Archive for Sunday, October 28, 2001

All stories

8th inhalation anthrax case confirmed
Post office vows to keep mail moving as it searches for more tainted letters
October 28, 2001
(Web Posted Sunday at 4:07 p.m.) The Centers for Disease Control and prevention confirmed Sunday that a female New Jersey postal worker has inhalation anthrax, the most serious form of the disease that has claimed three lives and prompted thousands to take antibiotics.
McCain urges more ground troops in Afghanistan
Bush administration braces Americans for long conflict
October 28, 2001
(Updated Sunday at 4:05 p.m.) Sen. John McCain said Sunday that America must unleash “all the might of United States military power,” including large numbers of ground troops, to prevail in Afghanistan. Bush administration officials said the Taliban is being weakened, but warned Americans must be prepared for a drawn-out conflict.
Mailroom workers across Washington are urged to take antibiotics as anthrax precaution
October 28, 2001
(Web Posted Sunday at 10:57 a.m.) Another deadly anthrax-laced letter could still be undiscovered and health officials are urging thousands of people who work in mailrooms across Washington to begin taking antibiotics.
Growing civilian casualties as U.S. steps up Afghanistan air campaign
October 28, 2001
(Updated Sunday at 1:42 p.m.) U.S. attacks on Kabul killed at least 13 civilians Sunday, witnesses said, one day after U.S. missiles rocketed hamlets along the front line north of here, killing and maiming villagers.
s story
October 28, 2001
By Jan Biles Marla Jackson remembers a quilt in her great-grandmother’s house. The quilt was made of pieces of old clothing and scraps of fabric that belonged to family members. The quilted bedspread, her great-grandmother Lucille Crum said, reminded her of significant events in the family’s history and the relationships between relatives.
With heightened airport security, some find it easier to rent child supplies
October 28, 2001
Michelle Lifton thinks flying with her 15-month-old daughter will be difficult enough with the increased airport security. So she’s doing everything possible to make her life simpler.
Economy spurs return of partisanship
October 28, 2001
By David Broder Washington Post Writers Group The length of the war against Osama bin Laden and his Taliban supporters is anyone’s guess, but we now know precisely how long the terrorist-induced truce in American politics lasted: exactly 43 days, from Sept. 11 until last Wednesday.
Executive orders may approve killings of specific targets, including bin Laden
October 28, 2001
Armed with new authority from President Bush for a global campaign against al-Qaida, the CIA is contemplating clandestine missions expressly aimed at killing specified individuals for the first time since the assassination scandals and consequent legal restraints of the 1970s.
Blue Tigers throttle Haskell - Lincoln 56, Haskell 16
Fighting Indians remain winless on season after losing final home game of season
October 28, 2001
By Doug Pacey Nick Wade knows Haskell’s football team isn’t very good this year. When a team is 0-9 and has been outscored 306 to 92, it’s hard to say one’s squad is anything but bad.
Grief, faith and farewell: Last rites say ‘I was here’
October 28, 2001
All that Michael’s father would ever say, whenever he had anything at all to say about it, was, “When I’m dead, just cremate me.”
Arts notes
October 28, 2001
KU murals express feelings about attacks Photos share spiritual, religious themes Country singing legend booked in Ottawa Ballet Hispanico coming to JCCC
Parents opt against baby gear on board
With heightened airport security, some find it easier to rent child supplies
October 28, 2001
Michelle Lifton thinks flying with her 15-month-old daughter will be difficult enough with the increased airport security. So she’s doing everything possible to make her life simpler.
Sibling directors mark new trend
From the Coens to Farrellys, upcoming movies represent a team effort
October 28, 2001
In cutthroat Hollywood, where everyone’s suspicious of everyone else, a lucky few have someone utterly trustworthy to fall back on. Someone with whom they share the workload, with whom they share success and with whom they share genes.
KU men seventh at league
Kansas women eighth as Buffaloes sweep
October 28, 2001
Kansas University’s men’s cross country team placed seventh and the women eighth at Saturday’s Big 12 championships. Brent Behrens led KU’s men with a 13th place finish. He completed the 8K course in 24:39.3. Katy Eisenmenger placed 18th for the women.
Biffle snares fifth win
Driver rallies from two-lap deficit at Outback Steakhouse 200
October 28, 2001
Greg Biffle came back from nearly two laps down to earn his fifth Busch Series victory of the season Saturday in the Outback Steakhouse 200 at Phoenix International Raceway. Biffle, the top rookie in the stock car series and a former NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series champion, came up with his second win on the mile oval in two days.
Region of turmoil
October 28, 2001
Afghanistan is governed by the Taliban, a group that rules according to strict Islamic code, known as sharia. Its leader is the reclusive Mullah Mohammad Omar. After their failed invasion, Soviet forces withdrew in 1989, creating a power vacuum that led to ethnic fighting and civil war.
House GOP prepares tax-cut feast
October 28, 2001
By Mark Shields Creators Syndicate To call House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Bill Thomas, R-Calif., prickly is an understatement roughly comparable to describing rock-star Madonna as flirtatious.
Just the facts
October 28, 2001
Jounral-World Editorial Supplying honest and accurate information should be a basic requirement for developers planning projects in Lawrence.
Notebook
October 28, 2001
Postal Service to buy units to sanitize letters and packages
October 28, 2001
The Postal Service buried a mail handler killed by anthrax the second funeral in two days while the search for the bacteria widened Saturday to thousands of businesses in Washington and 30 mail distribution centers.
Bookstore
October 28, 2001
Pre-planning for funerals a growing trend
October 28, 2001
By Mike Belt In 1993 Charles and Kathleen Suffron looked to the future and faced the inevitability of their deaths. The Lawrence couple planned their own funerals right down to the last detail, from selecting caskets to selecting pallbearers.
Trick-or-treating is the most fun with children in tow
October 28, 2001
By Calder Pickett We never heard of “trick-or-treating” when we were children. American Heritage says that the Ladies’ Home Journal in 1920 wrote about the practice. The magazine also says a North Dakotan says no one in 1935 had heard of trick-or-treat, and children of later times “sold their rights to rebellion for some sugar in expensive wrappings.”
Husband, wife mold clay into functional, abstract works
October 28, 2001
By Jan Biles Yoshiro and Ester Ikeda may share a love of working with clay, but the Manhattan husband-and-wife artists take different paths when it comes to artistic style. Their works will be on display during the First Friday Gallery Walk, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, at Silver Works and More, 715 Mass.
State Cross Country Results
October 28, 2001
Big Unit no picnic for Pettitte
Yankees’ hurler isn’t eager to face Johnson tonight in Game 2
October 28, 2001
Andy Pettitte usually looks forward to getting a rare chance to hit in the World Series. Not this year. Pettitte has the tough task of matching up with Arizona’s nasty left-hander Randy Johnson in Game 2 of the World Series tonight.
Moore’s office reopens in Washington, D.C.
October 28, 2001
U.S. Rep. Dennis Moore’s Washington, D.C., office reopened Thursday morning. It can be reached by calling (202) 225-2865.
Twin sisters are the stars in Gough’s breezy novel
October 28, 2001
Irish author Julian Gough claims he set out to write an “end-of-the-20th-century Jane Austen novel.” But Gough didn’t take the “Bridget Jones” route and slap “Darcy” surnames on stiff-lipped, sideburned bachelors.
Bio tells how singer hit her way into the big leagues
October 28, 2001
When Faith Hill was 17, her boyfriend broke up with her because he thought she was a dreamer who was going nowhere, while he or so he thought was headed for a career in major league baseball.
Haq’s group called U.S. for assistance before killing
October 28, 2001
In the hours before the Taliban government said it executed Abdul Haq, comrades of the doomed Afghan opposition leader frantically phoned American supporters, saying soldiers were closing in.
People
October 28, 2001
New baby for Frasier Get cooking with Jeff Bridges
How they scored
October 28, 2001
How they scored
October 28, 2001
Arts notes
October 28, 2001
Topeka parade seeking entries Acoustic Showcase lists performers KU flute professor to present recital Gallery of Gifts opens in Ottawa Doctor to talk on historic medicine
s group called U.S. for assistance before killing
October 28, 2001
In the hours before the Taliban government said it executed Abdul Haq, comrades of the doomed Afghan opposition leader frantically phoned American supporters, saying soldiers were closing in.
From the Coens to Farrellys, upcoming movies represent a team effort
October 28, 2001
In cutthroat Hollywood, where everyone’s suspicious of everyone else, a lucky few have someone utterly trustworthy to fall back on. Someone with whom they share the workload, with whom they share success and with whom they share genes.
Saying goodbye around the world
October 28, 2001
“For many tribes of the plains, it was customary to expose the corpse on a platform above ground or to place it in the limbs of a tree. This form of burial not only hastened the decomposition of the body, it also helped spread the soul’s journey to the spirit world.”
Plants offer a dose of growth in garden offseason
October 28, 2001
By Carol Boncella Many gardeners will not call it quits until the first frost forces them inside. Given some of the overnight temperatures of the last few weeks, we cannot deny it any longer. So we might as well admit it our outdoor gardening season is over. Now is the time to turn our attention indoors.
s characters, towns
October 28, 2001
When Bill Cannon was left paralyzed on his left side by a stroke 10 years ago, he knew that the only way to keep his body going was to keep his mind in motion. He sold his private investigation business and pursued a long-held dream to record little-known and humorous tidbits about Texas history.
Pre-planning for funerals a growing trend
October 28, 2001
By Mike Belt In 1993 Charles and Kathleen Suffron looked to the future and faced the inevitability of their deaths. The Lawrence couple planned their own funerals right down to the last detail, from selecting caskets to selecting pallbearers.
North Lawrence awaits boom
Property investors remain optimistic in face of economic slowdown
October 28, 2001
By Chad Lawhorn A string of for sale signs in front of North Lawrence businesses isn’t a sign of a neighborhood faltering during a slowing economy, several investors and real estate agents said last week.
Business briefs
October 28, 2001
Horoscopes
October 28, 2001
Daughter unwilling to help mother with expenses
October 28, 2001
Home sale after divorce not unusual
October 28, 2001
Sound collector lives in perpetual nostalgia
Archivist preserves ‘dying sounds’
October 28, 2001
Don Hunter’s passion for sounds began with the night trains, huge steam locomotives that whistled past his house as he lay tucked into bed. The trains would roll into the depot and send off four deep whistle blasts, a signal to the brakeman to walk behind the train to watch for engines that could hit it.
As winter approaches, so does an urge to hunker down
October 28, 2001
By Roger Martin A line from a sad sonnet by William Wordsworth has been running through my head: “The world is too much with us.” The terrorists and the anthrax are bad enough, but now the leaves are drizzling down, too. Can winter be far behind?
Texas trivia and tales
Disabled 70-year-old writes about state’s characters, towns
October 28, 2001
When Bill Cannon was left paralyzed on his left side by a stroke 10 years ago, he knew that the only way to keep his body going was to keep his mind in motion. He sold his private investigation business and pursued a long-held dream to record little-known and humorous tidbits about Texas history.
Volunteers are the difference
October 28, 2001
By Mindie Paget Even Bubbles Galore, the clown, volunteered on Make a Difference Day. With her floppy red shoes and rainbow-striped ensemble, Sharon Dean of Topeka entertained children Saturday at a carnival for special-needs students from Lawrence public schools.
Maintenance prevents wintertime car problems
October 28, 2001
By Mindie Paget It’s like clockwork, Mike Grammer says. About the time winter’s first frigid temperatures hit, automotive shops fill up faster than they can make appointments.
Red Raiders rout Bears - Texas Tech 63, Baylor 19
October 28, 2001
Ricky Williams ran for 153 yards and a career-high four touchdowns on 19 carries, and had a game-high nine receptions for 46 yards, as Texas Tech beat Baylor, 63-19, Saturday. Tech (4-3, 2-3 Big 12) scored on its first four possessions, building a 28-0 lead before Baylor (2-5, 0-5 Big 12) even got a first down.
Dixon sets record
October 28, 2001
Larry Dixon set the Top Fuel elapsed time track record at The Strip at Las Vegas Motor Speedway with a 4.509-second run at 323.19 mph on Saturday night in qualifying for the Las Vegas NHRA Nationals.
Arts notes
October 28, 2001
KU murals express feelings about attacks Photos share spiritual, religious themes Country singing legend booked in Ottawa Ballet Hispanico coming to JCCC
s play addresses tough issues
October 28, 2001
By Jan Biles Many people think of theater as pure entertainment, but what transpires on the stage in the course of a play can also spark a discussion about important issues. That is what Jeanne Klein hopes will happen after seeing Theatre for Young People’s production of “Afternoon of the Elves,” an adaptation of Janet Taylor Lisle’s award-winning children’s book.
Eudora tight end has never lost to Jayhawks
October 28, 2001
By Andy Samuelson Nick Warren wasn’t even playing football the last time Kansas University beat his Kansas State squad. Actually, the Eudora High product was just wrapping up seventh grade in 1992.
Mailroom workers across Washington are urged to take antibiotics as anthrax precaution
October 28, 2001
(Web Posted Sunday at 10:57 a.m.) Another deadly anthrax-laced letter could still be undiscovered and health officials are urging thousands of people who work in mailrooms across Washington to begin taking antibiotics.
October 28, 2001
All that Michael’s father would ever say, whenever he had anything at all to say about it, was, “When I’m dead, just cremate me.”
As winter approaches, so does an urge to hunker down
October 28, 2001
By Roger Martin A line from a sad sonnet by William Wordsworth has been running through my head: “The world is too much with us.” The terrorists and the anthrax are bad enough, but now the leaves are drizzling down, too. Can winter be far behind?
Bookstore
October 28, 2001
Hardcover fiction 1. “Midnight Bayou” by Nora Roberts
by Wildcats
October 28, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Kansas University’s football team was dominated by Kansas State every way possible during Saturday’s 40-6 loss at KSU Stadium on offense, on defense and on coin flips? The Wildcats scored on their first two possessions after winning the coin toss and deciding to defer to the second half, yet still receiving the opening kickoff and having the wind at their back in the first quarter.
t improved under Allen
October 28, 2001
By Chuck Woodling If legendary Emporia journalist William Allen White were still alive, he might pen something like: “Yes, Kansas University, there really is a Governor’s Cup.” Or to paraphrase that too-often-used line by Dorothy in the “Wizard of Oz”: “Toto, it doesn’t look like we’re going to see Kansas win the Governor’s Cup anymore.”
Struggling KU offense likely loses Hill
October 28, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Kansas University coach Terry Allen told anyone who would listen during the week leading up to the Sunflower State Showdown that despite its struggles, Kansas State still had a darn good defense.
Honor veterans
October 28, 2001
To the editor: I am writing about the proliferation of flags, T-shirts and other signs of patriotism so prominently, and rightly, displayed in support of our country and its men and women in our armed forces. Might I make a suggestion? Figure out what you paid for your flag or decal or T-shirt and make an equivalent donation to paralyzed or disabled veterans. Those men and women are still paying a steep price for the liberties we have. A modest contribution from the thousands of purchasers of “United We Stand” materials would show them that they are not forgotten.
KU volleyball loses
October 28, 2001
Texas Tech swept Kansas, 30-24, 30-21 and 30-26 in college volleyball Saturday. Danielle McHenry and Sarah Rome had 12 and 10 kills respectively for KU (13-10, 3-9). Tech is 13-8, 6-6.
Hubbard Street brings sensual moves to Lied
October 28, 2001
Hubbard Street Dance Chicago will perform a concert of contemporary dance at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Lied Center. The program begins with “Petite Mort (Small Death).” Six men and six women will dance this sensual ballet to Mozart’s piano concertos.
Legislation deals with paying farmers to set aside land for habitats
October 28, 2001
Which is most beneficial to wildlife?
Bamboozled bobcat bites man calling turkeys in Reno County
October 28, 2001
Through the years, Justin Maley has suffered his share of bad luck while turkey hunting. He’s been spotted by the sharp-eyed birds, had turkeys spooked by other hunters and had turkeys coming to calls abruptly stop out of range.
But blustery wind plays hob with search for large white bass
October 28, 2001
By Ned Kehde To the relief of a number of local anglers, the blue fin season began in earnest on Oct. 9 at Melvern Lake. Before their magical manifestation, fishermen feared Melvern’s blue fin population was so slim that this traditional autumnal affair wouldn’t occur.
Kansas women eighth as Buffaloes sweep
October 28, 2001
Kansas University’s men’s cross country team placed seventh and the women eighth at Saturday’s Big 12 championships. Brent Behrens led KU’s men with a 13th place finish. He completed the 8K course in 24:39.3. Katy Eisenmenger placed 18th for the women.
Region of turmoil
October 28, 2001
Afghanistan is governed by the Taliban, a group that rules according to strict Islamic code, known as sharia. Its leader is the reclusive Mullah Mohammad Omar. After their failed invasion, Soviet forces withdrew in 1989, creating a power vacuum that led to ethnic fighting and civil war.
Personnel and equipment involved in the operations against the Taliban regime and the terrorist group al-Qaida.
October 28, 2001
Developments in Afghan-istan have seen the deployment of several United States military units and devices. Special forces units, highly advanced weaponry and new advances in ballistics all have been employed in neutralizing terrorist camps and training facilities in Afghanistan.
Halloween objects haunt collectors
October 28, 2001
Halloween is second only to Christmas among collectors. The shows are now filled with jack-o’-lanterns, costumes and paper cutouts of witches and goblins. Even candy containers and trick-or-treat bags are in demand.
Ambition drives Chinese students
October 28, 2001
By J. Kristian Pueschel Special to the Journal-World Barbara and I like to say we lived in China for two weeks. “You mean visiting,” corrected a friend of ours upon hearing about our recent adventure. However, it was not a visit in the usual terms; we were not the regular tourists-as-voyeurs for these 14 days. Other than our American hosts, we talked and traveled only with Chinese teachers and students.
Prearranged funerals grow in popularity
October 28, 2001
By Mike Belt In 1993 Charles and Kathleen Suffron looked to the future and faced the inevitability of their deaths. The Lawrence couple planned their own funerals right down to the last detail, from selecting caskets to selecting pallbearers. “They did it all on their own and nothing was overlooked,” said the Suffrons’ daughter, Patsy Lankford, also of Lawrence.
at the Spencer Museum od Art through December 30th.
October 28, 2001
By Michael Newman When Spencer Museum of Art curatorial intern Elissa Anderson undertook her first assignment to assemble an art exhibition, it was to produce this fall’s annual photography exhibit. A doctoral candidate in art history, Anderson’s specialty is 17th century Dutch and Flemish art. As such, she’s spent a lot of time studying religious imagery in art, since devotional iconography is central to European art of this period.
Cultural lessons
Ambition drives Chinese students
October 28, 2001
By J. Kristian Pueschel Special to the Journal-World Barbara and I like to say we lived in China for two weeks. “You mean visiting,” corrected a friend of ours upon hearing about our recent adventure. However, it was not a visit in the usual terms; we were not the regular tourists-as-voyeurs for these 14 days. Other than our American hosts, we talked and traveled only with Chinese teachers and students.
Prearranged funerals grow in popularity
October 28, 2001
By Mike Belt In 1993 Charles and Kathleen Suffron looked to the future and faced the inevitability of their deaths. The Lawrence couple planned their own funerals right down to the last detail, from selecting caskets to selecting pallbearers. “They did it all on their own and nothing was overlooked,” said the Suffrons’ daughter, Patsy Lankford, also of Lawrence.
Briefcase
October 28, 2001
Dining out: New York restaurants are top of the price heap Terrorist attacks: Most workers finding support, safety from bosses Production: One-on-one discussions help keep focus on work Motley Fool: Name that company
Hubbard Street brings sensual moves to Lied
October 28, 2001
Hubbard Street Dance Chicago will perform a concert of contemporary dance at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Lied Center. The program begins with “Petite Mort (Small Death).” Six men and six women will dance this sensual ballet to Mozart’s piano concertos.
Children’s play addresses tough issues
October 28, 2001
By Jan Biles Many people think of theater as pure entertainment, but what transpires on the stage in the course of a play can also spark a discussion about important issues. That is what Jeanne Klein hopes will happen after seeing Theatre for Young People’s production of “Afternoon of the Elves,” an adaptation of Janet Taylor Lisle’s award-winning children’s book.
Trio to get involved with community while in Lawrence
October 28, 2001
Pianist Navah Perlman, violinist Kurt Nikkanen and cellist Zuill Bailey have formed a trio and will perform a concert of chamber music at 2 p.m. Nov. 4 at the Lied Center. As part of their performance they will present the world premiere of a work composed by Lowell Liebermann and co-commissioned by the Lied Center.
Stitching an African-American legacy
Lawrence quilter uses bits of fabric to piece together her family’s story
October 28, 2001
By Jan Biles Marla Jackson remembers a quilt in her great-grandmother’s house. The quilt was made of pieces of old clothing and scraps of fabric that belonged to family members. The quilted bedspread, her great-grandmother Lucille Crum said, reminded her of significant events in the family’s history and the relationships between relatives.
Green in the house
Plants offer a dose of growth in garden offseason
October 28, 2001
By Carol Boncella Many gardeners will not call it quits until the first frost forces them inside. Given some of the overnight temperatures of the last few weeks, we cannot deny it any longer. So we might as well admit it our outdoor gardening season is over. Now is the time to turn our attention indoors.
Expert advice?
October 28, 2001
CIA considers assassination missions
Executive orders may approve killings of specific targets, including bin Laden
October 28, 2001
Armed with new authority from President Bush for a global campaign against al-Qaida, the CIA is contemplating clandestine missions expressly aimed at killing specified individuals for the first time since the assassination scandals and consequent legal restraints of the 1970s.
Local briefs
October 28, 2001
Downtown Lawrence opens doors for trick-or-treaters Many downtown business will be opening their doors for trick-or-treaters Halloween night. Businesses will open from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. to hand out treats. Witches, princesses and ghouls participated in last year’s Halloween parade at Centennial School. Most Lawrence elementary schools are planning parties and/or parades for Wednesday, and the PTA is sponsoring a pumpkin carving 7 p.m. Monday at Schwegler School. Additionally, the Prairie Park Nature Center, 2730 Harper St., is planning a Halloween Open House from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The Haunted House Visit Terror II for children ages 7 or younger will be from 8 p.m. to midnight today and Monday at Holcom Park Recreation Center, 2700 W. 27th St. __________________________ Charity: Silent auction to benefit needy, homeless residents Needy and homeless Lawrence residents will be the beneficiaries of a fund-raiser planned by the Community Drop-In Center. “Chocolate and Tea At Three” will feature baked goods and music, as well as a silent auction featuring items from Natural Way, Lawrence Athletic Club, Marisco’s, the Kansas City Royals, the Kansas University Athletic Department, The Topiary Tree and others. Tickets are $25. The event will be from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 10 at Abe and Jake’s Landing, 8 E. Sixth St. __________________________ American Red Cross: Junior highs to compete in holiday blood drive South and Southwest junior high students will compete using publicity measures on Halloween to see which school can draw the most blood. There will be no appearance by Dracula, but students at the two schools are joining with McDonald’s for a competitive blood drive, said Connie Edwards, blood coordinator for the American Red Cross in Douglas County. American Red Cross will collect the donations from 12:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday at First Christian Church, 10th and Kentucky streets. Posters made by students to promote the drive are being distributed throughout Lawrence, Edwards said. __________________________ Government: Voters to elect individuals for county extension council Douglas County Extension Council elections will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Deal Six Auditorium at Douglas County Extension Office, 2110 Harper St. Each year, 12 individuals are selected for the council. A nominating committee has selected the following nominees: District I Don Bird, Agriculture; Connie Hadl, Family & Consumer Sciences; Megan King, Economic Development; and Chris Johnson, 4-H Youth. District II Alden Bradley Sr., Agriculture; Carla Westheffer, Family & Consumer Sciences; Sharon Vesecky, Economic Development; David Norris, 4-H Youth. District III Gerald Dwyer, Agriculture; Nancy O’Connor, Family & Consumer Sciences; Carol Keen, Economic Development; Sue Ashcraft, 4-H Youth. Douglas County residents 18 or older are eligible to vote or serve on the council. __________________________ Recreation: Walkers to take 10K stroll around Lone Star Lake Walkers, young and old, will wind their way around Lone Star Lake today and catch a glimpse of the changing of the leaves. The Lone Star Lake Walk is timed to coincide with the arrival of fall in Kansas. Start time is between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Walkers should be finished by 4 p.m. The walk starts at the shelter and goes around the lake on a combination of blacktop and gravel roads. The trail is 10 kilometers. The event is sponsored by Free State Walkers, Lawrence Parks & Recreation, Free State Brewery, Sunflower Outdoor & Bike Shop, Community Mercantile and Yellow Sub.
On the record
October 28, 2001
Splish-splash: World Series was never like this
October 28, 2001
At Yankee Stadium, a splash shot usually means a cup of beer hit its targeted outfielder. At Bank One Ballpark, pool ball has a different meaning. There were no freezing fans bundled in parkas at this year’s World Series opener.
Fear of few blue fin unfounded
But blustery wind plays hob with search for large white bass
October 28, 2001
By Ned Kehde To the relief of a number of local anglers, the blue fin season began in earnest on Oct. 9 at Melvern Lake. Before their magical manifestation, fishermen feared Melvern’s blue fin population was so slim that this traditional autumnal affair wouldn’t occur.
Bamboozled bobcat bites man calling turkeys in Reno County
October 28, 2001
Through the years, Justin Maley has suffered his share of bad luck while turkey hunting. He’s been spotted by the sharp-eyed birds, had turkeys spooked by other hunters and had turkeys coming to calls abruptly stop out of range.
Richardson, Butler pace city girls at Rim Rock
Lions place seventh; Firebirds finish eighth
October 28, 2001
By Steve Rottinghaus From the start, Free State High’s No. 1 girls runner, Mallory Richardson, was a step behind the frontrunners at the girls Class 6A state cross country meet Saturday at Rim Rock Farm. Richardson, 13th at state as a sophomore, finished a disappointing 24th, missing a medal by four placings.
Stewart finally comes around
Controversial driver reluctantly agrees to wear head, neck restraint
October 28, 2001
Tony Stewart disagrees with the way NASCAR mandated head and neck restraints for the drivers, saying the sanctioning body probably was forced into making some kind of move. “I feel like NASCAR made a mistake,” said the outspoken and sometimes rash driver, who had been silent on the issue.
Men and machines of war
Personnel and equipment involved in the operations against the Taliban regime and the terrorist group al-Qaida.
October 28, 2001
Developments in Afghan-istan have seen the deployment of several United States military units and devices. Special forces units, highly advanced weaponry and new advances in ballistics all have been employed in neutralizing terrorist camps and training facilities in Afghanistan.
NHL Roundup: Coyotes’ Burke baffles Avalanche
Phoenix goaltender records 27th career shutout in 1-0 victory
October 28, 2001
Phoenix Coyotes goalie Sean Burke figured he didn’t have any margin for error against the Stanley Cup champions, not with the Colorado Avalanche having yielded just two goals in their last two games.
Political strategy must accompany bombs
October 28, 2001
By Trudy Rubin The Philadelphia Inquirer The Bush administration is belatedly discovering that a political strategy for Afghanistan is as important as bombs and commandos.
Bio tells how singer hit her way into the big leagues
October 28, 2001
When Faith Hill was 17, her boyfriend broke up with her because he thought she was a dreamer who was going nowhere, while he or so he thought was headed for a career in major league baseball.
Natural needle drop no cause for concern
October 28, 2001
By Bruce Chladny The cool weather has made a wonderful backdrop for the fantastic fall display of leaves. Bright yellows, oranges and reds remind us that the warm days of summer are quickly fading into the cold days of winter.
Economy spurs return of partisanship
October 28, 2001
By David Broder Washington Post Writers Group The length of the war against Osama bin Laden and his Taliban supporters is anyone’s guess, but we now know precisely how long the terrorist-induced truce in American politics lasted: exactly 43 days, from Sept. 11 until last Wednesday.
Political strategy must accompany bombs
October 28, 2001
By Trudy Rubin The Philadelphia Inquirer The Bush administration is belatedly discovering that a political strategy for Afghanistan is as important as bombs and commandos.
Growing civilian casualties as U.S. steps up Afghanistan air campaign
October 28, 2001
(Updated Sunday at 1:42 p.m.) U.S. attacks on Kabul killed at least 13 civilians Sunday, witnesses said, one day after U.S. missiles rocketed hamlets along the front line north of here, killing and maiming villagers.
Arts notes
October 28, 2001
KU jazz musicians to present concert Baldwin couple to show prints Dance concert geared toward the younger set Kansas Authors Club honors three writers
s breezy novel
October 28, 2001
Irish author Julian Gough claims he set out to write an “end-of-the-20th-century Jane Austen novel.” But Gough didn’t take the “Bridget Jones” route and slap “Darcy” surnames on stiff-lipped, sideburned bachelors.
October 28, 2001
Don Hunter’s passion for sounds began with the night trains, huge steam locomotives that whistled past his house as he lay tucked into bed. The trains would roll into the depot and send off four deep whistle blasts, a signal to the brakeman to walk behind the train to watch for engines that could hit it.
Taliban front line hit hard
October 28, 2001
In what witnesses called the heaviest such strikes of the air campaign, U.S. warplanes staged a daylong assault Saturday on Taliban front lines in the north of Afghanistan. However, Britain’s Sky News television reported one of the U.S. missiles went awry and struck a village behind anti-Taliban opposition lines.
Post office vows to keep mail moving as it searches for more tainted letters
October 28, 2001
(Web Posted Sunday at 4:07 p.m.) The Centers for Disease Control and prevention confirmed Sunday that a female New Jersey postal worker has inhalation anthrax, the most serious form of the disease that has claimed three lives and prompted thousands to take antibiotics.
Bush administration braces Americans for long conflict
October 28, 2001
(Updated Sunday at 4:05 p.m.) Sen. John McCain said Sunday that America must unleash “all the might of United States military power,” including large numbers of ground troops, to prevail in Afghanistan. Bush administration officials said the Taliban is being weakened, but warned Americans must be prepared for a drawn-out conflict.
People
October 28, 2001
New baby for Frasier Get cooking with Jeff Bridges
Arts notes
October 28, 2001
KU jazz musicians to present concert Baldwin couple to show prints Dance concert geared toward the younger set Kansas Authors Club honors three writers
Kansas netters ousted
October 28, 2001
Kansas University’s women’s tennis team was eliminated from the ITA Central Regional Tournament Saturday in Tulsa, Okla. Twins Courntey and Kristen Steinbock lost their first doubles match as they were defeated by Colorado State’s Sanja Hanssen and Catherine Sulivan 9-8.
Since attacks, airport security checks are varied and harried
October 28, 2001
The first time Melissa Marcello of Washington had her bags individually hand-searched, she burst into tears from embarrassment and frustration. It was a few weeks after the Sept. 11 attacks, and she was flying to Washington out of Westchester County Airport in New York.
KU golfers 10th at Stanford tourney
October 28, 2001
Kansas University’s men’s golf team improved one place to stand in 10th place in a 15-team field after Saturday’s second round of The Nelson-Stanford Invitational. Kansas shot a second round total of 284, better than 10 other schools competing, good for a two-round total of 576 at the 6,786 yard, par-71 Stanford University Golf Course.
Lawmakers, administrators designing plan for terrorist attack insurance
October 28, 2001
The Bush administration and key lawmakers have drawn up the outlines of a government aid package that would help the insurance industry withstand future terrorist attacks. They hope to introduce legislation next week.
Peace rally draws crowd, protests U.S. retaliation
October 28, 2001
By Joy Ludwig More than 70 people from several groups gathered Saturday afternoon for a peace rally and vigil to advocate alternatives to war. The Lawrence Peace and Justice Coalition sponsored a vigil, “Lawrence Responds to Terrorism,” at the corner of 11th and Massachusetts streets.
Finding your way through funeral planning
October 28, 2001
The numbers are fairly convincing on this: 100 percent of us will die. Here are some tips to help make this event as neatly planned as possible for you and your family:
Spring-flowering bulbs have planting-bed needs
October 28, 2001
Halloween is the traditional deadline for planting spring-flowering crocus, daffodil, hyacinth, tulip, snowdrop and other hardy bulbs in the central High Plains.
Patriotic stamp debuts in East
October 28, 2001
After the tragic events of Sept. 11, the U.S. Postal Service hastily prepared a new 34-cent definitive stamp tilted “United We Stand,” but officials did not announce a date of issuance at that time because it did not print enough stamps for nationwide distribution.
KU exhibit celebrates Day of the Dead
October 28, 2001
An exhibit at Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology documents a Hispanic celebration called Los Dias de Los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead. The celebration occurs around Halloween, but instead of portraying death as morbid, the Day of the Dead is about the happy reunion of the living with the spirits of their deceased loved ones.
Symphony Orchestra concert features percussionists, wind instruments and strings
October 28, 2001
The Kansas University Symphony Orchestra performs four works remarkable for their distinct themes during the orchestra’s concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the Lied Center. More than 30 percussion instruments appear in “Ionisation,” by futurist composer Edgard Varse.
Tips assist in funeral planning
October 28, 2001
The numbers are fairly convincing on this: 100 percent of us will die. Here are some tips to help make this event as neatly planned as possible for you and your family.
Trio to get involved with community while in Lawrence
October 28, 2001
Pianist Navah Perlman, violinist Kurt Nikkanen and cellist Zuill Bailey have formed a trio and will perform a concert of chamber music at 2 p.m. Nov. 4 at the Lied Center. As part of their performance they will present the world premiere of a work composed by Lowell Liebermann and co-commissioned by the Lied Center.
Lawrence commuter report
October 28, 2001
The following construction projects may affect commuter traffic this week in the region: U.S. Highway 59, just south of Lawrence in Douglas County, north and southbound traffic reduced to one lane for bridge repair and overlay.
s second season
October 28, 2001
Jon Beckerman and Rob Burnett, the creators of “Ed,” would like the show’s devotees to know that they remain big fans of the Foo Fighters, whose song “Next Year” served as the show’s theme song during its first season.
scraps WTC episode
October 28, 2001
“Crossing Over” has crossed back from a plan to air segments in which its host, psychic John Edward, claims to contact some of those who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Bending to strong objections from station executives and advertisers, Studios USA Domestic Television scrapped the idea of the terrorism-related TV seances.
Paterno breaks Bryant’s record
Penn State edges Ohio State to give coach 324th victory with Nittany Lions
October 28, 2001
Joe Paterno spent the last three months saying his chase for the major college victory record was no big deal. Now that he’s got it, he’s changing his tune.
Expert advice?
October 28, 2001
To the editor: Recently, medical experts advised postal employees they were at little or no risk of infection from processing letters containing anthrax. Now these “experts” claim they didn’t know spores could leak from a sealed envelope in transit. Some blame insufficient funding. What hogwash. They knew Sen. Daschle’s letter contained weaponized spores (easily dispersed and floated in air). There should have been immediate, concerted efforts to check the delivery routes for possible contamination points, and to warn postal workers.
Spencer Museum photo show focuses on faith
Signs of Faith: Images from the Collection” at the Spencer Museum od Art through December 30th.
October 28, 2001
By Michael Newman When Spencer Museum of Art curatorial intern Elissa Anderson undertook her first assignment to assemble an art exhibition, it was to produce this fall’s annual photography exhibit. A doctoral candidate in art history, Anderson’s specialty is 17th century Dutch and Flemish art. As such, she’s spent a lot of time studying religious imagery in art, since devotional iconography is central to European art of this period.
How to recognize, and stop, symptoms of ‘economic abuse’
October 28, 2001
When I was an innocent college student in the early ‘70s, I took it for granted that all the women I knew would have careers, make as much as men in the same jobs and when they set up households pay half the expenses and have an equal say in all decisions.
Top 25 Roundup: Stanford upends UCLA, 38-28
October 28, 2001
Chris Lewis just doesn’t understand goosebumps. After a thrilling win over UCLA, his Stanford teammates know all about them. In his fourth career start, Lewis threw for 250 yards and three touchdowns as No. 20 Stanford held on for a 38-28 victory over No. 4 UCLA on Saturday, ending the Bruins’ unbeaten season and thoroughly muddling the Pac-10 race.
Friday’s Late top 25 game: Warriors stun Fresno
October 28, 2001
Nick Rolovich needed just one healthy shoulder to upend No. 18 Fresno State. Rolovich overcame a dislocated shoulder late in the fourth quarter and threw a 14-yard touchdown pass to Ashley Lelie with 13 seconds left as Hawaii stunned Fresno State, 38-34, late Friday night.
Fossil fuel tap
October 28, 2001
Aggies hold off Cyclones - Texas A&M 24, Iowa State 21
October 28, 2001
Derek Farmer didn’t have much to say about the play of the game. His big run said it all. Farmer, a true freshman playing in his eighth college game, ran 65 yards for a touchdown with 5:08 to play as Texas A&M held off Iowa State for a 24-21 victory Saturday.
Saying goodbye around the world
October 28, 2001
“For many tribes of the plains, it was customary to expose the corpse on a platform above ground or to place it in the limbs of a tree. This form of burial not only hastened the decomposition of the body, it also helped spread the soul’s journey to the spirit world.”
Finding your way through funeral planning
October 28, 2001
The numbers are fairly convincing on this: 100 percent of us will die. Here are some tips to help make this event as neatly planned as possible for you and your family:
Retailers warm up to stress-free shopping
October 28, 2001
Bergdorf Goodman will set up TV sets in its men’s clothing department and offer children’s book readings this holiday season. Intimate Brands’ Bath & Body Works is training employees to sweeten their sales pitch of new offerings, including the company’s spa and aromatherapy line.
The Motley Fool
October 28, 2001
Last week’s question, answer Money market funds
Spring-flowering bulbs have planting-bed needs
October 28, 2001
Halloween is the traditional deadline for planting spring-flowering crocus, daffodil, hyacinth, tulip, snowdrop and other hardy bulbs in the central High Plains.
Patriotic stamp debuts in East
October 28, 2001
After the tragic events of Sept. 11, the U.S. Postal Service hastily prepared a new 34-cent definitive stamp tilted “United We Stand,” but officials did not announce a date of issuance at that time because it did not print enough stamps for nationwide distribution.
Trick-or-treating is the most fun with children in tow
October 28, 2001
By Calder Pickett We never heard of “trick-or-treating” when we were children. American Heritage says that the Ladies’ Home Journal in 1920 wrote about the practice. The magazine also says a North Dakotan says no one in 1935 had heard of trick-or-treat, and children of later times “sold their rights to rebellion for some sugar in expensive wrappings.”
Husband, wife mold clay into functional, abstract works
October 28, 2001
By Jan Biles Yoshiro and Ester Ikeda may share a love of working with clay, but the Manhattan husband-and-wife artists take different paths when it comes to artistic style. Their works will be on display during the First Friday Gallery Walk, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, at Silver Works and More, 715 Mass.
Halloween objects haunt collectors
October 28, 2001
Halloween is second only to Christmas among collectors. The shows are now filled with jack-o’-lanterns, costumes and paper cutouts of witches and goblins. Even candy containers and trick-or-treat bags are in demand.
KU exhibit celebrates Day of the Dead
October 28, 2001
An exhibit at Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology documents a Hispanic celebration called Los Dias de Los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead. The celebration occurs around Halloween, but instead of portraying death as morbid, the Day of the Dead is about the happy reunion of the living with the spirits of their deceased loved ones.
Symphony Orchestra concert features percussionists, wind instruments and strings
October 28, 2001
The Kansas University Symphony Orchestra performs four works remarkable for their distinct themes during the orchestra’s concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the Lied Center. More than 30 percussion instruments appear in “Ionisation,” by futurist composer Edgard Var.
Youngsters miss real meaning of Halloween
October 28, 2001
By Dave Barry Miami Herald I love Halloween, because it reminds me of a simpler, more-innocent time a time when I dressed up as a goblin and ran around the neighborhood shouting “Trick or treat!”
Tips assist in funeral planning
October 28, 2001
The numbers are fairly convincing on this: 100 percent of us will die. Here are some tips to help make this event as neatly planned as possible for you and your family.
Since attacks, airport security checks are varied and harried
October 28, 2001
The first time Melissa Marcello of Washington had her bags individually hand-searched, she burst into tears from embarrassment and frustration. It was a few weeks after the Sept. 11 attacks, and she was flying to Washington out of Westchester County Airport in New York.
Natural needle drop no cause for concern
October 28, 2001
By Bruce Chladny The cool weather has made a wonderful backdrop for the fantastic fall display of leaves. Bright yellows, oranges and reds remind us that the warm days of summer are quickly fading into the cold days of winter.
Free State environs
October 28, 2001
Old home town - 100 years ago today
October 28, 2001
Lawmakers, administrators designing plan for terrorist attack insurance
October 28, 2001
The Bush administration and key lawmakers have drawn up the outlines of a government aid package that would help the insurance industry withstand future terrorist attacks. They hope to introduce legislation next week.
Honor veterans
October 28, 2001
Last Man’s Club is down but not out
October 28, 2001
Members of The Last Man’s Club have been playing blackjack every year since 1937. Formed by 14 Wichita East High School seniors who vowed that their friendships would not fade after graduation, the club met again Friday.
Western Resources gives KCC details of corporate restructuring
October 28, 2001
The Kansas Corporation Commission on Friday heard details of Western Resources new corporate restructuring plan during a meeting with the Western’s chairman David Wittig.
Trooper shoots suspect fleeing from Colorado
Driver killed took patrol officials through unusual chase maneuvers
October 28, 2001
A Kansas Highway Patrol trooper shot and killed a man who led authorities on a car chase that started in Colorado and ended in northwest Kansas, the patrol said. The patrol said the man shot in Friday’s chase was from Indiana but it had not released his name Saturday afternoon.
Students, school sites out of sync in district
Map an eye-opener for officials
October 28, 2001
By Tim Carpenter Lawrence public school officials are studying a new, thought-provoking map. It shows that the youngest students live mostly where the schools are not. The new map from the Lawrence-Douglas County Planning Office illustrates in living color the concentration of school children on the city’s perimeter, especially west of Iowa Street.
Gambling expansion re-examined as state budget shortfalls mount
October 28, 2001
By Scott Rothschild By this time next year, you may be able to gamble with a slot machine at a racetrack, or drive to a convenience store and play a hand of video poker. Supporters and opponents of gambling say that the legislative session that starts in January will produce the best chance in years to increase gambling opportunities in Kansas.
Bacteria search widens
Postal Service to buy units to sanitize letters and packages
October 28, 2001
The Postal Service buried a mail handler killed by anthrax the second funeral in two days while the search for the bacteria widened Saturday to thousands of businesses in Washington and 30 mail distribution centers.
Taliban front line hit hard
October 28, 2001
In what witnesses called the heaviest such strikes of the air campaign, U.S. warplanes staged a daylong assault Saturday on Taliban front lines in the north of Afghanistan. However, Britain’s Sky News television reported one of the U.S. missiles went awry and struck a village behind anti-Taliban opposition lines.
Volunteers adopt wild horses
October 28, 2001
By Joy Ludwig At first, the 11 horses were too timid to step from the trailer onto new territory. Then they saw the green, prairie grass, fresh water and salt blocks that awaited. The 5- and 6-month-old foals had just traveled from a farm in Alberta, Canada, to a 25-acre ranch south of Pleasant Grove, owned by R.C. and Betty Pewtress.
Regents, Washburn talk credits
Board-university dispute over transfer hours questions who’s in charge
October 28, 2001
By Scott Rothschild A dispute between Washburn University and the Kansas Board of Regents goes to the fundamental question of who is in charge of Kansas higher education, officials say. Under agreements signed between Washburn and 14 community colleges, students can stay at the two-year community schools and earn a four-year degree from Washburn.
Israel suspends West Bank withdrawal
October 28, 2001
Israel suspended a planned withdrawal from two West Bank towns Saturday after it said Palestinian gunmen fired on its soldiers. Palestinians said the pullout was supposed to have been unconditional and that the delay shows Israel isn’t serious about peace.
Crossing Over’ scraps WTC episode
October 28, 2001
“Crossing Over” has crossed back from a plan to air segments in which its host, psychic John Edward, claims to contact some of those who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Bending to strong objections from station executives and advertisers, Studios USA Domestic Television scrapped the idea of the terrorism-related TV seances.
Students question program quality
October 28, 2001
By Terry Rombeck Visual communication students at Kansas University say they’re worried about their program. They’ve petitioned Toni-Marie Montgomery, dean of the School of Fine Arts, saying a lack of full-time faculty and sub-par classroom and computer labs are hurting their education.
News Center just one example of media convergence
October 28, 2001
One hundred years ago, there was no radio, no television, no Internet. The same thing may be true 100 years from now. Even the mighty newspaper that durable hunk of tree you hold in your hand, that survivor in the age of CNN.com could be history, if someone finds a way to deliver the news with the depth of a newspaper and the speed of television.
The World Company takes innovative approach in merging news operations resources
October 28, 2001
In the news business, it’s called “convergence.” Across the country, newspapers, television stations, online operations and radio stations are pooling resources to deliver news in different ways to better serve readers and viewers.
Ed’ replaces its theme song for show’s second season
October 28, 2001
Jon Beckerman and Rob Burnett, the creators of “Ed,” would like the show’s devotees to know that they remain big fans of the Foo Fighters, whose song “Next Year” served as the show’s theme song during its first season.
KSU rolls from flip to finish - Kansas State 40, Kansas 6
KU ‘whipped’ by Wildcats
October 28, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Kansas University’s football team was dominated by Kansas State every way possible during Saturday’s 40-6 loss at KSU Stadium on offense, on defense and on coin flips? The Wildcats scored on their first two possessions after winning the coin toss and deciding to defer to the second half, yet still receiving the opening kickoff and having the wind at their back in the first quarter.
K-State proves KU hasn’t improved under Allen
October 28, 2001
By Chuck Woodling If legendary Emporia journalist William Allen White were still alive, he might pen something like: “Yes, Kansas University, there really is a Governor’s Cup.” Or to paraphrase that too-often-used line by Dorothy in the “Wizard of Oz”: “Toto, it doesn’t look like we’re going to see Kansas win the Governor’s Cup anymore.”
Huskers derail Sooners, 20-10
October 28, 2001
Oklahoma is out and Nebraska is in the national title race for now. Third-ranked Nebraska beat Oklahoma, 20-10, in a defensive struggle Saturday, derailing the No. 2 Sooners’ hopes of repeating as national champions and ending their 20-game winning streak.
World Series: D’backs dandy in opener
October 28, 2001
Curt Schilling and his Arizona crew made the New York Yankees look like bumbling World Series rookies. In a startling opener, the three-time champion Yankees completely broke down at Bank One Ballpark, making it easy for Schilling and the Diamondbacks to romp, 9-1, Saturday night.
McClain, LHS boys second; Free State boys place third
October 28, 2001
By Steve Rottinghaus Despite a challenge from Lawrence’s two high schools, Shawnee Mission Northwest remains cross country king. The Cougars placed three runners in the top 10 on Saturday at Rim Rock Farm to capture their eighth consecutive Class 6A state boys title.
Conference aims to improve lives of people battling AIDS
October 28, 2001
Faye Gonzalez said she volunteered to be injected with a new experimental vaccine against HIV after the virus took the life of a close friend last year. “If by helping to develop a vaccine I could spare somebody else that pain, then I want to be part of that,” Gonzalez, 35, said recently after receiving one in a series of test shots.
GOP’s right wing up in arms over overtures toward gays
October 28, 2001
Bit by bit, the evidence accumulates, and some conservatives are dismayed at what they see: a Republican administration sending low-key but clear signals that gays are welcomed in its ranks and respected as a voting bloc.
McVeigh’s defense tab $15 million, records show
October 28, 2001
The government spent more than $15 million defending convicted Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh $1.3 million of it as his lawyers tried to delay his execution after he was sentenced.
Nation/World Briefs
October 28, 2001
NEW YORK: Small earthquake rattles NYC region California: $600 million gift announced to Caltech MOSCOW: Footage of sunken sub shows interior carnage Northern Ireland: Protestant party backs minister who resigned
Merc features locally made products
October 28, 2001
By Mindie Paget and Joy Ludwig Nancy Vogelsberg-Busch is excited about her new product. She recently received labels to start marketing her certified organic beef franks under the label “Bossie’s Best.” The smoked meat is made from her certified Hereford-Angus cross cattle raised on the family farm near Home, north of Manhattan.
Peace rally draws crowd, protests U.S. retaliation
October 28, 2001
By Joy Ludwig More than 70 people from several groups gathered Saturday afternoon for a peace rally and vigil to advocate alternatives to war. The Lawrence Peace and Justice Coalition sponsored a vigil, “Lawrence Responds to Terrorism,” at the corner of 11th and Massachusetts streets.
Commuter Q & A
October 28, 2001
William S. Loehr
October 28, 2001
$10,000 signing bonus offered
October 28, 2001
A Wichita hospital, preparing for an expansion in a tight nursing market, is offering $10,000 signing bonuses in an effort to hire 30 more nurses during the next 30 days. Wesley Medical Center will first offer the bonuses, which will be paid out over two years, at a nurse recruiting fair Sunday in Wichita, spokeswoman Helen Thomas said.
Douglas County Commission
Commission may limit types of gun show vendors
October 28, 2001
Agenda highlights 9 a.m. Monday Douglas County Courthouse, 1100 Mass.
Lasorda lends hand in Japan
Former Dodgers skipper baseball’s goodwill ambassador
October 28, 2001
Japan sent Ichiro Suzuki to America, and America sent Tommy Lasorda to Japan. Suzuki runs faster. Lasorda is a better talker. America’s manager emeritus spent last week in Tokyo, offering his wit and wisdom to the Kintetsu Buffaloes and Yakult Swallows in the Japanese Series, that country’s Fall Classic.
Olavarria rips ‘Cats
BU falls, 32-22
October 28, 2001
Louis Olavarria rushed for 124 yards and two touchdowns as Missouri Valley beat Baker 32-22 Saturday in Heart of America Conference play. Missouri Valley (4-5,4-5) extended an 18-15 halftime lead with two scores in the third quarter to build a 17-point lead.
Baseball Briefs
October 28, 2001
Ex-batting champ Fain dead at age of 80 Callers for Series tickets knock out 911 service Rhodes selected MVP in Japan’s Pacific League
Yankees mystique dissolves
October 28, 2001
The New York Yankees’ mystique disappeared about as quickly as Mike Mussina in the World Series opener. Mussina couldn’t make it past the third inning and it was the Yankees who played like World Series rookies, losing 9-1 Saturday night to Arizona.
Farm Bill debate affects hunters
Legislation deals with paying farmers to set aside land for habitats
October 28, 2001
Which is most beneficial to wildlife?
Noonan wins again at 4A meet
BHS boys nab fourth in a row
October 28, 2001
Baldwin High senior Matt Noonan capped a stellar prep cross country career on Saturday with his third consecutive Class 4A individual state championship at Wamego Country Club.
Simms rips Tigers - Texas 35, Missouri 16
October 28, 2001
Missouri didn’t stop Chris Simms for long. Simms passed for four touchdowns and ran for a fifth as No. 7 Texas recovered from a frustrating start to beat Missouri, 35-16, Saturday.
Buffs nip Cowboys - Colorado 22, Oklahoma State 19
October 28, 2001
Bobby Pesavento threw a 21-yard touchdown pass in the fourth quarter and followed it with a 33-yard 2-point conversion pass, giving No. 25 Colorado a 22-19 victory over Oklahoma State on Saturday night.
Coffee decals removed
Sponsor asks for action on Donlavey’s No. 90 car
October 28, 2001
The No. 90 car was just about bare Saturday after team owner Junie Donlavey had the Hills Bros. Coffee decals removed from the sides of the Ford Taurus at the request of the sponsor.
League suspends Gilmour, Varada
October 28, 2001
Montreal Canadiens center Doug Gilmour and Buffalo Sabres forward Vaclav Varada were each suspended for one game by the NHL on Saturday for their actions in Friday night’s game.
Tiznow takes Breeders’ Cup
Horse becomes first two-time winner at annual classic
October 28, 2001
Tiznow turned tiger and made Breeders’ Cup history Saturday by becoming the first two-time winner of the $4 million Classic. It looked as if Sakhee, the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe winner, would deny Tiznow a second straight Classic win on a windy day at Belmont.
Jordan, Pierce developing rivalry?
Celtics’ forward doesn’t back down against Wizards’ legend
October 28, 2001
When you own a closet full of Air Jordans and you grow up watching “Come Fly With Me,” of course you’re going to be in awe your first time on the court with His Airness.
Friends and neighbors
October 28, 2001
Arts notes
October 28, 2001
Topeka parade seeking entries Acoustic Showcase lists performers KU flute professor to present recital Gallery of Gifts opens in Ottawa Doctor to talk on historic medicine
Lawrence commuter report
October 28, 2001
Outdoors Briefs
October 28, 2001
Good deer hunting expected in Missouri Duck stamp contest to start on Nov. 5 Benjamins win boat KC pair crappie titlists
Outdoors Briefs
October 28, 2001
Good deer hunting expected in Missouri Duck stamp contest to start on Nov. 5 Benjamins win boat KC pair crappie titlists
Travel briefs
October 28, 2001
Florida crab fisherman invite tourists aboard Hotels dredge up ghostly histories
Travel briefs
October 28, 2001
Florida crab fisherman invite tourists aboard Hotels dredge up ghostly histories
William S. Loehr
October 28, 2001
Leavenworth Memorial services for William S. Loehr, 84, Ozawkie, will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday at First Christian Church, Leavenworth. Inurnment graveside services with military honors will be at 2:30 p.m. at Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery. Mr. Loehr died Saturday, Oct. 27, 2001, at Colmery-O’Neil Veterans Affairs Hospital, Topeka.
Struggling KU offense likely loses Hill
October 28, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Kansas University coach Terry Allen told anyone who would listen during the week leading up to the Sunflower State Showdown that despite its struggles, Kansas State still had a darn good defense.
Kansas netters ousted
October 28, 2001
Kansas University’s women’s tennis team was eliminated from the ITA Central Regional Tournament Saturday in Tulsa, Okla. Twins Courntey and Kristen Steinbock lost their first doubles match as they were defeated by Colorado State’s Sanja Hanssen and Catherine Sulivan 9-8.
KU volleyball loses
October 28, 2001
Texas Tech swept Kansas, 30-24, 30-21 and 30-26 in college volleyball Saturday. Danielle McHenry and Sarah Rome had 12 and 10 kills respectively for KU (13-10, 3-9). Tech is 13-8, 6-6.
Notebook
October 28, 2001
KU golfers 10th at Stanford tourney
October 28, 2001
Kansas University’s men’s golf team improved one place to stand in 10th place in a 15-team field after Saturday’s second round of The Nelson-Stanford Invitational. Kansas shot a second round total of 284, better than 10 other schools competing, good for a two-round total of 576 at the 6,786 yard, par-71 Stanford University Golf Course.
KSU’s Warren perfect against KU
Eudora tight end has never lost to Jayhawks
October 28, 2001
By Andy Samuelson Nick Warren wasn’t even playing football the last time Kansas University beat his Kansas State squad. Actually, the Eudora High product was just wrapping up seventh grade in 1992.