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Archive for Saturday, August 17, 2002

Pace picks up around campus

August 17, 2002

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Today is the calm before the storm for the Kansas University campus.

On Sunday, most of the 5,100 students who will live in the university's residence halls, scholarship halls and student apartments will haul their mini fridges and lava lamps into their rooms, preparing for another school year. Residents of Jayhawker Towers began moving in Friday. Leases on most private student apartments began Aug. 1.

Overland Park junior Maggie Hodson, right foreground, leads her
sorority in song practice outside the Gamma Phi Beta house, 1339
West Campus Road. Hodson is the song chair for her house, which
will be recruiting freshman students next week. The sorority
recruitment is just one of a number of events taking place as
Kansas University prepares for Thursday's start of the 2002-2003
academic year.

Overland Park junior Maggie Hodson, right foreground, leads her sorority in song practice outside the Gamma Phi Beta house, 1339 West Campus Road. Hodson is the song chair for her house, which will be recruiting freshman students next week. The sorority recruitment is just one of a number of events taking place as Kansas University prepares for Thursday's start of the 2002-2003 academic year.

With the arrival of the residence hall dwellers, the annual migration of students to Lawrence will be complete.

KU officials have scheduled seven days of tradition-filled events dubbed "Hawk Week" surrounding Thursday's start of classes.

The fall sorority recruitment drive also starts in earnest Sunday with meetings between counselors and prospective members. It will culminate Thursday with invitations to new members. Fraternities have been recruiting new members throughout the summer.

The 20-year-old Hawk Week tradition is all about making students feel at home. During the days, organizers focus on teaching students particularly newcomers about KU, its libraries, sports venues, student employment, volunteer opportunities and class locations.

At night the focus is on fun, with activities including an ice cream social, concerts and a dance.

"If you're coming from a small school or don't know a lot of people, KU can be intimidating," said Kristin Trendel, director of new student orientation. "I think (Hawk Week) really helps students to feel like they haven't just been left here. It tells them that somebody is excited about them being at KU."

For students planning ahead, fall break is Oct. 17-18 and Thanksgiving break is Nov. 27-29. Fall semester classes end Dec. 12, and finals wrap up Dec. 20.




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