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Archive for Thursday, July 8, 2004

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Chance for thunderstorms continues through afternoon
July 8, 2004
(Updated Thursday at 1:18 p.m.) Thunderstorms have been building, but dying off throughout the morning in the Lawrence area. However, the chance remains for an isolated thunderstorm that could bring heavy rain through the afternoon, said Jennifer Schack, 6News meteorologist.
Briefly
July 8, 2004
¢ FDA to announce new rules on cattle feed ¢ Police beating probe widens ¢ Caribbean nations to send delegation to Haiti
Briefly
July 8, 2004
¢ ACLU sues for right of gay couples to marry ¢ Church groups lead relief trip to Cuba ¢ Clinton to release policy papers early ¢ Explosion at plant kills one employee
Liberal’s materialistic approach to politics
July 8, 2004
It has come to this: The crux of the political left’s complaint about Americans is that they are insufficiently materialistic. For a century, the left has largely failed to enact its agenda for redistributing wealth. What the left has achieved is a rich literature of disappointment, explaining the mystery, as the left sees it, of why most Americans are impervious to the left’s appeal.
Prostate cancer diagnosis improves
July 8, 2004
Scientists have found a way to predict which cases of prostate cancer will turn out to be the most serious — a tool that should help physicians decide when to take aggressive action against this generally slow-growing cancer of old age, according to researchers in a report released today.
Charges dismissed against ex-casino manager
July 8, 2004
A judge on Wednesday threw out two gambling-related charges filed against the general manager of a closed American Indian casino in downtown Kansas City, Kan. Ellis Enyart, 52, of Wyandotte, Okla., was charged with felony commercial gambling and a misdemeanor charge of possession of a gambling device after the state raided and closed the Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma’s 7th Street Casino on April 2.
Emergency officials head for training camp
July 8, 2004
Up to 80 high-ranking emergency officials are getting ready to go to camp. The officials from governments and agencies in Douglas County — police supervisors, fire chiefs, government administrators and elected officials — are cleared to enroll in a weeklong Integrated Emergency Management Course, at the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s training camp in Emmitsburg, Md.
Several trampled by bulls on first run of festival
July 8, 2004
Several people were trampled but not seriously hurt Wednesday as thousands took part in the first bull run of the San Fermin festival, dashing along the slippery cobblestone streets of this ancient city in northern Spain. Running ahead of bulls is life and I wanted to feel alive,” said Ray Sabbatini, 36, of Wisconsin, who suffers from multiple sclerosis and was accompanied by his friend Dennis Rodman, the retired National Basketball League star.
Family disputes claims that missing Marine free
July 8, 2004
The brother of a Marine who was reported captured in Iraq denied reports Wednesday that he had been released and contacted family members, but a U.S. official said there was reason to believe the corporal was in his native Lebanon. “I hope we hear from him, but so far, nothing,” his brother, Mohamad Hassoun, told The Associated Press.
Young pianists wow KU crowd
July 8, 2004
A half-hour before Hong Kong native Kuok-Wai Lio bellied up to a Steinway grand to play in the finals of the International Piano Competition on Wednesday, he rested in his Lied Center dressing room, a picture of composure.
Briefly
July 8, 2004
¢ Oil tycoon offers stocks to pay taxes ¢ Child psychologist admits abusing children ¢ Budget in the red for third straight year
Open GOP primary blocked
Judge: Party chairman ‘overstepped his bounds’
July 8, 2004
Unaffiliated voters will not be allowed to cast ballots in Kansas’ Republican primary on Aug. 3, following a judge’s decision Wednesday that the state party chairman “dangerously overstepped his bounds” by declaring it open.
Storms rock northern Kansas
Several counties report possible tornadoes; winds bowl over five semis on I-70
July 8, 2004
RSevere weather Wednesday night in northern Kansas brought reports of tornadoes and flooding, but authorities did not yet know the extent of the damage. The National Weather Service received several reports of possible tornadoes in Russell, Ellis, Barton and Mitchell counties, but many appeared to be in rural areas.
Watkins options
July 8, 2004
Viable options exist to expand the Watkins Community Museum at its current site. In recent weeks, there has been discussion about the future of the Watkins Community Museum of History, funding to keep the museum growing in excellence and how to improve the facility to accommodate a growing number of visitors and acquisitions.
Lawrence briefs
July 8, 2004
¢ Former resident pleads no contest to sex crime ¢ Check forger sentenced to prison for 26 months ¢ With 3 DUIs in past, driver considers plea
Camps trade dismissive barbs
July 8, 2004
President Bush on Wednesday curtly dismissed freshman Sen. John Edwards’ credentials to be vice president while Democratic challenger John Kerry and his running mate rallied voters in battleground states. “Dick Cheney can be president,” Bush declared, and Kerry suggested that was part of the problem.
Sideline
July 8, 2004
¢ Matsui, Abreu added ¢ Coach K supports Snyder ¢ Pacers sign Harrison
Drought concerns now just a memory in N.E. Kansas
Area lakes, rivers, streams near point of oversaturation compared with a year ago, weather watchers say
July 8, 2004
In the past year, northeast Kansas has gone from a period of drought that put streams and even a section of one area lake on the critical list to a period of plentiful moisture that has bordered on oversaturation. “Most of the ponds are up to the overflow tubes,” said Bill Wood, Kansas State University agricultural extension agent for Douglas County. “If there is even a hint of a stream, it is flowing.”
Salute! fund-raiser scheduled
July 8, 2004
The sixth-annual “Salute! — A Festival of Wine & Food,” a three-day fund-raiser for Cottonwood, Inc., will be today through Saturday. Cottonwood, 2801 W. 31st St., provides employment, residential and support services for people with developmental disabilities in Douglas and Jefferson counties.
Martinez, Red Sox roll past A’s
Boston earns first back-to-back wins since June 17-18 with easy 11-3 victory
July 8, 2004
Briefly
July 8, 2004
¢ Suspect in arson spree enters not-guilty plea ¢ Ottawa Co-op fire still under investigation ¢ D.A., suspect reach plea in ISU airplane invasion ¢ Manhole work to cause 6th Street traffic delays
Briefly
July 8, 2004
¢ Six go on trial in U.S.S. Cole bombing ¢ Health chief resigns over SARS response ¢ TV network silences independent program ¢ Suspected Tamil Tiger suicide bomber kills 4
Israel snubs envoys on peace plans
July 8, 2004
Israel snubbed a delegation of Mideast mediators that had come to discuss its planned withdrawal from the Gaza Strip, officials said Wednesday, further undermining efforts to promote an internationally backed peace plan for the region.
Horoscopes
July 8, 2004
Balancing liberty, security
July 8, 2004
Historians at the Sorbonne once fiercely disputed which of the French Revolution’s twists and turns represented the core moment of that upheaval and its voluminous aftermath. The storming of the Bastille, the Reign of Terror, Bonaparte’s coup d’etat and other moments each had their champions.
Winds of war may spur draft
July 8, 2004
The iconic recruiting poster of Uncle Sam, drawn by James Montgomery Flagg in 1916 and captioned “I Want You for the U.S. Army,” has had no greater vitality than in today’s terror-besieged world. American forces are stretched thin around the world. The United States has almost 700,000 soldiers and Marines on active duty, in South Korea, Afghanistan, the Balkans, Iraq and elsewhere.
African countries demand Sudan crack down on militias
July 8, 2004
The African Union demanded Wednesday that Sudan arrest and prosecute Arab militiamen accused of committing atrocities in western Sudan, but it said the violence in the Darfur region did not constitute genocide.
Appeals court hears school sales tax case
Johnson County funding challenged
July 8, 2004
An attorney for four Wyandotte County school districts told the state Court of Appeals on Wednesday that a Johnson County sales tax dedicated to education was unconstitutional and caused irreparable harm to students.
Nebraska governor approaches Texas in effort to settle nuclear waste dispute
July 8, 2004
Nebraska Gov. Mike Johanns has approached Texas officials about storing nuclear waste there to help Nebraska settle a lawsuit in which it has been ordered to pay $151 million. Kathy Walt, a spokeswoman for Texas Gov. Rick Perry, said Wednesday that Johanns broached the subject with Perry, but that it would be going too far to say the two sides were negotiating.
Holiday’s zero death toll could change
July 8, 2004
While preliminary information from the Kansas Highway Patrol showed no traffic fatalities over the Fourth of July weekend, there’s a possibility that one death in Wichita may be attributed to a traffic accident.
Baker bullish on endowment
Donations to university climb $3.88 million in rebounding year
July 8, 2004
The great faithfulness of Baker University friends and alumni is helping the university’s endowment rebound from multimillion-dollar losses. Gifts to the university during the past fiscal year — including royalties generated from the hymn “Great is Thy Faithfulness” — and a recovering economy helped the endowment reach $30 million, up from a low of $23 million two years ago.
21-year-old charged in November vandalisms
Suspect surrenders; prosecutor credits work by police officers
July 8, 2004
After an eight-month investigation, three discarded suspects and a trail of broken glass, police and prosecutors say they’ve caught the person responsible for a citywide BB gun vandalism spree. “This was a very complicated case that officers continued to work, even once they thought that they had the right suspects,” Dist. Atty. Christine Kenney said.
European carriers to buy Boeing Dreamliner jets
Chicago-based company lands orders for 10 planes
July 8, 2004
Two air charter carriers, Blue Panorama of Italy and First Choice Airways of the United Kingdom, are the first in Europe that plan to buy Boeing Co.’s new 7E7 Dreamliner passenger jets, the company said Wednesday. Blue Panorama plans to order four of the 7E7 jets while First Choice, formerly Air 2000, expects to buy six, Boeing said.
Shell refinery investigated
July 8, 2004
The Federal Trade Commission has begun a formal investigation of the proposed shutdown of a Shell Oil Co. refinery in California to determine possible antitrust violations, a senior FTC official said Wednesday.
Fighting to finish
Nemechek’s team struggles with string of bad luck
July 8, 2004
Is it time to change Joe Nemechek’s nickname to “Bad Luck” Joe? It appeared for a while this season Nemechek couldn’t get out of the way of his own shadow, or anybody else’s for that matter.
Teamwork pays off for Gordon, Johnson at Daytona
July 8, 2004
A pair of Chevrolets at the front of the field, fending off all adversaries to extend their team’s streak of success in a NASCAR Nextel Cup restrictor-plate race. The plot was familiar in Saturday night’s Pepsi 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway, but the lead roles were cast differently.
Boeing workers approve contract offer
Wichita plant’s employees avoid walkout
July 8, 2004
Technical and professional workers at Boeing Co.’s Wichita plant overwhelmingly voted Wednesday to accept the company’s third contract offer, avoiding a strike by the union. The Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace made no recommendation to its members on how they should vote.
Smoking ban’s effects still cloudy
Businesses fear loss of sales
July 8, 2004
Business is down as much as 25 percent at some Lawrence bars and restaurants since a smoking ban took effect a week ago today. A random survey of about a dozen bars and restaurants found about half where sales have suffered since the ordinance, which bans smoking in virtually all enclosed public places, became law.
Pfizer to offer drug discounts to uninsured Americans
Program to offer average of 37 percent savings
July 8, 2004
Pfizer Inc., the world’s largest pharmaceutical company, will soon offer its medicines at discounts to the country’s uninsured. In an announcement Wednesday, Pfizer officials said the program would give people without drug coverage the same access to prices leveraged by HMOs, major corporations and other entities with large buying power.
Ireland’s health minister vows to punish rebellions of ban
July 8, 2004
The smoke of rebellion rose across Ireland on Wednesday as a handful of pubs let customers smoke in defiance of a government ban. Health Minister Micheal Martin promised to punish the owners of Fibber Magees, a Galway pub that was the first to rebel against the 3-month-old ban, and any others joining the campaign.
Briefcase
July 8, 2004
¢ Federal energy leader to return to Lawrence ¢ Auto companies entice shoppers with incentives ¢ Protection One names new managerial positions ¢ Yahoo profits increase but disappoint investors
Educational firm settles privacy complaint
July 8, 2004
The company that sells the popular “Hooked on Phonics” reading instruction program settled a complaint by the Federal Trade Commission that it violated its own promises against disclosing personal information about customers, including their children, U.S. regulators said Wednesday.
Minneapolis airport streamlines security
July 8, 2004
Select airline passengers breezed through security Wednesday at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport in the start of an experiment to ease delays and make flying a little more agreeable. Under the program, frequent business fliers will not be subject to random searches if they pass background checks in advance and do not set off any alarms while moving through security.
Drug-resistant syphilis spreads
July 8, 2004
A fast-spreading mutant strain of syphilis has proved resistant to the antibiotic pills that are offered to some patients as an alternative to painful penicillin shots. Since the late 1990s, doctors and public health clinics have been giving azithromycin to some syphilis patients because the long-acting antibiotic pill was highly effective and easy to use. Four pills taken at once were usually enough to cure syphilis.
Kidnapping rattles nerves in Philippines
Death threat prompts country to ban citizens from working in Iraq
July 8, 2004
Armed Iraqi insurgents threatened to kill a Filipino hostage if his country does not withdraw from Iraq, according to a video that aired Wednesday. The Philippines responded by barring Filipino workers from traveling to Iraq. In the video broadcast by Pan-Arab Aljazeera television, three armed and masked men stood behind the seated hostage, threatening to kill him if the Philippines doesn’t pull out within three days.
Lawmakers say military reserves near breaking point
July 8, 2004
In a bipartisan show of concern that the military is dangerously overworked, lawmakers said Wednesday the Pentagon is stretching troops to their limit and perhaps undermining the nation’s future force. Amid worries the high level of deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan could discourage potential new service members, Rep. John McHugh, R-N.Y., said it was not reassuring that most reserve components were falling below their recruiting goals for the year.
Military to review Guantanamo cases
July 8, 2004
The military will review the individual cases of the 595 prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to determine whether they are legally held, the government said Wednesday. Officials described it is an attempt to prepare for expected challenges in civilian courts. The move comes in response to a Supreme Court’s decision last week that said those prisoners could go before a federal judge to seek their freedom.
U.S. took uranium out of Iraq without U.N. approval
July 8, 2004
The United States didn’t have authorization from the U.N. nuclear watchdog when it secretly shipped from Iraq uranium and highly radioactive material that could be used in so-called “dirty bombs,” U.N. officials said Wednesday. The nearly 2 tons of low-enriched uranium and approximately 1,000 highly radioactive items transferred from Iraq to the United States last month had been placed under seal by the International Atomic Energy Agency at the sprawling Tuwaitha nuclear complex, 12 miles south of Baghdad, the officials said.
Boxing event headed to HINU
Native American Championships begin today
July 8, 2004
More than 75 boxers will descend on Lawrence today for the Ringside National Native American Boxing Championships at Coffin Sports Complex on the campus of Haskell Indian Nations University. It’s the first time the championships have been held in Kansas, and Slick Revere, one of the event’s organizers, said he hoped the event was here to stay.
Outlaws ‘excited’
July 8, 2004
Day after day, the Lawrence Outlaws baseball team hits the road, playing in games all over the state of Kansas in front of minimal support. Finally, they get to stay home this weekend. And they’re pretty excited about it.
Former KU baseball players making professional debuts
July 8, 2004
Kansas University home run record-holder Travis Metcalf is off to a solid professional start. After 17 games playing third base for the Spokane (Wash.) Indians, a short-season Class A farm team of the Texas Rangers, Metcalf was hitting .284 with seven doubles, a triple and two home runs. His slugging percentage was a gaudy .507.
Wildfire threatens two communities
July 8, 2004
A mountainside wildfire was within a quarter-mile of a $200 million mountaintop observatory Wednesday, but firefighters were most concerned about summer homes in two small communities in the path of flames. Crews continued cutting vegetation Wednesday in the Mount Graham communities, where cabins have been drenched with water and wrapped with aluminum to deflect heat.
Off-road vehicle policy proposed for forests
July 8, 2004
The U.S. Forest Service on Wednesday proposed restricting many off-road vehicles to designated roads and trails in federal forests and grasslands as part of efforts to curb environmental damage and ease conflict between visitors.
Virginia workers clamor to take Sundays off
Day-of-rest’ law mistakenly enacted
July 8, 2004
Workers across Virginia have been telling their bosses that they want Sundays off after learning of a legislative mistake that resurrected a “day-of-rest” law for all employees. Soon after hearing about the new benefit, housekeeping and front-office staff at eight Virginia Beach hotels operated by Professional Hospitality Resources began handing in requests, said Ken Taylor, the company’s executive vice president.
Armstrong takes first Tour lead
Texan dons yellow jersey after team time-trial win
July 8, 2004
It’s the jersey Lance Armstrong covets and works so hard for: garish yellow and awarded daily to the leader of the Tour de France. Armstrong slipped into the jersey Wednesday for the first time at this Tour after he and his team won a rain-soaked time trial. Then the five-time champion said he was ready to surrender the cherished shirt — at least temporarily.
Japan arranges reunion for U.S. Army deserter
Trip allows former soldier to leave North Korea to meet wife, avoid extradition
July 8, 2004
For nearly 40 years, Charles Robert Jenkins has been a wanted man, unable to leave his adopted home of North Korea for fear of being court-martialed for allegedly deserting his Army unit. On Friday, that will change — at least temporarily.
Coaches suggest recruiting changes
Five years of eligibility, more access to players in offseason among recommendations at meeting
July 8, 2004
The National Association of Basketball Coaches recommended a sweeping new recruiting model Wednesday, which included allowing players to be eligible for five years and giving coaches more access to their players in the offseason. The NABC discussed the proposal at its annual summer meeting and will submit a revised edition to the NCAA, which must approve it.
Change for better
July 8, 2004
Simien’s truck rescued from Topeka
July 8, 2004
The parents of Kansas University senior basketball player Wayne Simien traveled to Topeka on Wednesday to retrieve their son’s stolen truck. Margaret and Wayne Simien Sr. of Leavenworth discovered the exterior of their son’s 1992 GMC Sierra was undamaged, but several key items had been stolen.
Event boon to recruiting
All-Star visit to campus lures linebacker to Haskell
July 8, 2004
Sometimes the toughest recruiting job Eric Brock faces is convincing football recruits that federally funded Haskell Indian Nations University really has a campuslike atmosphere. “From what they’re accustomed to, they might think Haskell is maybe two government buildings, like their health clinic back home,” said Brock, now in his third year as the Fightin’ Indians’ football coach.
Carol L. Shull
July 8, 2004
Lois E. ‘Patricia Sue’ Carleton
July 8, 2004
Conservative joins Reform Party in bid to claim state Senate seat
Onetime Republican Assembly president changes party affiliation
July 8, 2004
A longtime conservative Republican leader has switched his party registration in hopes of setting up a general election face-off with state Sen. Mark Buhler, a Republican from Lawrence. The conservative — Jim Mullins of Lawrence — is a former president of the Kansas Republican Assembly and a former two-term chairman of the Douglas County Republican Party.
Turnpike toll costs about to get steeper
Fees to increase an average 5 percent
July 8, 2004
Driving on the Kansas Turnpike is about to get more expensive. And turnpike-style tolls could be expanded to other interstate highways under legislation being considered in Congress. The Kansas Turnpike Authority said Wednesday tolls would increase Aug. 1 by an average of 5 percent across the system, increasing the cost of a trip from the west Lawrence exit to Topeka, for example, to 85 cents from 80 cents.
Enron’s Lay to surrender upon indictment
July 8, 2004
Kenneth Lay, the disgraced former chairman of the Enron Corp. and symbol of an era of unprecedented corporate greed, will face federal criminal indictment Thursday. Lay, who built a small Texas pipeline company into the nation’s seventh-largest public firm and brandished easy access to Washington’s power corridors, even enjoying a “Kenny Boy” greeting from President Bush, faces a series of securities fraud and insider trading charges. He is the 23rd Enron official to be indicted.
School lunch prices to rise a dime a day in Lawrence this year
District’s food services director says increase needed to keep pace with higher food prices, stagnant subsidies
July 8, 2004
Lawrence school board members unanimously agreed Wednesday to add 10 cents to the cost of school lunches, the largest increase of three options under consideration. Elementary students in the coming school year will pay $1.75 per lunch, and secondary students will pay $2.
On the Record
July 8, 2004
Iraqi leader announces emergency powers to deal with insurgents
July 8, 2004
Iraq unveiled emergency laws Wednesday to fight the enduring insurgency, even as masked gunmen battled Iraqi and U.S. forces in Baghdad. The measures give the government broad powers — including the right to impose limited martial law.
Missouri soldier killed in attack in Anbar Province
July 8, 2004
A soldier from south-central Missouri was killed this week in Iraq. Cpl. Dallas Kerns, 21, died Monday of wounds suffered in an attack in Anbar province, the Department of Defense said Wednesday.
Tax in disguise
July 8, 2004
Real estate vote
July 8, 2004
Braves bash Expos, 14-2
Atlanta improves to 6-0 all-time in Puerto Rico
July 8, 2004
Andruw Jones and the Atlanta Braves feel right at home at Hiram Bithorn Stadium. Atlanta completed a three-game sweep of the Montreal Expos with a 14-2 rout on Wednesday night and now is 6-0 in San Juan’s park.
High-profile coaches lend voices to K.C. arena push
Group seeks college basketball hall of fame at site
July 8, 2004
The city’s push for a downtown arena gained a public boost Wednesday from Duke basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski and Kentucky’s Tubby Smith. The two spoke on behalf of the National Association of Basketball Coaches, which has already said it would establish a hall of fame for college basketball in the proposed Sprint Center and move its national headquarters there as well.
Art collection worth millions found in Philadelphia schools
July 8, 2004
To the delight of school officials, a multimillion-dollar treasure trove of 19th- and 20th-century art has been discovered in basements, boiler rooms, closets and hallways in Philadelphia’s cash-strapped public schools. The artworks — 1,200 works in all, including paintings, sketches, sculptures, murals, tapestries and ancient artifacts — had been donated to the school system or bought for small sums long ago.
Quick-stop city’
July 8, 2004
Board’s new leader seeks bond issue
Salkind says overcrowding in junior highs needs to be remedied
July 8, 2004
Putting another school bond issue before voters is among the top goals of the newly elected president of the Lawrence school board. Leni Salkind, elected to the post Wednesday by her colleagues, said there were pressing needs the district would not be able to address without the extra funds a bond issue would supply.
Raiders rebound to throttle St. Joseph
July 8, 2004
Having been around summer baseball for nearly 30 years, Tim Hill pretty much has seen and heard it all. That’s why the veteran coach decided to keep quiet Wednesday night when the Lawrence Raiders dropped their first game of a doubleheader, 6-2, to St. Joseph (Mo.) Post 359 at Free State High.
Woeful K.C. goes 0-for-Minnesota
July 8, 2004
Kyle Lohse didn’t let his fellow Minnesota Twins starters down. Lohse threw Minnesota’s team-record third-straight complete-game shutout, hurling a 12-0 victory Wednesday night over crumbling Kansas City.
House votes to overturn
July 8, 2004
The House dealt an election-season setback to President Bush on Wednesday by voting to overturn restrictions his administration has issued on the gift parcels that Americans can send to family members in Cuba. The 221-194 vote was won by a coalition in which Democrats were joined by nearly four dozen farm-state and free-trade Republicans to rebuff the president.
Report finds many mentally ill youths held in detention centers
July 8, 2004
Thousands of mentally ill youths are unnecessarily put in juvenile detention centers to await mental health treatment, a House committee reported Wednesday. Centers usually are not equipped to treat mental illness, and in some cases the youths have not been charged with a crime, said the report by the Democratic staff of the House Government Reform Committee.