Archive for Thursday, November 8, 2001

All stories

Bush seeks to assure, rally uneasy Americans
November 8, 2001
(Updated Thursday at 7:24 p.m.) President Bush urged an uneasy nation Thursday night to meet “our great national challenge” to protect America against future terrorist attacks by volunteering for community service and watching for suspicious activity.
U.S. military making progress, says top commander
November 8, 2001
(Web Posted Thursday at 12:06 p.m.) The top U.S. commander of the war in Afghanistan defended the military’s effort on Thursday, saying, “We like the progress we have had up to this point.
Postal officials ask Congress for funds to make mail safe
November 8, 2001
(Updated Thursday at 7:17 p.m.) The government, not people who buy stamps, should cover $5 billion of the enormous costs of recovering from anthrax attacks and making the mail safe, Postmaster General John Potter told Congress.
Fighting fierce around northern Afghan city
November 8, 2001
(Updated Thursday at 7:28 a.m.) Afghan opposition forces said Thursday they were advancing steadily toward the key northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif with the help of round-the-clock U.S. bombing. The ruling Taliban, however, said they pushed back several opposition attacks.
Pentagon reveals human toll of bombing
November 8, 2001
(Web Posted Thursday at 6:46 a.m.) U.S. airstrikes in Afghanistan have killed scores of Taliban and al-Qaida fighters, although precise numbers are impossible to confirm, the Pentagon says.
6Sports video report: Hayes style changing practice techniques
November 8, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on the Tom Hayes’ changes to the KU football program as interim head coach.
t define women
November 8, 2001
By Ellen Goodman The Boston Globe “I’ve been called oppressed and depressed and repressed and every other kind of pressed you can imagine,” says Milia Islam, as she counts off the adjectives with a smile. The subject of such “pressing” concern is the head scarf that the young Missouri woman wears over her hair.
Alliance fighters move closer to northern city
November 8, 2001
The Afghan opposition claimed its fighters edged closer to the strategic northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif on Wednesday, and U.S. special forces reported northern alliance fighters on horseback charged Taliban tanks and armored personnel carriers.
Crisis drives power back to Washington
November 8, 2001
By David Shribman The Boston Globe The terror attacks of September ended America’s blithe holiday from global concerns, spawned a diplomatic offensive, prompted a military buildup and fundamentally altered the relationship between various levels of government at home.
THE MAG: Art Notes
November 8, 2001
‘Dragon Tales’ basis for touring musical Ottawa native slated for violin concert Lawrence actress plays Ma in ‘Little House’ Organists to perform concert about peace
Jayhawks ‘just good’
Fatigued All-Stars laud Kansas, KU’s transition game
November 8, 2001
By Doug Pacey The EA Sports Central All-Stars were good enough to withstand “40 minutes of Hell” in Arkansas Tuesday night, but couldn’t survive Kansas’ transition game on Wednesday at Allen Fieldhouse.
For incoming NY mayor, it’s all uphill from here
November 8, 2001
Michael Bloomberg’s upset victory in New York’s mayoral race will test the central premise of his campaign that a man who built a major media company from the ground up can now rebuild a city with a devastated downtown and a fragile economy.
Phil Zone sailing away
Shops shift at 14th and Massachusetts
November 8, 2001
By Mark Fagan Neither a recession nor terrorist attacks nor shifting consumer attitudes can push The Phil Zone out of business. But the draw of a cool buzz and tasty waves sure can. “It’s time for me to make a change,” said Phil Sisson, who opened his shop for T-shirts, smoking accessories and alternative-sports equipment with a $3,000 student loan 12 years ago.
Stores slashing prices this holiday season
November 8, 2001
Even before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, it was difficult for Elliot Cohen to attract shoppers to Chalano, his small, mid-priced jewelry store on Fifth Avenue. Now times are tougher, and that’s why last week he decided to woo shoppers with discounts of up to 70 percent off, a markdown likely to continue through the holiday season.
Supreme Court hears challenge to disability law
November 8, 2001
A landmark law protecting the disabled should cover people who want to work but cannot perform a job’s every task, a lawyer for a former assembly line worker with carpal tunnel syndrome argued Wednesday at the Supreme Court.
Food safety needs better security net
November 8, 2001
Legislation to fight agroterrorism is a higher priority now than passing a farm bill, U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts told farmers on Wednesday at the Kansas Commodity Classic. Roberts speaking by telephone from a basement room where his office was relocated after anthrax was detected on Capitol Hill said the agricultural economy and the farm sector should get no less attention than security at airports.
Drugs tested for germ, radiation, chemical attacks
November 8, 2001
American smart bombs zero in on programmed targets in Afghanistan. Bioterrorism protection at home may demand drugs that do just the opposite kill just about any germ target in sight.
Double grind
Harvick tired, triumphant as Grand National season ends
November 8, 2001
There was a day this season when Kevin Harvick, on an airplane shuttling between racetracks, wondered if everything he was going through was worth it. “I’d be laying on the plane wondering why we were doing this,” Harvick said. “And then I thought I had nobody else to blame this on but myself. It wore on me.
Nebraska, Oklahoma favored in Big 12 tilts
November 8, 2001
A Nebraska-Oklahoma rematch in the Big 12 title game seems to be signed, sealed and delivered, right? Anyone thinking Texas vs. Colorado?
THE MAG: Wake Up Call - Living here in Allen town
Mag columnist attempts to go trick-or-treating at Allen Press
November 8, 2001
By Greg Douros Upside-down crosses, anarchy symbols, TV shows like “South Park” these are things that make the authorities shiver in their boots. Snoopy and Woodstock, however, are not your average icons of insubordination. That is unless you work for Allen Press, the Lawrence-based printer of academic journals.
NHL Roundup: Devils deck Thrashers
Holik scores game-winning goal twice
November 8, 2001
Bobby Holik wasn’t happy having to score two game-winning goals for the New Jersey Devils. Holik lost a goal when referees and early replays missed a shot that clearly went into the back of the net with about 4:30 to play.
THE MAG: Wake Up Call Poll
November 8, 2001
Were the Halloween firings at Allen Press justified?  
6Sports video report: Newcomers make big impact
November 8, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on the Hawks’ first exhibition game against the EA All-Stars.
Area briefs
November 8, 2001
Police impersonator may have searched home Police arrest four persons in J.C. Penney shoplifting Student Senate approves conference travel plan Santa Paws photos benefit animals at Humane Society
November 8, 2001
By Dan Lybarger Playwright and filmmaker David Mamet has a soft spot for crooks. From “Glengarry Glen Ross” (about ethically bankrupt real estate salesmen) to “The Spanish Prisoner” (about corporate scam artists), the writer has explored confidence games with voyeuristic glee that often rubs off on a viewer. His eighth film “Heist” in some ways explains and demonstrates this fascination, because Mamet hoodwinks an audience the way his characters rob their victims. This time around, the director is reminiscent of an acquaintance who charms his host to no end while pilfering him. Mamet retreads much of his earlier work, but at least it’s still entertaining.
Briefly
November 8, 2001
Washington, D.C.: Poll: Some still fearful of future terrorist attacks Chicago: Three O’Hare workers fired Arizona: Death penalty sought in backlash killing
THE MAG: ‘Back to the front
Nickelback rockets to the top with ‘How You Remind Me’
November 8, 2001
By Geoff Harkness It was a few weeks ago, standing onstage in New Orleans, that Ryan Peake noticed the difference.
THE MAG: O sister, where art thou?
The Be Good Tanyas stumble upon success after a series of bizarre breaks
November 8, 2001
By Geoff Harkness The Be Good Tanyas are not the kind of band that makes you think of Brooklyn. With sweet, clear harmonies and down-home songs built on a foundation of acoustic guitar, banjo and mandolin, the outfit’s Appalachian folk seems ready-made for back-porch listening rather than the Big Apple’s concrete streets.
Regents predict grim budget
November 8, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Higher education officials Wednesday said they don’t expect good news by the end of the week when Gov. Bill Graves’ budget office makes state spending recommendations for the next fiscal year.
Terrorist assets frozen
Bush has global help; Feds raid businesses
November 8, 2001
In a crackdown at home and abroad, the Bush administration targeted Osama bin Laden’s multimillion-dollar financial networks Wednesday, closing businesses in four states, detaining U.S. suspects and urging allies to help choke off money supplies in 40 nations.
Nearly complete Tyrannosaurus rex comes to KC
November 8, 2001
She’s 67 million years old and once weighed more than 7 tons. A fully mounted cast of Sue the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered is on display at Science City/Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Road. Sue was 42 feet long and more than 12 feet tall.
Powell puts Iraq on notice of campaign
November 8, 2001
Warning Iraq, Secretary of State Colin Powell said Wednesday the U.S. campaign against terrorism will extend beyond the drive to root out the al-Qaida network in Afghanistan. “That is our first priority,” Powell said in a joint news conference with the acting prime minister of Kuwait, Sabah al-Hamad al-Sabah.
NBA Roundup: Celtics outlast Wizards
Jordan scores 32 points in losing effort
November 8, 2001
Michael Jordan gave Antoine Walker some lessons when they practiced together in Chicago during the summer. On Wednesday night, the student beat the teacher. Jordan couldn’t carry the Washington Wizards over the last seven minutes, and Walker countered his late baskets with two three-point plays as the Boston Celtics won, 104-95, in the first of four meetings between the teams.
Contraction talks could begin today
November 8, 2001
Baseball and union representatives could meet as soon as today to discuss which teams will be eliminated, possibly before the new season starts next spring. A day after owners voted to get rid of two clubs with Montreal and Minnesota the likeliest former commissioner Fay Vincent criticized owners for making their decision without consulting the union.
Our Town Sports
November 8, 2001
THE MAG: Best Bets
November 8, 2001
   
THE MAG: Calendar
November 8, 2001
NIGHTLIFE LAWRENCE
People
November 8, 2001
Crazy talk Really crazy talk Concert mini-tour Risk pays off
Briefs
November 8, 2001
Continue to read with older children Small photo albums are personal, portable Act now to reserve a holiday baby sitter Site offers resources for postpartum blues
s transition game
November 8, 2001
By Doug Pacey The EA Sports Central All-Stars were good enough to withstand “40 minutes of Hell” in Arkansas Tuesday night, but couldn’t survive Kansas’ transition game on Wednesday at Allen Fieldhouse.
s all uphill from here
November 8, 2001
Michael Bloomberg’s upset victory in New York’s mayoral race will test the central premise of his campaign that a man who built a major media company from the ground up can now rebuild a city with a devastated downtown and a fragile economy.
Bush seeks to assure, rally uneasy Americans
November 8, 2001
(Updated Thursday at 7:24 p.m.) President Bush urged an uneasy nation Thursday night to meet “our great national challenge” to protect America against future terrorist attacks by volunteering for community service and watching for suspicious activity.
Credit is due
November 8, 2001
Briefs
November 8, 2001
Continue to read with older children Small photo albums are personal, portable Act now to reserve a holiday baby sitter Site offers resources for postpartum blues
THE MAG: What Are You Reading?
November 8, 2001
   
News of the Weird
November 8, 2001
Lead stories According to an October dispatch in London’s Daily Telegraph, Greenland operates probably the world’s most inmate-friendly prison (with all residents having jobs on the outside at market wages and enjoying recreational excursions such as fishing and shopping), emphasizing rehabilitation over punishment (though its recidivist rate isn’t any better than other prisons’). Guards do take up arms, but only on weekend hunting trips when the inmates themselves are armed. The main advantage of the system seems to be that court sessions are brief, in that criminals, not fearing prison, usually confess to everything.
Robert Justin Aycock
November 8, 2001
Memorial services for Robert Justin Aycock, 20, Dallas, will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Highland Park United Methodist Church, Dallas. Burial will be in Farmersville Cemetery. Mr. Aycock died Monday, Nov. 5, 2001, at his home.
Stars shine on red, white and blue night of awards
November 8, 2001
Tim McGraw was named best entertainer at the Country Music Assn. awards Wednesday night during a ceremony that pushed patriotism front-and-center. McGraw added an addendum to his acceptance speech thanking record company executives and his wife, singer Faith Hill. He shouted out his gratitude to U.S. soldiers fighting in the war on terrorism.
Bush to get firsthand look at medical epicenter CDC
November 8, 2001
Officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have complained for years about their World War II-era facilities, with leaky roofs, termite-chewed floors and bad wiring that last month delayed the anthrax investigation.
Drugs tested for germ, radiation, chemical attacks
November 8, 2001
American smart bombs zero in on programmed targets in Afghanistan. Bioterrorism protection at home may demand drugs that do just the opposite kill just about any germ target in sight.
The Be Good Tanyas stumble upon success after a series of bizarre breaks
November 8, 2001
By Geoff Harkness The Be Good Tanyas are not the kind of band that makes you think of Brooklyn. With sweet, clear harmonies and down-home songs built on a foundation of acoustic guitar, banjo and mandolin, the outfit’s Appalachian folk seems ready-made for back-porch listening rather than the Big Apple’s concrete streets.
THE MAG: CD Reviews - Kristie Stremel, Steve Unruh
November 8, 2001
Kristie Stremel “All I Really Want”
November 8, 2001
By Geoff Harkness It was a few weeks ago, standing onstage in New Orleans, that Ryan Peake noticed the difference.
THE MAG: Art Notes
November 8, 2001
‘Dragon Tales’ basis for touring musical Ottawa native slated for violin concert Lawrence actress plays Ma in ‘Little House’ Organists to perform concert about peace
Briefly
November 8, 2001
Washington, D.C.: Poll: Some still fearful of future terrorist attacks Chicago: Three O’Hare workers fired Arizona: Death penalty sought in backlash killing
Horoscopes
November 8, 2001
Japan to expel Afghan refugees
November 8, 2001
Japan, after pledging more than $1 billion to the United Nations to support the care and feeding of Afghan refugees, is closing its doors to nine Afghan citizens seeking asylum from brutal Taliban rule.
THE MAG: CD Reviews - Kristie Stremel, Steve Unruh
November 8, 2001
Anti-global activists tone down WTO protests
November 8, 2001
After bursting on the scene two years ago, anti-globalization activists are struggling to find direction in the aftermath of Sept 11. Some groups are adding an anti-war theme to protests during the World Trade Organization meeting, which begins Friday in the Persian Gulf nation of Qatar and is the first major test of how the anti-globalization movement will respond to the new mood.
THE MAG: Onion blossoms
Satirical weekly newspaper the Onion views everything as a comedy target
November 8, 2001
By Mitchell J. Near In a world turned upside down in the aftermath of terrorist attacks and anthrax scares, one newspaper refuses to succumb to the sort of political correctness currently embraced by most major news media. It’s not The New York Times or The Washington Post, that’s for sure.
THE MAG: What Are You Reading?
November 8, 2001
THE MAG: Movie Listings
November 8, 2001
THE MAG: An act of war
Sam Shepard’s ‘States of Shock’ takes on the aftermath of violence
November 8, 2001
By Mitchell J. Near It’s one of those “fortuitous” events that the staff of Gorilla Theatre wishes had never happened. The group has a new play up and running Sam Shepard’s “States of Shock” that is trendy, edgy and evocative as it digs deep into the human psyche, and how it’s ravaged by acts of warfare. The play has received strong audience support, and its message has never been more timely, but artistic director David Luby swears it wasn’t organized in light of the Sept. 11 terrorist actions.
Pakistan asks Taliban to stop press briefings
November 8, 2001
The yard on a dusty residential side street has become a major point of attack in the Taliban’s monthlong war with the United States. But the yard, a front line in the fight for world opinion, fell silent Wednesday after a pointed warning from the Pakistani government.
Cuba has just glimpses of hurricane’s destruction
November 8, 2001
Cuban officials who traveled to regions hit hard by Hurricane Michelle have found vast destruction: sugar mills wrecked, crops ruined, hundreds of homes destroyed. But with whole communities unreachable by car or telephone, Cuba’s communist leaders said they had no clear picture of the overall damage wrought when the storm’s 135 mph winds whipped across the island Sunday.
World Briefs
November 8, 2001
Spain: Gunmen kill judge in Basque country Sierra Leone: U.N. helicopter crashes Washington: House endorses NATO expansion
Driveway hazard
November 8, 2001
Journal-World Editorial As they consider improvements to the intersection of Seventh and Kentucky streets, city officials should look again at banning left-turn into the post office driveway. Adding a traffic light may reduce accidents at the intersection of Seventh and Kentucky streets, but city officials may be wrong to dismiss the hazard posed by the driveway that provides access to mailboxes west of the main Lawrence post office.
Crisis drives power back to Washington
November 8, 2001
By David Shribman The Boston Globe The terror attacks of September ended America’s blithe holiday from global concerns, spawned a diplomatic offensive, prompted a military buildup and fundamentally altered the relationship between various levels of government at home.
Old home town - 40 and 100 years ago today
November 8, 2001
Scarves don’t define women
November 8, 2001
By Ellen Goodman The Boston Globe “I’ve been called oppressed and depressed and repressed and every other kind of pressed you can imagine,” says Milia Islam, as she counts off the adjectives with a smile. The subject of such “pressing” concern is the head scarf that the young Missouri woman wears over her hair.
A sorry state
November 8, 2001
Lions Club gets earful on SLT plans
November 8, 2001
By Mindie Paget The River City Lions Club convened Wednesday night to get an update on the South Lawrence Trafficway. They also got a taste of how American Indians feel about proposals for the incomplete eastern portion of the road.
Simien shines in KU debut - Kansas 98, EA Sports 77
Freshman forward ‘a beast’
November 8, 2001
By Gary Bedore Drew Gooden put his arm around Kansas basketball freshman Wayne Simien before Wednesday night’s exhibition opener at Allen Fieldhouse. “I could tell he was nervous all day. I said, ‘Hey, Wayne, how you gonna do tonight before 16,300 in your first game?”’ Gooden said.
Child-care directors offer advice to help busy moms and dads
November 8, 2001
Parents looking for child care are usually handed checklists of things to watch for: Is the carpet clean? Do the children look happy? Do teachers have CPR training? Once children are enrolled in a child-care center or home, parents often gripe about the day care and its expenses.
basketball, football coaching
November 8, 2001
By Seth Jones I could have sat here and started writing about how good I think the Kansas University men’s basketball team will do this year. But that’s been done a million times by a million sports columnists. I required something different, something readers would take more seriously. For a true prediction, I needed to consult a psychic.
s outspoken frontman reflects upon current affairs
November 8, 2001
By Geoff Harkness Boots Riley is one of the most respected MCs in hip-hop, but today he’d rather talk politics. This comes as little surprise, given that he’s spent the better part of the decade fronting music’s most politically informed band, The Coup.
Companies go to battle with new gaming consoles
November 8, 2001
Racing across the middle, the receiver caught the the short pass and looked for daylight. But he was quickly mowed down by two burly linebackers, just shy of the first down.
s Mag, with Jon Niccum
November 8, 2001
Whats new in this week’s Mag, with Jon Niccum
U.S. military making progress, says top commander
November 8, 2001
(Web Posted Thursday at 12:06 p.m.) The top U.S. commander of the war in Afghanistan defended the military’s effort on Thursday, saying, “We like the progress we have had up to this point.
Pentagon reveals human toll of bombing
November 8, 2001
(Web Posted Thursday at 6:46 a.m.) U.S. airstrikes in Afghanistan have killed scores of Taliban and al-Qaida fighters, although precise numbers are impossible to confirm, the Pentagon says.
November 8, 2001
By Loey Lockerby Could it be that the Farrelly brothers have mellowed? The guys who created “Dumb & Dumber” and “There’s Something About Mary” have always given their films a touch of sweetness, but they were mostly about seeing how many ways people could be grossed out. Although “Shallow Hal” still has moments that will make viewers laugh and cover their eyes at the same time, it’s a surprisingly gentle, even romantic story about the value of real beauty.
November 8, 2001
By Gary Bedore Drew Gooden put his arm around Kansas basketball freshman Wayne Simien before Wednesday night’s exhibition opener at Allen Fieldhouse. “I could tell he was nervous all day. I said, ‘Hey, Wayne, how you gonna do tonight before 16,300 in your first game?”’ Gooden said.
Jayhawks to face MU in Big 12 soccer tournament
November 8, 2001
By Chuck Woodling Kansas blanked Missouri on bluegrass. Now can the Jayhawks spill the Tigers on Bermuda grass? No. 4 seed Kansas and No. 5 seed Missouri will clash at 1:30 p.m. today in the Big 12 Soccer Tournament at Bermuda-covered Blossom Complex in San Antonio. “It’s probably an advantage for us,” KU coach Mark Francis said of playing on the shorter Bermuda.
More dinos online
November 8, 2001
Here are some Web sites with information about dinosaurs.
Kansas sweeps ISU for another road win
November 8, 2001
Kansas University swept Iowa State, 30-28, 30-18, 30-21, in volleyball on Wednesday, marking the first time that the Jayhawks won back-to-back Big 12 matches on the road. The Jayhawks improved to 15-12 overall and 5-11 in the Big 12 with two of those victories coming against Iowa State. The Cyclones dipped to 4-17 and 1-15.
6Sports video report: Hayes style changing practice techniques
November 8, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on the Tom Hayes’ changes to the KU football program as interim head coach.
6Sports video report: Newcomers make big impact
November 8, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on the Hawks’ first exhibition game against the EA All-Stars.
People
November 8, 2001
Crazy talk Really crazy talk Concert mini-tour Risk pays off
Briefly
November 8, 2001
Lone Star Lake fees come under scrutiny Septic system installers required to be licensed
A rigid fiefdom
November 8, 2001
To the editor: Regarding the recent flap about the firing of two employees at Allen Press, the company indeed has the right to fire employees because they don’t adhere to the company’s dress policy. Moreover, employees of the company have a right to seek employment elsewhere, and the company’s customers have the right to seek another firm to do business with.
Mag columnist attempts to go trick-or-treating at Allen Press
November 8, 2001
By Greg Douros Upside-down crosses, anarchy symbols, TV shows like “South Park” these are things that make the authorities shiver in their boots. Snoopy and Woodstock, however, are not your average icons of insubordination. That is unless you work for Allen Press, the Lawrence-based printer of academic journals.
Interim coach Hayes suspends cornerback Ivey
November 8, 2001
By Robert Sinclair If actions speak louder than words, Kansas University interim head football coach Tom Hayes is making sure the Jayhawks hear him loud and clear. Hayes who was brought in by former coach Terry Allen to be the assistant head coach/defensive coordinator because of his strict, no-nonsense approach to discipline said Wednesday that sophomore cornerback Carl Ivey had been suspended for Saturday’s game at No. 5 Texas.
Communication key for parents, caregivers
November 8, 2001
More tips for parents with children in child care.
s dinosaur egg collection on display at KU museum
November 8, 2001
By Jan Biles Florence and Charlie Magovern are paleontologists in other words, dinosaur detectives. For more than a decade, they have searched for and purchased hundreds of dinosaur eggs. Some of the eggs remain at their Boulder, Colo., home, while others are included in exhibits that tour the United States.
THE MAG: Parting shot
November 8, 2001
Helping hands by Ken Ratzlaff
Anti-global activists tone down WTO protests
November 8, 2001
After bursting on the scene two years ago, anti-globalization activists are struggling to find direction in the aftermath of Sept 11. Some groups are adding an anti-war theme to protests during the World Trade Organization meeting, which begins Friday in the Persian Gulf nation of Qatar and is the first major test of how the anti-globalization movement will respond to the new mood.
Japan to expel Afghan refugees
November 8, 2001
Japan, after pledging more than $1 billion to the United Nations to support the care and feeding of Afghan refugees, is closing its doors to nine Afghan citizens seeking asylum from brutal Taliban rule.
Powell puts Iraq on notice of campaign
November 8, 2001
Warning Iraq, Secretary of State Colin Powell said Wednesday the U.S. campaign against terrorism will extend beyond the drive to root out the al-Qaida network in Afghanistan. “That is our first priority,” Powell said in a joint news conference with the acting prime minister of Kuwait, Sabah al-Hamad al-Sabah.
Food safety needs better security net
November 8, 2001
Legislation to fight agroterrorism is a higher priority now than passing a farm bill, U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts told farmers on Wednesday at the Kansas Commodity Classic. Roberts speaking by telephone from a basement room where his office was relocated after anthrax was detected on Capitol Hill said the agricultural economy and the farm sector should get no less attention than security at airports.
Pakistani president heads West for talks
November 8, 2001
With violent protests at a minimum and key opposition clerics in detention, President Pervez Musharraf is confident enough to take his first foreign trip since Sept. 11, leaving his military government to deal with any threats at home.
Postal Service turns to Congress for help with money problems
November 8, 2001
Grim new revenue projections could lead the U.S. Postal Service to ask Congress for more than $5 billion today to offset higher security costs and lower revenues due to the anthrax scare and terrorism.
Nearly complete Tyrannosaurus rex comes to KC
November 8, 2001
She’s 67 million years old and once weighed more than 7 tons. A fully mounted cast of Sue the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered is on display at Science City/Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Road. Sue was 42 feet long and more than 12 feet tall.
Dinosaur man builds record of life in Maryland 115 million years ago
November 8, 2001
For the last decade, Thomas Lipka has spent much of his free time on his hands and knees in a clay pit, sifting through the soil for traces of dinosaurs that lived in Maryland 115 million years ago.
Dino quiz
November 8, 2001
Test your dinosaur knowledge with these questions.
Behind-the-back dish to Boschee nets layup
November 8, 2001
By Gary Bedore One might expect Kansas’ Kirk Hinrich to make a behind-the-back pass. Or Aaron Miles. This time, however, it was 6-foot-10, 230-pound Drew Gooden who fired a highlight film behind-the-back pass just past halfcourt to a streaking Jeff Boschee.
Vaughn connects for his first basket during return to Utah
November 8, 2001
Former Kansas University guard Jacque Vaughn broke an 0-for-22 shooting slump when he scored seven points for Atlanta in the Hawks’ 96-89 loss to Utah on Wednesday night. Vaughn connected for his first field goal of the season but missed four other shots to bring his season total to 1-of-27. He hit five of six free throws Wednesday night.
Fighting fierce around northern Afghan city
November 8, 2001
(Updated Thursday at 7:28 a.m.) Afghan opposition forces said Thursday they were advancing steadily toward the key northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif with the help of round-the-clock U.S. bombing. The ruling Taliban, however, said they pushed back several opposition attacks.
Postal officials ask Congress for funds to make mail safe
November 8, 2001
(Updated Thursday at 7:17 p.m.) The government, not people who buy stamps, should cover $5 billion of the enormous costs of recovering from anthrax attacks and making the mail safe, Postmaster General John Potter told Congress.
KU graduate dispenses preventative antibiotics to postal workers
November 8, 2001
By Mindie Paget Pharmacist Amy Osborn of Oskaloosa dispenses antibiotics every day. But during the past few weeks, the Kansas University graduate’s ability to perform that seemingly unremarkable task has helped quell the fears of thousands of New York City postal workers worried about exposure to anthrax.
Trickle-down trick
November 8, 2001
To the editor: We are gradually sliding into a recession, and lowering interest rates alone clearly hasn’t helped much.
takes on the aftermath of violence
November 8, 2001
By Mitchell J. Near It’s one of those “fortuitous” events that the staff of Gorilla Theatre wishes had never happened. The group has a new play up and running Sam Shepard’s “States of Shock” that is trendy, edgy and evocative as it digs deep into the human psyche, and how it’s ravaged by acts of warfare. The play has received strong audience support, and its message has never been more timely, but artistic director David Luby swears it wasn’t organized in light of the Sept. 11 terrorist actions.
Pakistan asks Taliban to stop press briefings
November 8, 2001
The yard on a dusty residential side street has become a major point of attack in the Taliban’s monthlong war with the United States. But the yard, a front line in the fight for world opinion, fell silent Wednesday after a pointed warning from the Pakistani government.
Tests find no more anthrax at KC center
November 8, 2001
Additional tests taken inside a contaminated Kansas City postal facility turned up no new anthrax spores, the state’s top health official said Wednesday.
Bush has global help
November 8, 2001
In a crackdown at home and abroad, the Bush administration targeted Osama bin Laden’s multimillion-dollar financial networks Wednesday, closing businesses in four states, detaining U.S. suspects and urging allies to help choke off money supplies in 40 nations.
THE MAG: Movie Listings
November 8, 2001
Bandits You can get away with a lot if you have good characters and a cast to match, as Barry Levinson proves with this otherwise formulaic crime comedy. Bruce Willis and Billy Bob Thornton play a pair of bank robbers who both fall in love with the bored housewife (Cate Blanchett) they take as an all-too-willing hostage. Levinson and screenwriter Harley Peyton pile on the personality quirks, which become absolutely hilarious in the hands of their leads. Willis’ Joe is smooth-talking and impulsive, the kind of guy who never thinks anything through because he really doesn’t need to. Thornton, on the other hand, plays an obsessive, rambling hypochondriac who can literally imagine himself into a serious illness, while Blanchett holds her own as the duo’s defiantly neurotic captive. Even the supporting characters, including Troy Garity as a getaway driver/would-be stuntman, are nutty without being annoying. “Bandits” is about half an hour too long, but even the repetitive scenes take on some new twists in the hands of these actors, who manage to wring every possible laugh out of what they’ve been given. (PG-13) — LL
Senators want to expand opportunities to serve country
November 8, 2001
With military reserves stretched to capacity and America throbbing with a “New Patriotism,” two leading senators are proposing to greatly expand voluntary national-service programs so that ordinary Americans can help defend their homeland.
Blair stands firmly by U.S. in war against terrorism
November 8, 2001
President Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, allies in the war on terrorism, confidently offered back-to-back pledges of victory on Wednesday, no matter how long it takes.
Collison impressed by rookie
November 8, 2001
By David Mitchell No one was any happier than Nick Collison after Wayne Simien dominated EA Sports Central All-Stars in Simien’s Kansas debut. Simien entered Wednesday night’s exhibition basketball game at Allen Fieldhouse after Collison picked up three fouls in the first five minutes.
THE MAG: TOP MOVIES
November 8, 2001
Movies 1. “Monsters, Inc.,” $63.5 million
THE MAG: TOP MUSIC
November 8, 2001
Singles 1. “Family Affair,” Mary J. Blige
s Foster ineligible
November 8, 2001
UCLA running back DeShaun Foster, the nation’s third-leading rusher and a top Heisman Trophy candidate, has been declared ineligible for competition by the school and will miss Saturday’s game against No. 7 Oregon at the Rose Bowl.
preview Sunday night
November 8, 2001
NBC News will try to capture some ratings magic from the upcoming film “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” In an unusual move, NBC News will devote an hour of “Dateline” to covering the making of the Warner Bros. movie and related topics, at 6 p.m. CST Sunday.
Commission stresses college-prep
National panel says rigorous education, training needed to combat ‘senioritis’
November 8, 2001
By Tim Carpenter Jasen Hadl analyzes car engine problems with a $50,000 computer at Lawrence High School. The LHS auto technology course he’s taking to learn how to use sophisticated diagnostic hardware is among a series of classes this senior has taken to prepare for enrollment at a technical school.
Dinosaur man builds record of life in Maryland 115 million years ago
November 8, 2001
For the last decade, Thomas Lipka has spent much of his free time on his hands and knees in a clay pit, sifting through the soil for traces of dinosaurs that lived in Maryland 115 million years ago.
Country shows its colors
Stars shine on red, white and blue night of awards
November 8, 2001
Tim McGraw was named best entertainer at the Country Music Assn. awards Wednesday night during a ceremony that pushed patriotism front-and-center. McGraw added an addendum to his acceptance speech thanking record company executives and his wife, singer Faith Hill. He shouted out his gratitude to U.S. soldiers fighting in the war on terrorism.
EPA official urges sample retesting
Search shows Quality Water Analysis Laboratories falsified records for five years
November 8, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Federal officials Wednesday tried to notify hundreds of clients of a southeast Kansas laboratory under criminal investigation to have their samples re-tested by another laboratory.
THE MAG: Parting shot
November 8, 2001
THE MAG: Bigger than hip-hop
The Coup’s outspoken frontman reflects upon current affairs
November 8, 2001
By Geoff Harkness Boots Riley is one of the most respected MCs in hip-hop, but today he’d rather talk politics. This comes as little surprise, given that he’s spent the better part of the decade fronting music’s most politically informed band, The Coup.
THE MAG: Out of Bounds - For fun and prophet
Miss Cleo’s psychics predict success of Jayhawks’ basketball, football coaching
November 8, 2001
By Seth Jones I could have sat here and started writing about how good I think the Kansas University men’s basketball team will do this year. But that’s been done a million times by a million sports columnists. I required something different, something readers would take more seriously. For a true prediction, I needed to consult a psychic.
Blair stands firmly by U.S. in war against terrorism
November 8, 2001
President Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, allies in the war on terrorism, confidently offered back-to-back pledges of victory on Wednesday, no matter how long it takes.
Nation Briefs
November 8, 2001
Dallas: Burning tractor-trailer followed through city Montana: Small town shocked by beauty shop murders Michigan: Bombs force evacuation of campus genetic labs
Local briefs
November 8, 2001
Haskell to get $54,000 for arch renovations Representatives of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Tribal Council are expected to donate $54,000 today to Haskell Indian Nations University officials. The money will underwrite efforts to restore the Haskell Arch and Stadium. Haskell officials expect to receive the donation during a 10 a.m. ceremony today at Stidham Union. Last month, above photo, the Haskell community celebrated the 75th anniversary of the arch and stadium’s completion. __________________________ America responds: Legislator called to D.C. to help fight terrorism State Rep. Lee Tafanelli, an Ozawkie Republican, has been called to active duty to help out in the war against terrorism. A lieutenant colonel in the Kansas Army National Guard, Tafanelli said he couldn’t be specific about his assignment, but that it will be at the Pentagon and involves homeland security. The 40-year-old computer software salesman is married with two children. Tafanelli said he expects to return to Kansas before the legislative session starts Jan. 14 but said events could change that. Tafanelli represents most of Jefferson County and a part of northeastern Douglas County. __________________________ Elections: Kline to kick off campaign for Kansas attorney general A former state representative who ran unsuccessfully against U.S. Rep. Dennis Moore last year is expected to announce his candidacy for state attorney general today. Phill Kline, a conservative Republican from Shawnee, said Wednesday he would meet with reporters and supporters at 12:30 p.m. today on the east steps of the Douglas County Courthouse, 111 E. 11th. Kline, a 41-year-old attorney, is former chairman of the budget and tax committees in the Kansas House of Representatives. Kline said he’s making campaign appearances in 13 cities today and Friday. State Sen. David Adkins, R-Leawood, announced his candidacy for attorney general earlier this year. Adkins is from the GOP’s moderate wing. __________________________ Kansas University: Audit aims to reduce university energy costs Kansas University has begun an audit aimed at conserving energy. The audit, conducted by CMS-Viron Energy Services in Overland Park, will examine the university’s power plant, ventilation systems and lighting, looking for ways to save money. The audit is expected to be complete by the end of the year. The 2000 Kansas Legislature approved “performance contracting,” which allows money saved from the audit to pay for upgrades to KU’s energy systems during the next 20 years. Provost David Shulenburger last week distributed a memo outlining rules for energy conservation this winter. KU estimates the university saved $335,000 in energy bills last year. KU spent $8 million on energy costs during fiscal year 2001. __________________________ Crime: Police confiscate drugs, gun from teen-agers Six juveniles were arrested Monday afternoon by Lawrence Police after someone reported a burglary in progress. Police responded about 12:15 p.m. to the 3900 block of West 11th Street to check a red, four-door vehicle seen in the area where suspects were reportedly breaking into a house, Sgt. Mike Pattrick said. The vehicle was not there, but a patrol officer saw it in the 1000 block of Monterey Way and stopped it. Six juveniles three 16-year-old boys and three 15-year-old boys were found in the vehicle. Police confiscated an undisclosed amount of marijuana, drug paraphernalia and a .38-caliber pistol, Pattrick said. The boys were taken to the Police Department and then turned over to the Juvenile Intake Assessment Center. The boys eventually were released to their parents. Charges are pending.
Oregon files lawsuit about assisted suicide
November 8, 2001
The state of Oregon sued the U.S. government Wednesday about a federal directive that essentially blocks the state’s assisted-suicide law. The lawsuit challenges the authority of U.S. Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft to limit the practice of medicine in Oregon by attempting to bar physician-assisted suicides.
Pain relievers may protect against Alzheimer’s disease
November 8, 2001
Over-the-counter pain relievers like Advil and Motrin appear to protect against Alzheimer’s disease by thwarting production of a key protein found in the disease’s brain-clogging deposits, a study found.
Study: Extra dose of radiation improves breast cancer outlook
November 8, 2001
An extra dose of radiation aimed squarely at the spot where the tumor was removed can substantially improve the outlook for younger women with breast cancer, a European study found.
Tougher tests on vehicle roofs sought
November 8, 2001
The government is considering changing how vehicle roofs are tested in hopes of better protecting people in rollovers, by far the deadliest type of highway accident. The testing standard hasn’t changed in 28 years, and officials acknowledge it doesn’t mirror what really happens when a vehicle overturns.
Stovall says Microsoft lawsuit is pro-business
November 8, 2001
Atty. Gen. Carla Stovall says the lawsuit with eight other states against Microsoft was not about the software giant but about fair business competition. Stovall said Wednesday that the federal settlement did not go far enough to protect consumers and states.
KU students quiz city commissioners on variety of topics
November 8, 2001
By Terry Rombeck Before Wednesday night’s student forum with Lawrence city commissioners, Julia Gilmore Gaughan predicted student issues such as the city’s multiple-family housing ordinance and border with the Kansas University campus would rule the discussions.
Pharmacist aids N.Y. efforts
KU graduate dispenses preventative antibiotics to postal workers
November 8, 2001
By Mindie Paget Pharmacist Amy Osborn of Oskaloosa dispenses antibiotics every day. But during the past few weeks, the Kansas University graduate’s ability to perform that seemingly unremarkable task has helped quell the fears of thousands of New York City postal workers worried about exposure to anthrax.
NBC News offering a ‘Harry Potter’ preview Sunday night
November 8, 2001
NBC News will try to capture some ratings magic from the upcoming film “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” In an unusual move, NBC News will devote an hour of “Dateline” to covering the making of the Warner Bros. movie and related topics, at 6 p.m. CST Sunday.
Radioactive landfill plans still divide community
November 8, 2001
Just outside town, a few miles from the South Dakota border, lies a field not unlike surrounding farm and ranch land. To the unknowing eye, it appears peaceful. Yet this desolate, 110 acres of prairie grass has been at the center of political, personal and legal battles for 12 years.
Daily ticker
November 8, 2001
Productivity increases as firms cut hours
Workers’ output rises 2.7 percent
November 8, 2001
Worker productivity posted the best showing in more than a year in the third quarter, but the improvement came at a price: Businesses, coping with the economic hard times, slashed workers’ hours by the largest amount in a decade and eliminated jobs.
Bridgestone to settle for $41 million
November 8, 2001
Bridgestone/Firestone Inc. will pay $41.5 million in a settlement to head off lawsuits by states over defective tires the company recalled more than a year ago. Each of the 50 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands will get $500,000, according to a copy of the settlement.
Taliban opposition claims gains
Alliance fighters move closer to northern city
November 8, 2001
The Afghan opposition claimed its fighters edged closer to the strategic northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif on Wednesday, and U.S. special forces reported northern alliance fighters on horseback charged Taliban tanks and armored personnel carriers.
Briefcase
November 8, 2001
As aviation industry suffers, Concorde flights return Wall Street: Stock markets mostly lower as investors take profits Utility: Utilicorp reports decline in third-quarter earnings Pharmaceuticals: Pfizer closing Missouri plant
Senators want to expand opportunities to serve country
November 8, 2001
With military reserves stretched to capacity and America throbbing with a “New Patriotism,” two leading senators are proposing to greatly expand voluntary national-service programs so that ordinary Americans can help defend their homeland.
Cessna plans to build service center in Wichita
November 8, 2001
Saying it had confidence in the future of the company and the country, Cessna Aircraft announced plans Wednesday to build a $60 million Citation service center in Wichita. Cessna Chairman Gary Hay said the country was by most definitions in a recession, and other airplane manufacturers were holding off on expansions.
Business briefs
November 8, 2001
Airlines: Vanguard brings back pilots after attacks Transaction: Enron seeks merger with rival Dynegy Inc. Investing: Waste Management to settle lawsuit
City seeks public input on Internet services
November 8, 2001
By Chad Lawhorn Lawrence officials want to know what types of city services residents would like to receive online. The city’s new e-government committee will be host to a meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at City Hall to present options for delivering some city services online and to receive input on e-government goals citizens most want to see.
Cattle investors sue Nebraska bank
November 8, 2001
Kansas cattle investors have filed a lawsuit alleging their Omaha bank withheld information about a failing livestock business because it hoped to minimize financial losses. The Neuberger family of Overland Park, Kan., sued U.S. Bank in federal court last week, seeking almost $22 million in damages and attorney fees, according to the Omaha World-Herald.
Hatching new lessons
Selections from couple’s dinosaur egg collection on display at KU museum
November 8, 2001
By Jan Biles Florence and Charlie Magovern are paleontologists in other words, dinosaur detectives. For more than a decade, they have searched for and purchased hundreds of dinosaur eggs. Some of the eggs remain at their Boulder, Colo., home, while others are included in exhibits that tour the United States.
Survey details worker deficiencies
November 8, 2001
By Chad Lawhorn A new survey shows Lawrence residents should enter the job force better prepared for listening, decision making and problem solving. But school district officials say they can’t repair those deficiencies by themselves.
Tests find no more anthrax at KC center
November 8, 2001
Additional tests taken inside a contaminated Kansas City postal facility turned up no new anthrax spores, the state’s top health official said Wednesday.
More dinos online
November 8, 2001
Here are some Web sites with information about dinosaurs.
Lawrence rapist’s parole case to be heard
Convict imprisoned since 1982 for rapes, attempted rapes
November 8, 2001
By Mike Belt A Lawrence man will soon be up for parole after he was convicted 23 years ago for several sexual assaults and break-ins that he claimed were commanded by voices in his head. Charles Hunter, 39, is serving 29- to 110-year-total prison sentences for convictions on four counts of rape, two counts of attempted rape and seven counts of aggravated burglary.
How to be a good day-care parent
Child-care directors offer advice to help busy moms and dads
November 8, 2001
Parents looking for child care are usually handed checklists of things to watch for: Is the carpet clean? Do the children look happy? Do teachers have CPR training? Once children are enrolled in a child-care center or home, parents often gripe about the day care and its expenses.
State Briefs
November 8, 2001
RUSSELL: Murder charge filed against victim’s son JUNCTION CITY: Command change completed at Fort Riley
$5 billion Exxon Valdez verdict tossed
November 8, 2001
A federal appeals court Wednesday threw out as excessive the $5 billion punitive-damages verdict against Exxon for the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. The court ordered a judge to determine a lesser amount.
Communication key for parents, caregivers
November 8, 2001
More tips for parents with children in child care.
Pizza makers savor proposed rule change on meat content
November 8, 2001
Hold the pepperoni. The government wants to drop decades-old rules that dictate the ingredients of frozen pizzas, down to how much meat, sausage or pepperoni must be in the toppings.
Geneva Convention conference planned on Mideast conflict
November 8, 2001
Switzerland announced plans Wednesday to organize a conference of the Geneva Conventions, a session diplomats said would likely take Israel to task for its occupation of Palestinian territory.
Two seek treasurer position
November 8, 2001
A legislator with a professional accounting background is running for state treasurer. Harper County’s treasurer also is interested. Sen. Lynn Jenkins of Topeka announced Wednesday that she is seeking the Republican nomination.
Minus cash and crowds, state fair board aims for a revenue remedy
November 8, 2001
Attendance at this summer’s Kansas State Fair in Hutchinson was down nearly 20 percent, causing an estimated $1 million loss for the fair and fair vendors. So, the Kansas State Fair Board decided during meetings Tuesday and Wednesday to eliminate free admission on the first Friday of the fair and approved other measures to improve its cash flow.
Truck traffic
November 8, 2001
Driving passion
November 8, 2001
Slap in the face
November 8, 2001
Missouri River’s flow under fire
Senators agree change is needed, disagree on course of action
November 8, 2001
The Missouri Natural Resources director and both of the state’s U.S. senators spoke out Tuesday night against proposed changes in way the Army Corps of Engineers manages the flow of the Missouri River.
Robert Justin Aycock
November 8, 2001
Mary Teresa Cheek
November 8, 2001
NFL fines Robinson $20,000
Jets safety penalized for twisting quarterback’s helmet
November 8, 2001
The $20,000 fine the NFL imposed on Damien Robinson might be the least of his troubles. Keeping his job as a New York Jets safety could be a bigger concern. After announcing Wednesday that the league fined Robinson for twisting the facemask of Saints quarterback Aaron Brooks and sparking a melee near the end of Sunday’s win at New Orleans, Jets coach Herman Edwards hinted Robinson is on shaky ground.
Baseball owners can’t get it right
Nothing about game’s economics makes sense, so how will contraction help?
November 8, 2001
We have just finished with what might be the most dramatic World Series in history. We are but 48 hours removed from the most watched baseball game in a decade. Everybody is basking in the afterglow of Johnson and Schilling and all of that Yankees pride and passion.
This season’s Winston Cup competition as good as it gets
November 8, 2001
When Joe Nemechek won Sunday’s Pop Secret 400 at North Carolina Speedway, he became the 17th driver to win a Winston Cup race this season. That number is a record for the sport’s “modern era,” the years since the schedule was reduced from the 50 or more races that had been run under the banner of NASCAR’s top series.
Pakistani president heads West for talks
November 8, 2001
With violent protests at a minimum and key opposition clerics in detention, President Pervez Musharraf is confident enough to take his first foreign trip since Sept. 11, leaving his military government to deal with any threats at home.
Postal Service turns to Congress for help with money problems
November 8, 2001
Grim new revenue projections could lead the U.S. Postal Service to ask Congress for more than $5 billion today to offset higher security costs and lower revenues due to the anthrax scare and terrorism.
Bush to get firsthand look at medical epicenter CDC
November 8, 2001
Officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have complained for years about their World War II-era facilities, with leaky roofs, termite-chewed floors and bad wiring that last month delayed the anthrax investigation.
Lawrence attorney fights proposed waste dump
November 8, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Lawrence resident Robert Eye is a longtime warrior in the fight over whether to bury radioactive waste on a piece of land 450 miles away.
Helton, Johnson top rankings
November 8, 2001
Colorado first baseman Todd Helton took over from Arizona pitcher Randy Johnson as baseball’s top player, according to the annual statistical rankings released Wednesday by the Elias Sports Bureau.
Gooden pass highlight
Behind-the-back dish to Boschee nets layup
November 8, 2001
By Gary Bedore One might expect Kansas’ Kirk Hinrich to make a behind-the-back pass. Or Aaron Miles. This time, however, it was 6-foot-10, 230-pound Drew Gooden who fired a highlight film behind-the-back pass just past halfcourt to a streaking Jeff Boschee.
Spurrier scoffs at hype
November 8, 2001
Forget the X’s and O’s. Steve Spurrier’s biggest challenge this week is to convince his Florida players not to listen to all those wonderful things South Carolina coach Lou Holtz says about the Gators.
QB Weinke sidelined
November 8, 2001
An MRI exam showed no structural damage to Chris Weinke’s throwing shoulder, but the rookie still was unable to practice Wednesday for the Carolina Panthers. That left Matt Lytle running the offense, new addition Jim Harbaugh devouring the playbook and the Panthers wondering who would be their quarterback on Sunday against the St. Louis Rams.
Randle’s streak in jeopardy
November 8, 2001
John Randle’s streak of never having missed a game in his 12-year NFL career is in jeopardy because of an injury. The defensive tackle was in pads Wednesday but did not practice as the Seattle Seahawks began preparing for their Sunday night game against the Oakland Raiders.
NFL Briefs
November 8, 2001
Stringer family sues for $100 million Super Bowl might get ‘special event’ status Former Packer dead at 68
NBA Briefs
November 8, 2001
Back problems force Vaught’s retirement Mourning skips trip due to food poisoning Clippers’ Odom admits transgression
NHL Briefs
November 8, 2001
Colorado activates defenseman Foote Goaltender Skudra signs with Canucks Lemieux, Kovalev could return next week
Veterans Day activities
November 8, 2001
The following is a list of Veterans Day activities in the area.
On the record
November 8, 2001
Mistake delays murder trial
November 8, 2001
By Mike Belt A Franklin County murder trial Wednesday was continued to January after a judge read the wrong charge to a pool of potential jurors. People summoned for jury duty had gathered in District Judge James Smith’s courtroom prior to the trial of John Powell, who is charged with second-degree murder.
UCLA’s Foster ineligible
November 8, 2001
UCLA running back DeShaun Foster, the nation’s third-leading rusher and a top Heisman Trophy candidate, has been declared ineligible for competition by the school and will miss Saturday’s game against No. 7 Oregon at the Rose Bowl.
6News video report: Most tenants don’t know their rights
November 8, 2001
Tina Terry reports on the many tenants that are taken advantage of by their landlords, and offers some tips.
List of the casualties of war from Douglas County
November 8, 2001
Listed below are Douglas County residents who have been identified as casualties in wars since the Civil War, and police and firefighters who died in service to the community.
A rigid fiefdom
November 8, 2001
Dino quiz
November 8, 2001
Test your dinosaur knowledge with these questions.
Mary Teresa Cheek
November 8, 2001
Graveside services for Mary Teresa Cheek, 47, Perry, will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Oak Hill Cemetery. Mrs. Cheek died Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2001, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
THE MAG: Film Review - ‘Shallow Hal’
November 8, 2001
By Loey Lockerby Could it be that the Farrelly brothers have mellowed? The guys who created “Dumb & Dumber” and “There’s Something About Mary” have always given their films a touch of sweetness, but they were mostly about seeing how many ways people could be grossed out. Although “Shallow Hal” still has moments that will make viewers laugh and cover their eyes at the same time, it’s a surprisingly gentle, even romantic story about the value of real beauty.
THE MAG: Film Review - ‘Heist’
November 8, 2001
By Dan Lybarger Playwright and filmmaker David Mamet has a soft spot for crooks. From “Glengarry Glen Ross” (about ethically bankrupt real estate salesmen) to “The Spanish Prisoner” (about corporate scam artists), the writer has explored confidence games with voyeuristic glee that often rubs off on a viewer. His eighth film “Heist” in some ways explains and demonstrates this fascination, because Mamet hoodwinks an audience the way his characters rob their victims. This time around, the director is reminiscent of an acquaintance who charms his host to no end while pilfering him. Mamet retreads much of his earlier work, but at least it’s still entertaining.
THE MAG: TOP MOVIES
November 8, 2001
THE MAG: TOP MUSIC
November 8, 2001
THE MAG: Wake Up Call Poll
November 8, 2001
Trickle-down trick
November 8, 2001
Vaughn connects for his first basket during return to Utah
November 8, 2001
Former Kansas University guard Jacque Vaughn broke an 0-for-22 shooting slump when he scored seven points for Atlanta in the Hawks’ 96-89 loss to Utah on Wednesday night. Vaughn connected for his first field goal of the season but missed four other shots to bring his season total to 1-of-27. He hit five of six free throws Wednesday night.
Collison impressed by rookie
November 8, 2001
By David Mitchell No one was any happier than Nick Collison after Wayne Simien dominated EA Sports Central All-Stars in Simien’s Kansas debut. Simien entered Wednesday night’s exhibition basketball game at Allen Fieldhouse after Collison picked up three fouls in the first five minutes.
Kansas sweeps ISU for another road win
November 8, 2001
Kansas University swept Iowa State, 30-28, 30-18, 30-21, in volleyball on Wednesday, marking the first time that the Jayhawks won back-to-back Big 12 matches on the road. The Jayhawks improved to 15-12 overall and 5-11 in the Big 12 with two of those victories coming against Iowa State. The Cyclones dipped to 4-17 and 1-15.
Jayhawks to face MU in Big 12 soccer tournament
November 8, 2001
By Chuck Woodling Kansas blanked Missouri on bluegrass. Now can the Jayhawks spill the Tigers on Bermuda grass? No. 4 seed Kansas and No. 5 seed Missouri will clash at 1:30 p.m. today in the Big 12 Soccer Tournament at Bermuda-covered Blossom Complex in San Antonio. “It’s probably an advantage for us,” KU coach Mark Francis said of playing on the shorter Bermuda.
Interim coach Hayes suspends cornerback Ivey
November 8, 2001
By Robert Sinclair If actions speak louder than words, Kansas University interim head football coach Tom Hayes is making sure the Jayhawks hear him loud and clear. Hayes who was brought in by former coach Terry Allen to be the assistant head coach/defensive coordinator because of his strict, no-nonsense approach to discipline said Wednesday that sophomore cornerback Carl Ivey had been suspended for Saturday’s game at No. 5 Texas.
Satirical weekly newspaper the Onion views everything as a comedy target
November 8, 2001
By Mitchell J. Near In a world turned upside down in the aftermath of terrorist attacks and anthrax scares, one newspaper refuses to succumb to the sort of political correctness currently embraced by most major news media. It’s not The New York Times or The Washington Post, that’s for sure.