Madison notebook: Scoring game ticket brings tears of joy to KU grad from Lawrence

? Amy Heaton of Lawrence burst into tears Friday after Jerry Bailey uttered six words Heaton had eagerly driven so far to hear.

In the lobby of the KU team hotel, Bailey nonchalantly said: “I have a ticket for you.”

Asked of Bob Billings, a Lawrence businessman who played guard with Wilt Chamberlain on a team that lost the NCAA championship game to North Carolina, 54-53, in triple overtime. Today is the 45th anniversary of that game:

How has college basketball changed since you played for the Kansas Jayhawks in the 1950s?“Obviously, the talent level is so much greater than it was 40 years ago. We had Wilt … but most of us who played would probably play intramural ball now. The coaching is very technical and refined. It’s a better game than it was back then.”

“I started to cry,” said Heaton, a 2000 KU graduate working at Hallmark Cards in Kansas City, Mo.

Her heart had sunk a few minutes earlier when she heard a scalper try to sell a ticket for $400.

“That’s when I really got nervous,” Heaton said.

Bailey stepped in to save the day, and sold Heaton an extra three-game ticket at the $110 face value. He received something more important than cash. In the middle of March Madness, Bailey made friends of Heaton and her fiancKU senior Aaron Schwindt, who landed a ticket through the university’s lottery.

Modified cheeseheads Danny and Jerry Boresow spearheaded the alumni during KU’s showdown with Illinois at the Kohl Center.

The Boresow brothers set themselves apart from the beaked regulars by wearing Green Bay Packers cheesehead hats with Jayhawk stickers and slogans.

Jerry’s top-hat message: “Ahhh … the Power of the Hawk.”

Danny and Jerry are part of KU’s 1995 family of the year because all 14 children in their large Prairie Village family attended the university. A dozen earned degrees, Danny said.

Calvin and Lynette Johnston, who live near Perry Lake, left behind the wolves and waist-high snow of Yellowstone National Park to witness the KU-Illinois showdown.

“It took us two days of driving to get here,” Calvin said. “We went to Yellowstone because we didn’t think we could get tickets to the NCAA Tournament.”

Lynette said the couple has been several times to the national park to observe wolves. In the moonlight, she said, their howls are high on the spook-out scale.

“Instead of cheering, we’ve been hearing howling,” she said.

The Johnstons, season-ticket holders at Allen Fieldhouse, left those stealthy predators behind after securing two seats in the Kohl Center.

Madison notebook: Scoring game ticket brings tears of joy to KU grad from Lawrence

? Amy Heaton of Lawrence burst into tears Friday after Jerry Bailey uttered six words Heaton had eagerly driven so far to hear.

In the lobby of the KU team hotel, Bailey nonchalantly said: “I have a ticket for you.”

Asked of Bob Billings, a Lawrence businessman who played guard with Wilt Chamberlain on a team that lost the NCAA championship game to North Carolina, 54-53, in triple overtime. Today is the 45th anniversary of that game:

How has college basketball changed since you played for the Kansas Jayhawks in the 1950s?“Obviously, the talent level is so much greater than it was 40 years ago. We had Wilt … but most of us who played would probably play intramural ball now. The coaching is very technical and refined. It’s a better game than it was back then.”

“I started to cry,” said Heaton, a 2000 KU graduate working at Hallmark Cards in Kansas City, Mo.

Her heart had sunk a few minutes earlier when she heard a scalper try to sell a ticket for $400.

“That’s when I really got nervous,” Heaton said.

Bailey stepped in to save the day, and sold Heaton an extra three-game ticket at the $110 face value. He received something more important than cash. In the middle of March Madness, Bailey made friends of Heaton and her fiancKU senior Aaron Schwindt, who landed a ticket through the university’s lottery.

Modified cheeseheads Danny and Jerry Boresow spearheaded the alumni during KU’s showdown with Illinois at the Kohl Center.

The Boresow brothers set themselves apart from the beaked regulars by wearing Green Bay Packers cheesehead hats with Jayhawk stickers and slogans.

Jerry’s top-hat message: “Ahhh … the Power of the Hawk.”

Danny and Jerry are part of KU’s 1995 family of the year because all 14 children in their large Prairie Village family attended the university. A dozen earned degrees, Danny said.

Calvin and Lynette Johnston, who live near Perry Lake, left behind the wolves and waist-high snow of Yellowstone National Park to witness the KU-Illinois showdown.

“It took us two days of driving to get here,” Calvin said. “We went to Yellowstone because we didn’t think we could get tickets to the NCAA Tournament.”

Lynette said the couple has been several times to the national park to observe wolves. In the moonlight, she said, their howls are high on the spook-out scale.

“Instead of cheering, we’ve been hearing howling,” she said.

The Johnstons, season-ticket holders at Allen Fieldhouse, left those stealthy predators behind after securing two seats in the Kohl Center.