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Archive for Saturday, March 3, 2001

Kansas representative urged to back tax-cut plan

March 3, 2001

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— A national small business group is pressuring Kansas Rep. Dennis Moore and two dozen fellow Democrats to vote next week for President Bush's $1 trillion across-the-board income tax cut.

The National Federation of Independent Business is asking its 7,000 Kansas members to e-mail, fax, call and write Moore, who represents the conservative Republican Kansas suburbs around Kansas City, Mo. Of those members, 1,748 are located in Moore's 3rd District.

"There's just no disputing the fact that this bill will put more money in the pockets of the hardworking small-business owners who create two-thirds of all new jobs and make our economy run," said Dan Danner, senior vice president of NFIB.

"Representative Moore is going to hear that message loud and clear from his Main Street constituents over the next week," Danner said.

The other three Kansas congressmen and both state senators, all GOP, are expected to support the cuts.

Moore in 2000 bucked Democratic leaders in voting for repeal of estate and so-called marriage penalty taxes and in voting to override presidential vetoes of those bills. But in 1999 he voted against the Republicans' $792 billion tax-cut package, which also was vetoed.

The two-term congressman has expressed reservations about the $1.6 trillion plan, saying it will consume most of the projected budget surplus. On Friday spokesman Marc Wilson said Moore will spend the weekend and next week talking about the tax cut with constituents.

As of Friday, Wilson said, a dozen NFIB members had contacted Moore's office. Overall, fewer than 100 constituents have contacted Moore about the issue, Wilson said, and calls, letters and e-mails are running slightly in favor of the tax cut.

GOP leaders have scheduled a vote by the full House next week on the legislation, which lowers tax rates for all income levels.

Democratic leaders, meanwhile, said it was wrong to take up tax cuts before Congress acts on a fiscal 2002 budget that could see spending cuts required by the loss in tax revenues.

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