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Archive for Monday, October 1, 2001

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October 1, 2001

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Text messaging on cell phones catches on in U.S.

It's chatting without actually chatting. No annoying ring, or intrusive conversation. It's like getting an e-mail delivered right to your phone.

It's text messaging sending short text messages on wireless phones and it's a growing trend, industry experts say. Businesses especially like it to communicate with employees. It has taken off in Europe. In Asia and the Philippines, above, it's been popular for a while.

In the United States, however, text messaging is still in its infancy. By analysts' best estimates, about 2 percent of wireless customers use the service, sending 150 million messages every month.

In the United States, you can send a message only to someone with the same wireless carrier which may explain its low popularity. But in two years, that could change. Most wireless carriers are upgrading their networks, which will allow all cellular phone users to send short messages to each other regardless of carrier.

Coping via the Web

Innumerable sites have sprung to life to memorialize the terror attacks of Sept. 11. Here a few examples.

Interactive memorial: Comments posted throughout the day to this page at Time.com reflect views from "give peace a chance" to "This is A WORLD WIDE HOLY WAR." Readers are welcome to add their thoughts. www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,174659,00.html

Print the flag: Several sizes and styles of Old Glory are available here for printing. www.nutrifacts.com

Missing: CNN's gallery of photos of those missing from the Sept. 11 attacks is augmented with lists of confirmed victims. www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2001/trade.center/missing

Afghanistan: The PBS NewsHour program keeps this page of ongoing coverage of Afghanistan. www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/asia/afghanistan/index.html

New Sonicblue digital music player shows quality

Sonicblue, one of the companies leading the revolution in digital music players, is betting on a new gadget RioVolt SP250. The RioVolt SP250 plays regular CD and recordable CD formats, which means you could carry more than six hours of high-quality MP3 music files while on the go.

Its rechargeable batteries last 15 hours and it has an FM tuner. It even comes with a nifty on-wire remote control, a leather case with a belt clip, two types of headphones and batteries that recharge inside the unit. It costs just $180, and is a "dream," says one reviewer.

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