp in her neck and missed LSU’s postgame interviews.
Sixers make move without Iverson
March 28, 2004
The Philadelphia 76ers just might be a better team without Allen Iverson. In their last eight games minus the injured Iverson, the Sixers are 7-1 and have moved back into the playoff race in the Eastern Conference. The All-Star guard is sidelined because of a sore right knee, an injury that might not have kept him out of the lineup in past years.
K.C. believes; now it’s showtime
Upgraded squad needs to build on 2003 momentum
March 28, 2004
A breakthrough by promising young pitchers, a healthy Juan Gonzalez and one or two lucky bounces could halt Kansas City’s 19-year postseason drought. The Royals, in Tony Pena’s second full season at the helm, also could melt right back into the small-market pack and return to their familiar losing ways.
Royals stop Unit, D’Backs
March 28, 2004
Aaron Guiel and Carlos Beltran each had run-scoring hits off Randy Johnson, lifting the Kansas City Royals to a 6-2 win Saturday over the Arizona Diamondbacks.
New coach makes lasting impressions
Virginia Tech AD affirms Perkins’ hire: Henrickson deserves job as Jayhawk leader
March 28, 2004
Kansas University athletic director Lew Perkins spent 13 years as AD at Connecticut in the Big East Conference, so he was able to watch Bonnie Henrickson build her Virginia Tech women’s basketball program into a conference contender. Perkins must have liked what he saw.
Tech’s Bynum familiar with KU
Former Arizona guard faced Jayhawks in 2001
March 28, 2004
Will Bynum remembers Kansas University. He’s the only one on Georgia Tech’s roster who does.
Graves takes shot at Williams
March 28, 2004
Jeff Graves, who with his puffy upper lip looked like a boxer the day after a fight, took an oral jab at his former coach on Saturday at Edward Jones Dome. “As far as the handling of me, coach (Bill) Self gave me a chance. As far as coach (Roy) Williams, he didn’t really give me a chance. He always got me in the doghouse,” said Graves, who needed seven stitches to close a cut on his lip, courtesy of an elbow from UAB’s Marques Lewis in the Jayhawks’ 100-74 win over the Blazers on Friday night.
NCAA success wins Self fans
March 28, 2004
Brooke Waldron won’t ever forget huddling with classmates in the student pavilion at KU Medical Center, watching as beloved coach Roy Williams’ teary eyes and farewell words cut them to the bone during a televised introductory press conference in Chapel Hill, N.C. But today, hanging out with family and gearing up for today’s NCAA regional final in St. Louis, Waldron figures that her team not only is in good hands but also stands a better chance of winning it all now that Williams’ 15-year stay in Lawrence is done.
Late-term abortion ban to face court tests
Three cases to begin Monday
March 28, 2004
A historic legal battle over abortion begins in courtrooms coast to coast Monday as three federal judges take up requests to derail the first substantial congressional limitation on abortion since the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade decision.
Popular programs face school budget ax
March 28, 2004
Cammie Braden has seen positive changes in her eighth-grade son since he started playing trumpet two years ago. He is more socially active, enjoys school more and is getting better grades. Braden said she wants her fourth-grade son to have the same opportunities when he hits sixth grade. But that might not be possible. The sixth-grade band and orchestra program is one of many programs the Lawrence school board will consider eliminating during its meeting Monday.
Smart-growth’ majority marks year in charge
March 28, 2004
Smart growth or no growth? One year ago this week, the Progressive Lawrence Campaign swept three candidates onto the five-member Lawrence City Commission with the promise of applying “smart-growth” principles to city issues. But critics derided the candidates — Commissioners Boog Highberger, Mike Rundle and David Schauner — as “no-growth” partisans. Who was right?
Wandering county residents get direction
$16,000 in new signs intended to send public to appropriate offices
March 28, 2004
It might be the most-asked question in Douglas County’s halls of justice — right up there with “Do you solemnly swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth?” The question is, “Where do I go to pay this speeding ticket?”
School-finance reforms newest Brown legacy
March 28, 2004
Fifty years ago, the legal issue facing school systems in Kansas and elsewhere was whether educating black and white students separately was constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court, in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, left no doubt: “Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” Equality is still at the heart of legal challenges to public school systems, but the issue today goes beyond school buildings to what goes on inside them.
Youths learn basketball from former KU player
Jeff Boschee teaches clinic at Holcom Park
March 28, 2004
Saturday was about as good as it gets for Amanda Hadl. The 11-year-old Lawrence girl was one of about 20 girls who spent two hours playing basketball under direction of former Kansas University standout Jeff Boschee.
City briefs
March 28, 2004
¢ Wet weather cools down above-average highs ¢ Rider taken to hospital after motorcycle wreck ¢ Vietnam vet, author to speak at museum ¢ Pump Patrol seeks deals
Nervous fans maintain game-day rituals
March 28, 2004
To Kansas University basketball fans, whether the Jayhawks win or lose depends on how they watch the game. Whether it is wearing a favorite shirt or getting the same seat at a sports bar, fans stick to their game-day rituals, hoping for a victory.
Anti-Semitism growing throughout Europe
March 28, 2004
The crimes seem lifted from a Nazi-era scrapbook: a rabbi beaten with a beer bottle, swastikas painted over Stars of David, a gasoline bomb hurled at a synagogue. But they appear in police blotters across Europe today, disturbing omens of new strains of anti-Semitism.
Women-owned businesses struggle to attract venture capital, study finds
March 28, 2004
Women-owned businesses only get about 4 percent to 9 percent of available venture capital, despite women leading 28 percent of U.S. businesses in 2002, according to a new study.
MU proposes 7.5% increase in tuition rates
Extra money would go toward 2 percent faculty salary increases
March 28, 2004
The University of Missouri on Friday announced plans to increase tuition 7.5 percent for undergraduate and graduate students attending its four campuses in what was characterized as an “inflationary increase.”
On the record
March 28, 2004
Tornado hits S.W. Kansas
Twister causes damage to buildings near Kinsley
March 28, 2004
A tornado Saturday in southwestern Kansas caused damage along a 10-mile stretch.
WMD claims yield new intelligence woes
Report: Discredited Iraqi defector was key source for U.S.
March 28, 2004
The Bush administration’s prewar claims that Saddam Hussein had built a fleet of trucks and railroad cars to produce anthrax and other deadly germs were based chiefly on information from a now-discredited Iraqi defector code-named “Curveball,” according to current and former intelligence officials.
Lawrence commuter report
March 28, 2004
Attorneys reach plea in hoax case involving Topekan
March 28, 2004
The attorney for a Kansas woman accused of impersonating a couple’s long-missing daughter has reached a plea agreement with the Boone County prosecutor, although the woman has not yet accepted the deal.
Board to discuss budget cuts
Agenda highlights ¢ 7 p.m. Monday ¢ 110 McDonald Drive
March 28, 2004
School board members will hear a report on the 2004-2005 budget and discuss possible additions and cuts.
Questions emerge about tipster in sniper case
March 28, 2004
The story was compelling: An eagle-eyed tipster spotted the man wanted in a deadly string of Ohio sniper shootings reading a newspaper story about himself in a Las Vegas casino, gathered a trail of evidence and turned him in to police.
Senate gives its approval to biosciences initiative
Version of bill includes restrictions on stem-cell research
March 28, 2004
As a bill aimed at creating a new biosciences industry in Kansas moves closer to her desk, Gov. Kathleen Sebelius is criticizing a portion restricting research involving fetal tissue or stem cells.
U.S., allies keeping lid on anti-terror intelligence
March 28, 2004
More than two years after the Bush administration won pledges of support from dozens of countries eager to join the war on terrorism, Washington and its allies still keep a jealous hold on intelligence, snarling the information sharing needed to shut down al-Qaida.
N.C. school restricts book featuring gay prince
March 28, 2004
A children’s book about a prince whose true love turns out to be another prince will be available only to adults in an elementary school’s library, a committee has decided.
Jayhawks manage hotel woes
March 28, 2004
J.R. Giddens and Jeremy Case returned from practice Saturday afternoon and tried to get into their room at the Marriott Pavilion Hotel in downtown St. Louis. One problem: Their card keys didn’t work.
Judge trying to avoid mistrial in Tyco case
March 28, 2004
In the Middle Ages, it is said, a sheriff would lock deliberating jurors in a room without food or water until they reached a verdict.
At least 21 killed in Iraq in past two days
March 28, 2004
Rebel rockets slammed into a government building in the northern city of Mosul on Saturday, killing two civilians and wounding 14 others. An explosion rocked central Baghdad in a roadside bomb attack on a convoy, wounding five Iraqis.
Analysis: Candidates struggle to find election ‘vision’
March 28, 2004
Democrats fear John Kerry is tracing the errant path of Al Gore, who lost focus on a forward-looking vision for America because he set his sights too low — on the daily tactics of the 2000 campaign.
Clarke known as abrasive but effective
Clarke known as abrasive but effective
March 28, 2004
Richard Clarke, the man who threw elbows and banged heads together to get things done under four American presidents, is the last person friends and colleagues expected to go public.
Weighing your digital options
March 28, 2004
If you’re a regular reader of Behind the Lens, you probably have an interest in the changing technology of cameras, as well as how to take photographs. You may be considering switching from film to digital and wrestling with what kind of camera would best fit your needs.
Concert mingles light, dark sides of dance
March 28, 2004
The light and dark sides of dance will mingle next weekend at the Lawrence Arts Center when the Prairie Wind Dancers present an Evening of New Works.
Trench coats make fashion statement
March 28, 2004
The trench coat is one of the season’s “must-have” items, marking a rare alignment between fashion stars and grounded shoppers.
Garciaparra likely to miss opener
March 28, 2004
The Boston Red Sox probably will start the season without shortstop Nomar Garciaparra, who is expected to miss opening day because of inflammation in his right Achilles’ tendon.
Scott surges into lead at TPC
Lickliter, Sutherland two shots back in second place
March 28, 2004
Three straight birdies gave Adam Scott the lead in The Players Championship. No mistakes on the treacherous back nine at Sawgrass kept him there. All that remains is to hold off a world-class collection of players on one of golf’s most frightening courses.
A tale of two heroes
Darwin’s captain overshadowed by naturalist’s fame
March 28, 2004
“Evolution’s Captain” (HarperCollins, $24.95) is Peter Nichols’ fourth book with a maritime theme and is further evidence of his skill as a historian, researcher and elegant writer.
Lawrence author masters myth
March 28, 2004
The idea of a protagonist going through a rite of passage is probably the oldest story line in human history. Whether it is an African boy losing his virginity, or an American girl moving out of her parents’ house, a major change in one person’s life has always been a ubiquitous theme in literature.
What are you reading?
March 28, 2004
Exhibit displays never-before-seen prints
Student mined Spencer Museum for rare morsels from etching revival
March 28, 2004
When Reed Anderson started rummaging through the print room at the Spencer Museum of Art in the fall of 2002, he didn’t think he would find a new life passion. But he did.
Martin: Preserving water means preserving our essence
March 28, 2004
The Earth’s surface is 70 percent water. But it’s hidden water that matters most to people who live on the Great Plains. Between 1940 and 2000, Texas and Kansas headed a list of eight states that tap into this hidden water, which is found in the sand and gravel deposits of the Ogallala Aquifer.
Modern-looking porcelains popular with collectors
March 28, 2004
Taiwan’s president to meet with opponents
March 28, 2004
Hours after nearly 500,000 opposition supporters protested outside his offices in central Taipei, President Chen Shui-bian late Saturday agreed to meet his two main political rivals for talks in what was viewed as a major step toward resolving Taiwan’s postelection crisis.
Poetry series sings same song, new verses
March 28, 2004
Kansas City Star books editor John Mark Eberhart observed last January that poetry — that oft-misunderstood, oft-avoided genre of bards, madmen and word nerds — was in the midst of a renaissance. (Audio clips)
Cavs’ James drops 41 points
March 28, 2004
The Chosen One picked the perfect night to play the best game of his career. LeBron James scored a career-high 41 points and lifted the Cleveland Cavaliers out of a four-game losing streak.
Kerry blasts Bush’s response to critics
Democrat visits K.C., says president conducts ‘character assassination’
March 28, 2004
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., on Saturday accused President Bush of resorting to “character assassination” to discredit critics of the White House’s anti-terrorism strategy and new Medicare law.
Historical train engineers excitement
Massive steam locomotive stirs crowds, memories one town at a time
March 28, 2004
When Steve Lee drives by, cattle stampede, deer run for their lives, fish jump from the water, children grin and gape and grown-ups wave.
Prosecutor recommends indictment against Israel’s Sharon
Leader could be forced out at critical time
March 28, 2004
In a sharp escalation of a long-standing corruption scandal surrounding Ariel Sharon, the state prosecutor has recommended that the prime minister be indicted, Israeli media reported Saturday.
Pet post
March 28, 2004
People
March 28, 2004
¢ Siegfried, Roy plan comeback ¢ Nelson seeks presidential farm aid ¢ 007 is just a click away ¢ Taking grunge to New York
Japan’s healing concepts replenish the body and the soul
March 28, 2004
Walking in to the Kura Door Holistic Japanese Spa is like stepping into Japan. Japanese lanterns light the hallways, Japanese-themed artwork adorns the walls and antique Japanese furniture is peppered throughout the building. A Japanese garden grows in a small outdoor courtyard, and spa-goers can sit on mats in a traditional tea room.
Family briefs
March 28, 2004
¢ Spend less on batteries ¢ Barbie seeking best arts teacher in country ¢ Most fun towns listed
Area briefs
March 28, 2004
¢ Red Cross changes water safety programs ¢ University sets exams ¢ Lecompton plans kindergarten meeting ¢ State party leaders to talk at Washburn
Briefly
March 28, 2004
¢ French lawyer says he will defend Saddam Hussein ¢ NASA tests unmanned jet that could reach 5,000 mph ¢ President says elections delayed until September
Briefly
March 28, 2004
¢ Bill Gates competes in bridge tournament ¢ East Coast braces for onslaught of cicadas ¢ As gasoline prices rise, so do thefts at pump
Briefly
March 28, 2004
¢ Surf-music artist Jan Berry dies at 62 ¢ Supreme Court to hear harassment lawsuit ¢ Jehovah’s Witnesses meet on sexual abuse ¢ Episcopalians seek ways to keep church together
Mayer: KU greats elevated NCAA to top tourney
March 28, 2004
From the time basketball’s National Invitation Tournament debuted in 1938 it was doomed because of gambling influences in and around Madison Square Garden and the dedication of Kansas icons Phog Allen and Dutch Lonborg.
Style briefs
March 28, 2004
¢ Hair emergencies ¢ BCBG Max Azria’s new signature ¢ Whose nose knows?
Arts notes
March 28, 2004
¢ Bending the laws of art galleries ¢ Kansas University Organist takes second in national competition ¢ Scottish fiddler brings Highland taste to Lied ¢ Self-reflection turns into art for Tara Tonsor ¢ KU organist places second in national competition ¢ Objects in view may be different than they appear ¢ Exhibit offers rare glimpse at Kansas-Nebraska Act ¢ Eclectic singer-songwriter brings show to Lawrence ¢ Celebrated poet to visit Rockhurst University ¢ Open Call Dance Company offers class in Eudora ¢ Follow the yellow brick road
Senate needs South Carolinian’s voice
March 28, 2004
In every four-year cycle there are about 1 million American elections, most of which involve marginal differences between conventional candidates. This year’s South Carolina Senate contest is one that matters.
Blacks struggle to make themselves whole
March 28, 2004
Somehow, for black people, it always comes down to fractions. At the beginning, there was that unpleasantness about the Constitution counting us as three-fifths of a human being. More recently, fractions have been necessary to measure our progress toward equality.
Xavier up next for tourney-tested Duke
Blue Devils no strangers to regional finals, but Musketeers new kids on block
March 28, 2004
From a historical standpoint, this one looks like a slam dunk. The Duke Blue Devils have spent so much time at NCAA regional finals, they could be charged with loitering. And Xavier? The Musketeers never knew people played basketball at this time of year.
Throw-down showdown looms
Giddens, Muhammad dunk duel could be subplot
March 28, 2004
Georgia Tech’s Isma’il Muhammad says he’ll be the best dunker on the court today when the Yellow Jackets take on Kansas University in the St. Louis Regional final. KU’s J.R. Giddens doesn’t care.
Defense Department panel seeks changes to U.S. nuclear arsenal
March 28, 2004
A prestigious Defense Department panel has recommended major changes to the United States’ nuclear arsenal, saying the current plans to refurbish the existing weapons stockpile will not protect the nation from new threats from rogue states and terrorist groups.
Bookstore
March 28, 2004
Reality king expanding his empire
Survivor’ creator now cashing in on ‘Apprentice’
March 28, 2004
Every Friday morning when the Nielsen numbers come in for the previous night, Mark Burnett’s credentials as one of the most powerful creative forces in television grow stronger.