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Archive for Sunday, October 7, 2001

Lawrence school board

October 7, 2001

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Agenda highlights 7 p.m. Monday 110 McDonald Drive

Bottom Line

Principals of the Lawrence junior high schools will present proposals for new class schedules.

Background

The plans for 2002-2003 advocated by Central, South and West junior highs are identical and embrace the concept of "blocking." The idea is to create a schedule with four or five class periods, some as long as 90 minutes. That would replace an eight-period day composed of 45-minute classes.

Southwest seeks a schedule that retains eight 45-minute class periods Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays. Longer classes would occur Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The district has studied junior high schedule reform for more than a year. A summit meeting of teachers, board members and parents in August 2000 failed to produce consensus on a new scheduling format.

Principals of the junior highs negotiated for months on a compromise. Those talks produced competing plans.

All four principals say their versions will provide teachers an opportunity to collaborate in the classroom. The difference is that Central, South and West will achieve that by breaking down long class blocks, while Southwest will get there by combining short class periods.

Other business

Recognize National Merit Semifinalists and National Achievement Scholars at Free State High School and Lawrence High School.

Receive comments from members of the public, Supt. Randy Weseman, school board President Sue Morgan and board members.

Consider a recommended plan of action from the superintendent that would lead to closure of Grant School, 1853 E. 1600 Road, at the end of the 2001-2002 academic year.

Consider proposed class scheduling changes for the district's junior high schools.

Consider junior high and high school course revisions for the 2002-2003 program year.

Consider a $39,048 contract with Lightspan Inc. of San Diego to buy a computer software system for Even Start Family Literacy programs at New York and East Heights schools. Funding would come from a federal grant.

Consider for final action new board policies on the superintendent's purchasing authority, requirements for bids and residency rules for enrollment.

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